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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Lamentations 3:19

 

 

Remember my affliction and my wandering, the wormwood and bitterness.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Remembering - Or, as in the margin. It is a prayer to Yahweh.

My misery - Or, “my” homelessness (Lamentations 1:7 note).


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Lamentations 3:19". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/lamentations-3.html. 1870.

Coffman's Commentaries on the Bible

II

JEREMIAH REMEMBERS GOD IN HIS CRY FOR HELP

(Lamentations 3:19-39)

"Remember mine affliction and my misery,

the wormwood and the gall.

My soul hath them still in remembrance,

and is bowed down within me.

This I recall to my mind;

therefore have I hope."

"Remember" (Lamentations 3:19). This should be understood as an appeal to God. Certainly, Jeremiah was not asking Israel to remember his afflictions. Israel's king had inflicted them upon the prophet. It was the remembrance of God's past mercies and blessings that he mentioned in Lamentations 3:20 as the basis of his hope. "Knowing that God hears the prayers of the contrite, Jeremiah begins to hope."[24]


Copyright Statement
James Burton Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.

Bibliography
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Lamentations 3:19". "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/lamentations-3.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Remembering mine affliction and my misery,.... The miserable affliction of him and his people; the remembrance of which, and poring upon it continually, caused the despondency before expressed: though it may be rendered imperatively, "remember my affliction, and my misery"F19זכר "recordare", Munster, Pagninus, Montanus, Vatablus, Cocceius, Michealis. ; so the Vulgate Latin and Syriac versions; and Aben Ezra observes, that the words may be considered as a request to God, and so they seem to be; the prophet, and the people he represents, were not so far gone into despair, as to cast off prayer before God; but once more looked up to him, beseeching that he would, in his great mercy and pity, remember them in their distressed condition, and deliver out of it; for none could do it but himself:

the wormwood and the gall; figurative expressions of bitter and grievous afflictions, Lamentations 3:5.


Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Lamentations 3:19". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/lamentations-3.html. 1999.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Remembering mine affliction and my misery, the wormwood and the gall.

Wormwood — Wormwood and gall, are often made use of to signify great affliction.


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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Lamentations 3:19". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/lamentations-3.html. 1765.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

The verb may be considered as an imperative; it is an infinitive mood, but it is often taken in Hebrew as an imperative. Thus, many deem it a prayer, Remember my affliction and my trouble, the gall and the poison This might be admitted; but what others teach I prefer: that this verse depends on the last. For the Prophet seems here to express how he had almost fallen away from hope, so that he no longer found strength from God, even because he was overwhelmed with evils; for it is very unreasonable to think, that those who have once experienced the mercy of God should cast away hope, so as not to believe that they are to flee to God any more. What seems then by no means congruous the Prophet here in a manner excuses, and shews that it was not strange that he succumbed under extreme evils, for he had been so pressed down by afflictions and troubles, that his soul became as it were filled with poison and gall. (181)

But in the meantime, he shews by the word remember, how such a trial as this, when it comes, lays hold on our minds, that is, when we think too much of our evils. For the faithful ought to hold a middle course in their afflictions, lest they contract a torpor; for as hence indifference and stupidity arise, they ought to rouse themselves to a due consideration of their evils; but moderation ought to be observed, lest sorrow should swallow us up, as Paul also warns us (2 Corinthians 2:7.) They then who fix their minds too much on the remembrance of their evils, by degrees open the door to Satan, who may fill their hearts and all their thoughts with despair. The Prophet then describes here the fountain of evils, when he says, that he remembered his affliction and trouble; and suitable to this is what immediately follows, —


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These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Lamentations 3:19". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/lamentations-3.html. 1840-57.

James Nisbet's Church Pulpit Commentary

SHADOW AND SUNSHINE

‘The wormwood and the gall … the Lord’s mercies.’

Lamentations 3:19; Lamentations 3:22

I. Speaking for himself, the prophet personifies his people (Lamentations 3:1-21).—His description of the miseries through which they were passing is very pitiful—the wrinkled skin, the broken bones, the darkness as of the grave, the lofty walls that encompassed them, the penetration of the sharp arrows into their flesh, the derision of the people, the grit of the coarse flour that broke his teeth, the wormwood and the gall of his cup.

