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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Lamentations 3:22

 

 

The LORD'S lovingkindnesses indeed never cease, For His compassions never fail.

Adam Clarke Commentary

It is of the Lord's mercies that we are not consumed - Being thus humbled, and seeing himself and his sinfulness in a proper point of view, he finds that God, instead of dealing with him in judgment, has dealt with him in mercy; and that though the affliction was excessive, yet it seas less than his iniquity deserved. If, indeed, any sinner be kept out of hell, it is because God's compassion faileth not.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Lamentations 3:22". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/lamentations-3.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Verses 22-42 are the center of the present poem, as it also holds the central place in the whole series of the Lamentations. In them the riches of God‘s grace and mercy are set forth in the brightest colors, but no sooner are they ended than the prophet resumes the language of woe.

That we - He is speaking as the representative of all sufferers.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Lamentations 3:22". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/lamentations-3.html. 1870.

Coffman's Commentaries on the Bible

"It is of Jehovah's lovingkindness that we are not consumed,

because his compassions fail not.

They are new every morning;

great is thy faithfulness.

Jehovah is my portion, saith my soul;

therefore will I hope in him.

Jehovah is good unto them that wait for him,

to the soul that seeketh him.

It is good that a man should hope

and quietly wait for the salvation of Jehovah.

It is good for the man

that he bear the yoke in his youth."

"Because his compassions fail not" (Lamentations 3:22). "Indeed, if any man escapes hell, it is because God's compassions fail not."[25]

This section through Lamentations 3:39 (or Lamentations 3:42) carries an expression of full assurance in God's unfailing mercies; and that such is found in Lamentations is indeed remarkable and carries its own rich consolations."[26] "It is interesting that the author, himself a sufferer, here becomes an advisor as well. He gives counsel from the wisdom he has learned, so that the nation could learn from it."[27] This section is not merely the heart of this chapter, it is also the heart of Lamentations. "This is the focal point of the whole book; it is a central core of hope of restoration for Israel in God's own good time; and there is a symmetry in the book that highlights this central core. There is also an inherent assurance here that the cry for mercy will be heard."[28] "These verses teach that God is good, especially to those who, being in adversity, can yet wait in confidence upon his mercy."[29]


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James Burton Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.

Bibliography
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Lamentations 3:22". "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/lamentations-3.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

It is of the Lord's mercies that we are not consumed,.... It was true of the prophet, that he died not in prison, or in the dungeon; and of the people of the Jews, who though many of them perished by the sword, famine, and pestilence, yet God did not make a full end of them, according to his gracious promise, Jeremiah 30:11; but left them a seed, a remnant, from whence the Messiah, the mercy promised, should come, and to which it was owing they were not utterly cut off for their sins: nor are any of the Lord's special people ever consumed; their estates may be consumed, and so may their bodies by wasting diseases, and at last by death; but not their souls, not only as to their being, but as to their well being, here and hereafter; though their peace, joy, and comfort, may be gone for a while, through temptation, desertion, and the prevalence of corruption; and they may be in declining circumstances, as to the exercise of grace, yet the principle itself can never be lost; faith, hope, and love, will abide; nor can they eternally perish, or be punished with an everlasting destruction: all which is to be ascribed not to their own strength to preserve themselves, nor to any want of desert in them to be destroyed, or of power in God to consume them; but to his "mercies" and "goodnesses", the multitude of them; for there is an abundance of mercy, grace, and goodness in God, and various are the instances of it; as in the choice of his people to grace and glory; in the covenant of grace, and the blessings of it they are interested in; in redemption by Christ; in regeneration by his Spirit; in the forgiveness of their sins; and in their complete salvation; which are all so many reasons why they are not, and shall not be, consumed. The words may be rendered, "the mercies" or "goodnesses of the Lord, for they are not consumed", or, "that the mercies of the Lord", &c.F23חסדי יהוה כי לא תמנו "quod misericordiae Jehovae deficiunt", vel "defecerunt", so some in Vatablus; "studia Jehovae quod non defecerunt", Cocceius. Jarchi observes, that "tamnu" is as "tammu"; the "nun" being inserted, according to Aben Ezra, instead of doubling the letter "mem"; and the former makes the sense to be this, in connection with the Lamentations 3:21; "this I recall to mind the mercies of the Lord, that they are not consumed"; to which agrees the Targum,

