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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Lamentations 3:26

 

 

It is good that he waits silently For the salvation of the LORD.

Adam Clarke Commentary

It is good that a man should both hope - Hope is essentially necessary to faith; he that hopes not, cannot believe; if there be no expectation, there can be no confidence. When a man hopes for salvation, he should not only waft for it, but use every means that may lead to it; for hope cannot live, if there be no exercise. If hope become impatient, faith will be impossible: for who can believe for his salvation when his mind is agitated? He must therefore quietly wait. He must expect, and yet be dumb, as the words imply; ever feeling his utter unworthiness; and, without murmuring, struggle into life.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Lamentations 3:26". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/lamentations-3.html. 1832.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

It is good that a man should both hope and quietly wait,.... This follows from the former; for if God is good to such, it must be good for them to hope and wait for him; it is both their duty and their interest: and it may be observed, that hope is the ground of patient waiting, and is here promised to it; where there is no hope of a thing, there will be no waiting for it, much less quietly: hope is of things unseen, future, difficult, and yet possible, or there would be no hope; and where there is that, there will be waiting; for "if we hope for that we see not, then do we with patience wait for it", Romans 8:25; here in the original text it is, "hope, and be silent"F26ויחיל ודומם "et expectet et silens", Pagninus, Montanus; "qui et expectat et silet", Piscator. ; or, "a good man will both hope" or "wait, and be silent"F1"Bonus ergo et expectabit et silens erit", Schmidt. ; that is, under the present dispensation, though an afflictive one; men should be still, as David exhorts, and be dumb, as he was; and hold their peace, as Aaron did, at such seasons: not that they should indulge a stoical apathy, or be insensible of their condition, and disregard the rod, and him that has appointed it, or be altogether silent and speechless; but should own the hand of God, and their deserts, cry to him for deliverance, be thankful it is no worse, and speak of the gracious dealings of God with them; yet should not murmur and complain, or charge God foolishly; but be resigned to his will, and wait the issue of Providence quietly, even wait

for the salvation of the Lord; for temporal deliverance from outward evils and present afflictions, and for spiritual and eternal salvation. The saints, under the Old Testament, waited for Christ, the author of salvation, appointed and promised by the Lord. He is come, and has obtained salvation, which is published in the Gospel. Sensible sinners are made acquainted with their need of it, and see the fulness and suitableness of it, and are earnestly desirous of knowing their interest in it; this is not immediately had; it is good to wait quietly for it, in an attendance on the word and ordinances; and this being come at, still the complete enjoyment is yet behind: saints are now heirs of it, are kept unto it; it is nearer them than when they believed; Christ will appear unto it, and it becomes them to wait patiently for it; which will be a salvation from the very being of sin; from the temptations of Satan; from all troubles inward and outward; from all troublesome persons and things; from all doubts, fears, darkness, and unbelief; and will consist in perfect happiness and glory, and is worth waiting for.


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
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Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Lamentations 3:26". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/lamentations-3.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

quietly wait — literally, “be in silence.” Compare Lamentations 3:28 and Psalm 39:2, Psalm 39:9, that is, to be patiently quiet under afflictions, resting in the will of God (Psalm 37:7). So Aaron (Leviticus 10:2, Leviticus 10:3); and Job (Job 40:4, Job 40:5).


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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Lamentations 3:26". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/lamentations-3.html. 1871-8.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

It is, indeed, an abrupt phrase when he says, Good and he will wait; for these words are without a subject; but as it is a general statement, there is no ambiguity. The Prophet means that it is good to hope and to be silent as to the salvation, of God. Then the verbs in the future tense ought to be rendered its subjunctives, as though it was said, “It is good when any one hopes in the salvation of Jehovah, and is silent, that is, bears patiently all his troubles until God succors him.” (185)

But; the Prophet here reminds us, that we are by no means to require that God should always appear to us, and that his paternal favor should always shine forth on our life. This is, indeed, a condition sought for by all; for the flesh inclines us to this, and hence we shun adversities. We, then, naturally desire God’s favor to be manifested to us; how? In reality, so that all things may go on prosperously, that no trouble may touch us, that we may be tormented by no anxiety, that no danger may be suspended over us, that no calamity may threaten us: these things, as I have said, we all naturally seek and desire. But in such a case faith would be extinguished, as Paul tells us in his Epistle to the Romans,

“For we hope not,” he says, “for what appears, but we hope for what, is hidden.”
(
Romans 8:24.)

