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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Lamentations 3:25

 

 

The LORD is good to those who wait for Him, To the person who seeks Him.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

The Lord is good to them that wait for him,.... For the enjoyment of him as their portion in this world, and in that to come; for his presence here and hereafter; which they are sometimes now deprived of, but should wait patiently for it; since he has his set time to arise and favour them with it; to such is he "good" communicatively, and in a special way and manner. They that wait for him shall not be ashamed, or disappointed of what they expect; they shall renew their spiritual strength, and grow stronger and stronger; they shall inherit the earth, the new heavens and the new earth; enjoy many blessings now, and have good things laid up for them hereafter, eye has not seen, nor ear heard, Isaiah 49:23; perhaps some regard may be had to the coming of Christ in the flesh, which the saints then expected, and were waiting for in faith and hope; to whom the Lord was good and gracious in due time, by performing the mercy promised them, Isaiah 25:9;

to the soul that seeketh him; that seeketh him aright; that seeks him by prayer and supplication; that seeks him in his house and ordinances, where he is to be found; that seeks him early, in the first place, and above all things else; that seeks him earnestly, diligently, with his whole spirit, heart, and soul; that seeks his face, his favour, grace, and glory, and all in Christ, through whom all are to be enjoyed. God is good to such souls; he is a rewarder of them in a way of grace; with himself, as their shield and exceeding great reward; with his Son, and all things freely with him; with his Spirit and graces, and with eternal glory and happiness; such find what they seek for, Christ, his grace, and eternal fire; the Lord never forsakes them, nor the work of his hand in them, and they shall live spiritually and eternally; see Hebrews 11:6.


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Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Lamentations 3:25". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/lamentations-3.html. 1999.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

He continues the same subject: he however adds now something to it, even that God always deals mercifully with his servants, who recumb on him, mid who seek him. We hence see that the last verse is confirmed, where he said that he was content with God alone, while suffering all kinds of adversity: How so? for God, he says, is good to those who wait for him. (184) It might have been objected and said, that adversities produce sorrow, weariness, sadness, and anguish, so that it cannot be that they retain hope who only look to God alone; and it is no doubt true that, when all confess that they hope in God, they afterwards run here and there; and the consequence is, that they fail in their adversities. As, then, this might have been objected to the Prophet, he gives indirectly this answer, that God is good to those who wait for him, as though he had said, that the confidence which recumbs on God alone cannot disappoint us, for God will at length shew his kindness to all those who hope in him. In short, the Prophet teaches us here, that the blessings of God, by which he exhilarates his own children, cannot be separated from his mercy or his paternal favor. Such a sentence as this, “Whatever can be expected is found in God,” would be deemed frigid by many; for they might object and say, as before stated, that they were at the same time miserable. Hence the Prophet reminds us here that God’s blessings flow to us from his favor as from a fountain, as though he had said, “As a perennial fountain sends forth water, so also God’s goodness manifests and extends itself.”

We now, then, understand the Prophet’s meaning. He had indeed said, that we ought to acquiesce in God alone; but now he adds, by way of favor, regarding the infirmity of men, that God is kind and bountiful to all those who hope in him. The sum of what he states is, as I have said, that God’s goodness brings forth its own fruits, and that the faithful find by experience, that nothing is better than to have all their thoughts fixed on God alone. God’s goodness, then, ought to be understood, so to speak, as actual, even what is really enjoyed. As, then, God deals bountifully with all who hope in him, it follows that they cannot be disappointed, while they are satisfied with him alone, and thus patiently submit to all adversities. In short, the Prophet teaches here what the Scripture often declares, that hope maketh not ashamed. (Romans 5:5.)

But the second clause must be noticed: for the Prophet defines what it is to hope in God, when he says that he is good to the soul that seeks him. Many indeed imagine hope to be I know not what — a dead speculation; and hypocrites, when God spares them, go on securely and exult, but their confidence is mere ebriety, very different from hope. We must then remember what the Prophet says here, that they alone hope hi God who from the heart seek him, that is, who acknowledge how greatly they need the mercy of God, who go directly to him whenever any temptation harasses them, and who, when any danger threatens them, flee to his aid, and thus prove that they really hope in God. It now follows, —


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Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Lamentations 3:25". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/lamentations-3.html. 1840-57.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Lamentations 3:25 The LORD [is] good unto them that wait for him, to the soul [that] seeketh him.

Ver. 25. The Lord is good unto them that wait for him.] Which few can skill of, and I have somewhat to do to hit on, but would not now have missed of for all the world. (a)

To the soul that seeketh him.] Not giving over till he findeth him.


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Lamentations 3:25". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/lamentations-3.html. 1865-1868.