II. Full suddenly he draws out another stop in the organ, a stream of hope and comfort pours upon the ear (Lamentations 3:22-33).—It is as though he had caught the cadence of some angel minstrelsy. His heart forgets its grief, as he dwells on the Lord’s mercies and unfailing compassions. Every morning of those dark days witnessed some new provision of God’s care. Forlorn as might be his lot, he could still reckon upon the faithfulness of his never-failing Friend. And the conclusion of his soul amid all his trouble was that God was good. Hold to that, soul, in spite of all appearances, and dare to believe that the Lord is good. Say it to thyself a thousand times. He will not cast off. Though He may have caused grief, yet is His compassion in proportion to the multitude of His mercies.

III. As our confessions and petitions ascend to God, as we search and try our ways and turn again to Him, we shall become conscious that He is drawing near (Lamentations 3:57).—‘Thou saidst, Fear not.’ How often God will utter those words as the years pass! When dreaded evils assail and threaten to overwhelm, as the waves the barque on the Lake of Galilee, that voice, mightier than the noise of many waters, will reassure, and, finally, as we pass into the gate of eternity, our first utterance will be, ‘O Lord, thou hast pleaded the causes of my soul; Thou hast redeemed my life.’

Illustration

‘There is nothing like the Lamentations of Jeremiah in the whole world. There has been plenty of sorrow in every age, and in every land; but such another preacher and author as Jeremiah, with such a heart for sorrow, has never again been born. Dante comes next to Jeremiah, and we know that Jeremiah was that great exile’s favourite prophet. Both prophet and poet were full to all the height and depth of their great hearts of the most thrilling sensibility; while, at the same time, they were both “high towers,” and “brazen walls,” and “iron pillars” against all unrighteousness of men. And they were alike in this also, that, just because of their combined strength, and sternness, and sensibility, no man in their day sympathised with them. They made all men’s causes of suffering and sorrow their own, till all men hated them and put a price on their heads.’


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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Nisbet, James. "Commentary on Lamentations 3:19". Church Pulpit Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cpc/lamentations-3.html. 1876.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Lamentations 3:19 Remembering mine affliction and my misery, the wormwood and the gall.

Ver. 19. Remembering mine affliction and my misery, the wormwood and the gall,] i.e., The bitterness that was in it, but of mine own commingling. Impatiens quisque bis affligitur, Impatience redoubleth an affliction.


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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Lamentations 3:19". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/lamentations-3.html. 1865-1868.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

If, according to our translation, we read

Remembering, or While I remember, these two verses contain but one sentence; in tire former part the prophet in the name of this people expresseth their despairing condition; in the latter he gives the reason of it, viz. the people’s poring upon their great and heavy afflictions, which he compares to wormwood and gall, two things excessively bitter, and often made use of to signify great affliction, Psalms 69:21 Jeremiah 8:14 9:15 23:15 Revelation 8:11. But it may as well be read imperatively, Remember mine affliction; so the first of these two verses expresseth the dejection of the people’s minds in their captivity, caused through their proneness to despair of any better condition that their angry God would bring them into. The 19th verse is a prayer directed to God, which showed that though they were mightily perplexed, yet they were not in utter despair; and to this sense the following verses seem to incline.


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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Lamentations 3:19". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/lamentations-3.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

PIOUS ACKNOWLEDGMENT OF GOD’S SOVEREIGNTY AND MERCY, Lamentations 3:19-39.

19. Remembering — Better, remember, as in the margin. The verb is an infinitive, as in the fourth commandment. Affliction, misery, wormwood, and gall are reminiscences of chapter 1.


Copyright Statement
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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Lamentations 3:19". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/lamentations-3.html. 1874-1909.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

Jeremiah prayed that the Lord would remember his affliction and bitterness (cf. Job 13:15).


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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on Lamentations 3:19". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/lamentations-3.html. 2012.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

Remembering = Remember.


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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Lamentations 3:19". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/lamentations-3.html. 1909-1922.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(19) Remembering.—The verb, which is rendered by the Authorised version as a gerundial infinitive, is better taken as an imperative, Remember mine affliction; the prayer being addressed to Jehovah. The two terms of the first clause are taken from Lamentations 1:7. The mourner begins his prayer, as it were, by a recapitulation of his sufferings. (Comp. Psalms 69:21.)


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Lamentations 3:19". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/lamentations-3.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Remembering mine affliction and my misery, the wormwood and the gall.
Remembering
or, Remember.
Nehemiah 9:32; Job 7:7; Psalms 89:47,50; 132:1
the
5,15; Jeremiah 9:15

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Lamentations 3:19". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/lamentations-3.html.

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