It is necessary in this world that the faithful should, as to outward things, be miserable, at one time exposed to want, at another subject to various dangers — at; one time exposed to reproaches and calumnies, at another harassed by losses: why so? because there would be no occasion for exercising hope, were our salvation complete. This is the very thing which the Prophet now teaches us, when he declares that it is good for us to learn in silence to wait for the salvation of God.

But to express more clearly his mind, he first says, He will wait, or hope. He teaches the need of patience, as also the Apostle does, in Hebrews 10:36; for otherwise there can be no faith. It hence appears, that where there is no patience, there is not even a spark of faith in the heart of man; how so? because this is our happiness, to wait or to hope; and we hope for what is hidden. But in the second clause he explains himself still more clearly by saying, and will be silent To be silent means often in Scripture to rest, to be still; and here it signifies no other thing than to bear the troubles allotted to us, with a calm and resigned mind. He is then said to be silent to God, who remains quiet even when afflictions supply occasion for clamoring; and hence this quietness is opposed to violent feelings; for when some trouble presses on us, we become turbulent, and are carried away by our fury, at one time we quarrel with God, at another we pour forth various complaints. The same thing also happens, when we see some danger, for we tremble, and then we seek remedies here and there, and that with great eagerness. But he who patiently bears his troubles, or who recumbs on God when dangers surround him, is said to be silent or to rest quietly; and hence the words of Isaiah, “In hope and silence;” for he there exhorts the faithful to patience, and shews where strength is, even when we trust in God, so as willingly to submit to His will, and to be ready to bear his chastisements, and then when we doubt not but that he will be ready to bring us help when we are in danger. (Isaiah 30:15.)

We now perceive what the Prophet means when he says, that it. is good if we wait and be silent as to the salvation of God; even because our happiness is hid, and we are also like the dead, as Paul says, and our life is hid in Christ. (Colossians 3:3.) As then it is so, we must necessarily be silent as to God’s salvation, and cherish hope within, though surrounded with many miseries. It follows, —

Good it is when he hopes and waits quietly
For the salvation of Jehovah.

The ו may often be rendered when. This verse, the preceding, and following, begin with “good,” which renders the passage very striking, —

25.Good is Jehovah to him who waits for him,
To the soul who seeks him:

26.Good it is when he hopes and waits quietly
For the salvation of Jehovah:

27.Good it is for man
That he bears the yoke in his youth.

Ed


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Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Lamentations 3:26". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/lamentations-3.html. 1840-57.

James Nisbet's Church Pulpit Commentary

HOPE AND PATIENCE

‘It is good that a man should both hope and quietly wait for the salvation of the Lord.’

Lamentations 3:26

The organ at Freiburg, one of the most beautiful in the world, after the storm has vented itself, breaks into an exquisitely sweet refrain, ‘The Song of the Cows’; and in this portion of his Lamentations, the prophet breaks forth into one of the most lovely passages in the Bible, each clause of which is well worthy of prayerful heed. To all who are passing through times of anxiety, to those who are nervously awaiting cablegram or letter, to any to whom this day is one of fateful importance because it will bring the verdict of the physician or the results of the examination, we would reiterate the prophet’s advice.

I. It is good, because anxiety is useless.—It only wastes the nervous tissue, hinders quiet sleep, and unfits for the hour when decision and action will be required. How often, after days and hours of fearful suspense, during which we have conjured up the worst possible explanations or anticipations, we have discovered that none of them were true, and that all our forebodings were groundless. Anxiety kills; it is good to hope and wait and trust.