Sermon Bible Commentary

Lamentations 3:25

Throughout the Scriptures the two terms, seeking and waiting, run parallel as describing prayer, earnest and effectual prayer, in all its acts and offices. The command to seek the Lord and the command to wait on the Lord have the same general meaning, and the same general promises are given to each. But in this passage they are for once combined; their combination suggesting a certain difference between them and the perfection of devotion which results from their union.

I. Generally in the combination of these two terms, each expresses the perfection of all prayer as it is either the active seeking of God or the passive waiting for Him; in other words, what man does and what he must expect God to do in the whole business of devotion. All communion with God requires this.

II. Again, the seeking stands here and everywhere for the pleading boldness of prayer, which requires to be qualified by its waiting humility.

III. The two terms signify the fervour and earnestness of prayer joined to persistency in that fervour; and the rare combination of these gives the highest character to the tone of cur devotion. The waiting habit is as constantly commended to us as the seeking: (1) as the test of real earnestness, and (2) as its stimulant.

IV. The two words may be applied to the confidence and submission of prayer as it has to do with the seeking and waiting for special blessings. (1) This union of confidence and submission will dispose us to pray for temporal good and earthly deliverances with entire submission to the will of God; confident that we are heard, but leaving the answer to His wisdom. (2) This is true also of spiritual requests. We must plead for them, and yet learn in waiting the reason why they are withheld. They are granted in an indirect manner, and in the discipline of graces more important than the gifts themselves.

V. The combination of seeking and waiting forms in its highest perfection the devotional state of the soul in which both the seeking and the waiting go beyond their former meanings, and blend into the habit rather than the act of communion with God.

W. B. Pope, Sermons, Addresses, and Charges, p. 155.



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Bibliography
Nicoll, William R. "Commentary on Lamentations 3:25". "Sermon Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/sbc/lamentations-3.html.

Charles Simeon's Horae Homileticae

DISCOURSE: 1092

THE GOODNESS OF GOD TO SUPPLIANTS

Lamentations 3:25. The Lord is good unto them that wait for him, to the soul that seeketh him.

“THE earth,” we are told, “is full of the goodness of the Lord [Note: Psalms 33:5.]:” and indeed it is not possible to behold the universe at large, or to inspect with accuracy any thing that is contained in it, without being convinced that God is good to all, and that his tender mercy is over all his works [Note: Psalms 145:9.]” But to the humble suppliant he manifests his goodness in a more especial manner, as we are informed in the words before us: from which we shall take occasion to notice,

I. The character here given of the Deity—

The humble suppliant is an object of his peculiar regard. To him he will pay attention,

1. In a way of merciful acceptance—

[He may have sinned grievously, and for a long season; yea, he may have equalled even Manasseh himself in his iniquities, and yet find mercy with the Lord, provided he seek for it in humble, earnest, and believing prayer [Note: 2 Chronicles 33:12-13.] — — — He may have even backslidden from God, and fallen grievously, after having long professed himself a servant of God; and yet, on his repentance, God will heal his backslidings, and love him freely [Note: Jeremiah 3:22. Psalms 32:5.] — — — There are no bounds to the mercy of God towards returning penitents [Note: Isaiah 1:18.] — — —]

2. In a way of friendly communication—

[Let any soul “draw nigh to God, and God will draw nigh unto him [Note: James 4:8.]:” and let him “open his mouth ever so wide, God will fill it [Note: Psalms 81:10.].” Does he need direction in difficulties? God will cause him to “hear a voice behind him, saying, This is the way; walk thou in it [Note: Isaiah 30:21.].” Is he in deep affliction? God will afford him such a measure of support and consolation as his necessities shall require [Note: Isaiah 51:3.]. Does he need peculiar supplies of grace and strength? God will give him “grace sufficient for him [Note: 2 Corinthians 12:9.],” and “strength according to his day [Note: Deuteronomy 33:25.].”]

3. In a way of gracious recompence—

[Not a sigh or groan shall pass unheeded by Almighty God [Note: Psalms 12:5.], nor a tear fall without being treasured up in his vials [Note: Psalms 56:8.]. And at the last day he will bear testimony to all the efforts which the contrite soul has made [Note: Isaiah 66:2.], and will compensate it with an eternal weight of glory; not indeed as a reward of debt, but as a reward of grace, which he has promised to all who seek him in his Son’s name [Note: John 6:37. Romans 4:5.].]