"the goodnesses, of the Lord, for they cease not;'

and so the Septuagint, "the mercies of the Lord, for they have not left me"; and to the same sense the Syriac version is, "the mercies of the Lord, for they have no end", and Aben Ezra's note on the text is almost in the same words,

"for there is no end to the mercies of God;'

because his compassions fail not; or, "his tender mercies"F24רחמו "miserationes ejus", Junius & Tremellius, Piscator. ; of which he is full, and which are bestowed in a free and sovereign way, and are the spring of all good things, and a never failing one they are; and this is another reason why the Lord's people are not consumed, and never shall, because of the mercies of the Lord, since these shall never fail; for though they are, yet should they fail, they might be consumed; but these are from everlasting to everlasting, and are kept with Christ their covenant head; see Psalm 103:17.


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Lamentations 3:22". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/lamentations-3.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

[It is of] the LORD'S i mercies that we are not consumed, because his compassions fail not.

(i) Considering the wickedness of man it is a marvel that any remains alive: but only that God for his own mercies sake and for his promise will ever have his Church remain, though they are never so few in number, (Isaiah 1:9).

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Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Lamentations 3:22". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/lamentations-3.html. 1599-1645.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

The first clause may be explained in two ways: The view commonly taken is, that it ought to be ascribed to God’s mercy that the faithful have not been often consumed. Hence a very useful doctrine is elicited — that God succors his own people, lest they should wholly perish. But if we attend to the context, we shall see that another sense is more suitable, even that the mercies of God were not consumed, and that his compassion’s had not failed The particle כי,ki, is inserted, but ought to be taken as an affirmative only, surely the mercies of God are not consumed; (183) and then, — surely his compassion’s have not failed. And he afterwards adds, —

22.The mercies of Jehovah, verily they have no end,
For his compassion’s never fail.

23.Renewed (are they) in the morning;
Great is thy faithfulness.

“Renewed” refers to “mercies,” i.e., blessings, the fruit of mercy; and God’s mercies have no end, because his compassion’s ever continue. “In the morning,” that is, after a night of affliction. If the rendering be made literal, “in the mornings,” the meaning is the same; they follow the previous nights of trouble. Blessings, being as it were suspended or withheld during the night, are again renewed in the morning. — Ed.


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Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Lamentations 3:22". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/lamentations-3.html. 1840-57.

James Nisbet's Church Pulpit Commentary

SHADOW AND SUNSHINE

‘The wormwood and the gall … the Lord’s mercies.’

Lamentations 3:19; Lamentations 3:22

I. Speaking for himself, the prophet personifies his people (Lamentations 3:1-21).—His description of the miseries through which they were passing is very pitiful—the wrinkled skin, the broken bones, the darkness as of the grave, the lofty walls that encompassed them, the penetration of the sharp arrows into their flesh, the derision of the people, the grit of the coarse flour that broke his teeth, the wormwood and the gall of his cup.

II. Full suddenly he draws out another stop in the organ, a stream of hope and comfort pours upon the ear (Lamentations 3:22-33).—It is as though he had caught the cadence of some angel minstrelsy. His heart forgets its grief, as he dwells on the Lord’s mercies and unfailing compassions. Every morning of those dark days witnessed some new provision of God’s care. Forlorn as might be his lot, he could still reckon upon the faithfulness of his never-failing Friend. And the conclusion of his soul amid all his trouble was that God was good. Hold to that, soul, in spite of all appearances, and dare to believe that the Lord is good. Say it to thyself a thousand times. He will not cast off. Though He may have caused grief, yet is His compassion in proportion to the multitude of His mercies.