II. It is good, because we have a good God, Who is working for us.—‘The Lord is good unto them that wait for Him, to the soul that seeketh Him.’ He is behind the scenes, bringing up reinforcements, making all things work together for good, and working for those who wait for Him. He is doing better for you than the tenderest or wisest friend.

III. It is good, because the calm, strong heart inspires confidence.—If you are perturbed and flurried, you will spread a nervous dread in those who surround you and see your careworn looks. Cast your burden on the Lord, leave it with Him, anoint your head with the oil of joy, and come out to be a Greatheart to Mr. Fearing and Miss Much-afraid.

Illustration

‘The little herb Patience does not grow in everybody’s garden. But we are admonished to seek it, because (1) it is a very precious virtue, and a part of the service we owe to God, according to the first table. (2) It contains in itself another virtue, namely, hope in God. (3) It is easier for us to practise it, if we accustom ourselves to it from our youth. (4) It can overcome many wrongs, abuses, and outrages. (5) Misfortune will not continue for ever (Isaiah 54:7). (6) At all events, the end will be favourable. (7) God does not willingly afflict us (from His heart), but always designs something different and better for us, and dearly wishes that He might not punish us at all (Hosea 11:9).’


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Bibliography
Nisbet, James. "Commentary on Lamentations 3:26". Church Pulpit Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cpc/lamentations-3.html. 1876.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Lamentations 3:26 [It is] good that [a man] should both hope and quietly wait for the salvation of the LORD.

Ver. 26. It is good that a man should both hope and quietly wait.] Heb., Be silent: not with a pythagoric or monastic silence, ut non liceat loqui locis et horis certis, but with a humble submission to God’s holy will, a patient and peaceable behaviour under his hand; waiting for a good use thereof, and a gracious issue in the best time - to frame the heart whereunto, Aurea his subnectitur sententia.


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Lamentations 3:26". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/lamentations-3.html. 1865-1868.

Sermon Bible Commentary

Lamentations 3:26

I. The first thing is to understand what is meant by "the salvation of the Lord." The salvation of the Lord here is something else than the first view which a sinful man obtains of pardon and peace, through "the great God our Saviour." It is the salvation which a man needs in any crisis of life, where he suffers under trial or is threatened with it. And, in those trials, hope and quiet waiting do not come at once into their fullest exercise. As long as human means can avail, it is a man's duty, trusting to Divine help, to employ them. The salvation of the Lord is when all conceivable means have been employed and have failed.

II. The second thing is to consider what is meant by these exercises of the soul towards God's salvation, "to hope and quietly to wait." (1) Hope: (a) The foundation of hope may be said to lie in desire. It differs from desire in this, that desire pursues many things that can never be objects of hope to us. We can only hope for that which is felt to be possible and reasonable. This, then, is the first thing for us to do, if we would strengthen hope, to see that its objects are right and good—that is, accordant with the Divine will and beneficial for us; we may learn this by consulting God's word and our own thoughtful experience. (b) The next element in Christian hope is faith. Hope differs from faith in this, that we believe in many things in regard to which we do not hope. Hope is faith with desire pointing out the objects. (c) There is a third element to be added to make our hope strong—that of imagination. (2) "Quiet waiting," or patience. It is the part of hope to seek the future; it is the duty of patience to rest calmly in the present and not to fret. Patience is strengthened (a) by faith, (b) by contentment, (c) by calm attention to duties.

III. Consider the benefit of uniting these—"It is good both to hope and quietly to wait." (1) The one is needful to save the other from sinking into sin. (2) The one is needful to raise the other to its full strength. We shall find increasingly, "how good it is." (a) It is good now in the depth of the soul—in the conscious assurance that it is better to rest in the hardest of God's ways than to wander at will in our own. (b) We shall find how good it is in the enhancement of every blessing for which we have to wait.