And now what language will be sufficient to express,

II. The encouragement afforded by it—

To enter fully into this would occupy us too long. I will confine myself therefore to the hints suggested in my text. Surely this view of the Deity may encourage all of us,

1. To seek him with earnestness—

[Were God regardless of the prayers of the poor destitute, we night well sit down in despair. But “he invites to him the weary and heavy-laden;” and says, “Call upon me in the time of trouble, and I will bear thee, and thou shalt glorify me [Note: Psalms 50:15.]” We may well therefore go to him, and “pour out our hearts before him,” and plead with him, yea, and “wrestle with him,” as Jacob did, determining “not to let him go until he bless us.” This, so far from offending him, will rather be most acceptable to his Divine Majesty; because he bids us “seek him with our whole hearts” and with our whole souls [Note: 1 Chronicles 22:19. Psalms 119:2.] — — —]

2. To wait for him with patience—

[God may have many wise and gracious reasons for deferring his answers to our prayers: he may wish to embitter sin to us; to humble our souls move deeply; to make us more sensible of our need of mercy, and of our entire dependence on his grace. He may choose this way of weaning us from the world, of quickening us in all our duties, of advancing our attainments in the divine life, and of fitting us for greater usefulness to our fellow-sinners. He may delay his answers, so long as to make us doubt whether he has not “forgotten to be gracious unto us, and shut up his loving-kindness from us in displeasure.” But, knowing his character, we should never abandon ourselves to despair, but “tarry his leisure;” and determine, if we perish, to perish at the foot of the cross, crying for mercy in Jesu’s name. However long “the vision may tarry, we should wait for it,” in a full and perfect confidence that “it shall not tarry” one single moment beyond what God in his wisdom sees to be the fittest time [Note: Habakkuk 2:3.]. Of this we may assure ourselves, that “none shall ever seek his face in vain.”]

Application—

1. Let none of us, then, neglect the duty of prayer—

[Prayer is indispensably required, in order to our obtaining of the Divine favour [Note: Matthew 7:7-8.] — — — And “if we have not, it is either because we ask not, or because we ask amiss [Note: James 4:2-3.]. Brethren, remember, I pray you, what you have at stake; and trifle not in your approaches to the Most High God, as if he could be deceived by formal and heartless petitions. Could it once be said of you, “Behold, he prayeth!” we should have a good hope respecting you: but if you live not nigh to God, in the exercise of fervent prayer, we must declare to you, that God’s goodness, so far as it respects you, will speedily come to an end, and be turned into wrathful indignation: for he has said, that “he will pour out his fury upon all who restrain prayer before him, and call not on his name [Note: Jeremiah 10:25.].”]

2. Let us, in particular, exercise faith in prayer—

[A man “who asks with a wavering mind, can receive nothing of the Lord [Note: James 1:6-7.].” Believe that “he is good,” according as he has said, to all who “call upon him in spirit and in truth.” You are authorized to expect at his hands whatever you ask, provided the conferring of it will tend to your welfare, and to the honour of his name [Note: 1 John 5:14-15.]. His promise to you is, “All things, whatsoever ye shall ask, believing, ye shall receive [Note: Matthew 21:22.].” “Be strong, then, in faith, giving glory to him;” and “never be straitened in yourselves, since you need never fear that ye shall be straitened in him:” for, as he is able, so is he also willing, to give you exceeding abundantly above all that you can ask or even think.”]


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Bibliography
Simeon, Charles. "Commentary on Lamentations 3:25". Charles Simeon's Horae Homileticae. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/shh/lamentations-3.html. 1832.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Good is a term of a very comprehensive notion. The nature of it lieth in a suitableness to the thing or person to whom it relateth; so it signifieth profit and pleasantness. There is in God an essential goodness, which is his absolute perfection; but this text speaketh of a communicative goodness, which floweth from him to his creatures, and is seen in his suiting their various necessities and desires with satisfactory dispensations of providence. Though God be in one degree or oilier good to all, yet he is more especially good to the true worshippers of him; yet possibly not in their seasons or times when they expect or would have God show himself so to them, in this or that way, but always to those who wait for him, patiently enduring trials and afflictions until God please to send them deliverance.


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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Lamentations 3:25". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/lamentations-3.html. 1685.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

wait for Him. Reference to Pentateuch (Genesis 49:18, same word).


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Lamentations 3:25". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/lamentations-3.html. 1909-1922.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(25) The Lord is good.—The alliterative form of the Hebrew makes “good” the first word of this and the two following verses, the adjective being predicated, first of the essential character of Jehovah, and then of the conditions in man on which the manifestation of that character depends.


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Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Lamentations 3:25". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/lamentations-3.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

The LORD is good unto them that wait for him, to the soul that seeketh him.
good
26; Genesis 49:18; Psalms 25:8; 27:14; 37:7,34; 39:7; 40:1-5; 61:1,5; Psalms 130:5,6; Isaiah 25:9; 30:18; 40:31; 64:4; Micah 7:7,8; Zephaniah 3:8; 1 Thessalonians 1:10; James 5:7
to
1 Chronicles 28:9; 2 Chronicles 15:2; 19:3; 30:19; 31:21; Psalms 22:26; 27:8; 69:32; 105:3; Psalms 119:2; Isaiah 26:9; 55:6; Hosea 10:12

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
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Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Lamentations 3:25". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/lamentations-3.html.

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