III. As our confessions and petitions ascend to God, as we search and try our ways and turn again to Him, we shall become conscious that He is drawing near (Lamentations 3:57).—‘Thou saidst, Fear not.’ How often God will utter those words as the years pass! When dreaded evils assail and threaten to overwhelm, as the waves the barque on the Lake of Galilee, that voice, mightier than the noise of many waters, will reassure, and, finally, as we pass into the gate of eternity, our first utterance will be, ‘O Lord, thou hast pleaded the causes of my soul; Thou hast redeemed my life.’

Illustration

‘There is nothing like the Lamentations of Jeremiah in the whole world. There has been plenty of sorrow in every age, and in every land; but such another preacher and author as Jeremiah, with such a heart for sorrow, has never again been born. Dante comes next to Jeremiah, and we know that Jeremiah was that great exile’s favourite prophet. Both prophet and poet were full to all the height and depth of their great hearts of the most thrilling sensibility; while, at the same time, they were both “high towers,” and “brazen walls,” and “iron pillars” against all unrighteousness of men. And they were alike in this also, that, just because of their combined strength, and sternness, and sensibility, no man in their day sympathised with them. They made all men’s causes of suffering and sorrow their own, till all men hated them and put a price on their heads.’


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Bibliography
Nisbet, James. "Commentary on Lamentations 3:22". Church Pulpit Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cpc/lamentations-3.html. 1876.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Lamentations 3:22 [It is of] the LORD’S mercies that we are not consumed, because his compassions fail not.

Ver. 22. It is of the Lord’s mercy that we are not consumed.] That we are yet on this side hell. This sentence was much in the mouth of that famous Maria Aegyptiaca, and should be in all our minds and mouths for a lenitive.

Because his compassions fail (a) not.] Or, Are not spent, wasted, but, as the oil in the cruse, as the spring ever runneth, the sun ever shineth, &c. This should ever shine in our hearts as the sun doth in the firmament.


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Lamentations 3:22". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/lamentations-3.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Lamentations 3:22. It is of the Lord's mercies This is the Lord's mercy, that he hath not entirely consumed me; neither are his companions exhausted.


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Bibliography
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Lamentations 3:22". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/lamentations-3.html. 1801-1803.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Mercy is nothing else but love flowing freely from any to persons in misery, and differs from compassion only in the freeness of the emanation. It is not because God had not power enough utterly to have consumed us, nor because we had not guilt enough to have provoked his justice to have put an end to our lives, as well as to the lives of many thousands of our countrymen, but it is merely from the Lord’s free love and pity to us in our miseries. If God had not a blessing in store for us, how is it that we are captives, and not slain as many others were during the siege?


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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Lamentations 3:22". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/lamentations-3.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

22. We are not consumed — “We,” here, takes the place of I without any marked transition, suggesting, as above intimated, that the prophet in what goes before identifies himself with the people.


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Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Lamentations 3:22". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/lamentations-3.html. 1874-1909.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

The prophet remembered that the Lord"s loyal love (Heb. hesed) never ceases and that He is ceaselessly compassionate.


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Bibliography
Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on Lamentations 3:22". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/lamentations-3.html. 2012.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

CHAPTER III.


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Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Lamentations 3:22". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/lamentations-3.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

mercies = lovingkindnesses.

because = verily.


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Lamentations 3:22". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/lamentations-3.html. 1909-1922.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(22) It is of the Lord’s mercies.—It is, perhaps, part of the elaborate art of this poem that Lamentations 3:22-42, which form its centre, and that of the whole book, represent the highest point of trust to which the mourner attains, being both preceded and followed by words of lamentation.


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Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Lamentations 3:22". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/lamentations-3.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

It is of the LORD'S mercies that we are not consumed, because his compassions fail not.
of
Ezra 9:8,9,13-15; Nehemiah 9:31; Psalms 78:38; 106:45; Ezekiel 20:8,9,13,14,21; Ezekiel 20:22; Malachi 3:6
because
Psalms 77:8; 86:15; Micah 7:18,19; Luke 1:50

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Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Lamentations 3:22". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/lamentations-3.html.

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