J. Ker, Sermons, p. 347.



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Bibliography
Nicoll, William R. "Commentary on Lamentations 3:26". "Sermon Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/sbc/lamentations-3.html.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Good here either signifies honestum, what becomes men, and is their duty; or utile, what is profitable, and will turn to good account to them. Hoping and waiting differ but as the mother and daughter, hope being the mother of patience and waiting; or as the habit and act, hoping and waiting being ranch the same, flowing from a gracious power and habit given the soul to wait. Quietness is necessary to waiting, for all turbulency and impatience of spirit under sad providences is opposed to waiting. The salvation of the Lord refers to the outward man, in preserving or delivering us from dangers; or to the soul and inward man, in preserving us from, and delivering our souls out of, dangers they fear, or evils they are pressed with. Now for a man in the midst of all evils to hope in God, and, without turbulence or disorder in himself, to wait for a preservation from, or a delivery out of, any evils, is what becometh a man, (a child of God especially,) and will turn to a good account to them.


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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Lamentations 3:26". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/lamentations-3.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

26. Hope and quietly wait, etc. — More literally, It is good both to wait and be silent=silently wait. Keil renders it: It is good that he should wait, and in silence too, for the help of God. The point is, that he should not only wait, but abstain from murmurings and repinings. This also prepares for the thought of the following verse, for he who has patiently submitted to sufferings in his youth will not readily sink in despair in old age, but will be likely to exercise himself in a calm waiting on God.


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Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Lamentations 3:26". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/lamentations-3.html. 1874-1909.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

quietly wait = wait, and he silent.


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Lamentations 3:26". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/lamentations-3.html. 1909-1922.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(26) Quietly wait.—Literally, wait in silence: i.e. abstain from murmurs and complaints.


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Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Lamentations 3:26". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/lamentations-3.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

It is good that a man should both hope and quietly wait for the salvation of the LORD.
good
Psalms 52:9; 54:6; 73:28; 92:1; Galatians 4:18
hope
Hebrews 3:14; 10:35; 1 Peter 1:13
quietly
Genesis 49:18; Exodus 14:13; 2 Chronicles 20:17; Psalms 37:7,34; 119:166,174; 130:5; Isaiah 30:7,15

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Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Lamentations 3:26". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/lamentations-3.html.

Commentary by J.C.Philpot on select texts of the Bible

Lamentations 3:26

"It is good that a man should both hope and quietly wait for the salvation of the Lord." Lamentations 3:26

The Lord does not bring his poor and needy children to a throne of grace, and send them away as soon as they have come. But his purpose Isaiah , to show them deeply what they are, to make them value his favors, to sink them lower and lower in self, that they may rise higher and higher in Christ, to "teach them to profit" (as the Scripture speaks), to write his laws upon their hearts in lines of the Spirit"s drawing, in deep lines, "engraved with an iron pen and lead in the rock forever;" not characters traced out in the sand, to be washed out by the rising tide, or effaced by the wind, but in characters as permanent as the soul itself.

The work of the Spirit in the hearts of the redeemed is radical work, work that goes to the very bottom; nothing flimsy, nothing superficial, nothing which can be effaced and obliterated springs from him, but that which shall have an abiding effect—that which shall last for eternity. The Lord is fitting his people for eternity, and therefore his work in them is thorough work; it goes right through them; it leaves nothing covered up and masked over, but turns all up from the very bottom, "discovering the foundation unto the neck" ( Habakkuk 3:13), and doing in a man spiritually what the Lord threatened to do in Jerusalem literally, "I will wipe Jerusalem as a man wipes a dish, wiping it, and turning it upside down" ( 2 Kings 21:13).

Therefore he does not answer the prayers of his children immediately when they come to his throne of mercy and grace, but rather he deepens those convictions that he has implanted; he makes the burdens heavier that he has put upon their back; he hides himself instead of discovering himself, and draws back further instead of coming nearer. Now this is intended to make them wait with greater earnestness, with more unreserved simplicity, with more absolute dependence upon him and him alone to communicate the blessing, with greater separation of heart from all the strength of the creature, with a firmer resolution in the soul to cast away all its own righteousness, and to hang solely and wholly upon the Spirit"s teachings, and Jesus" sweet revelation of himself.


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Bibliography
Philpot, Joseph Charles. "Commentary on Lamentations 3:26". Commentary by J.C.Philpot on select texts of the Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jcp/lamentations-3.html.

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