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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Lamentations 3:28

 

 

Let him sit alone and be silent Since He has laid it on him.

Adam Clarke Commentary

He sitteth alone - He has learned that necessary lesson of independence, that shows him how he is to serve himself; to give no trouble to others; and keep his troubles, as far as possible, in his own bosom.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Lamentations 3:28". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/lamentations-3.html. 1832.

Coffman's Commentaries on the Bible

"Let him sit alone and keep silence,

because he hath laid it upon him.

Let him put his mouth in the dust,

if so be there may be hope.

Let him give his cheek to him that smiteth him;

let him be filled full with reproach.

For the Lord will not cast off forever.

For though he cause grief, yet will he have compassion

according to the multitude of his lovingkindness.

For he doth not afflict willingly,

nor grieve the children of men."

Jeremiah repeatedly warned Israel to accept their captivity as something the nation deserved and for them to submit to Babylonian rule; and these are exactly the sentiments which are included in these verses.

"Let him keep silence ... put his mouth in the dust ... give his cheek (to the smiter) ... and be filled with reproach" (Lamentations 3:29-30). We paraphrase. Let Israel not rebel, let them humble themselves, let them turn the other cheek and accept their punishment.

Why should Israel submit?

"The Lord will not cast off forever" (Lamentations 3:31). Jeremiah himself had told them their captivity would end in seventy years. There was from the beginning of it, a projected end of Israel's captivity.

"Though he cause grief, yet will he have compassion" (Lamentations 3:32). God's love of Israel and his love for all men were not diminished by his drastic punishment of Israel.

"He doth not afflict willingly" (Lamentations 3:33). God was greatly grieved at the necessity of Israel's captivity. He destroyed their evil kingdom and sent the people to Babylon as a last resort, the only way possible to preserve that `righteous remnant' who, in time, would deliver the Messiah to mankind.

Note that these three verses give three reasons why Israel should meekly submit to the will of God in their terrible punishment.


Copyright Statement
James Burton Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.

Bibliography
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Lamentations 3:28". "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/lamentations-3.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

He sitteth alone,.... Retires from the world, and the men of it, who takes upon him the yoke of Christ; though he is not alone, but God, Father, Son, and Spirit, are with him; and he is with the saints, the excellent of the earth, and has communion with them; and so he is that under the afflicting hand of God bears it patiently, and does not run from place to place complaining of it, but sits still, and considers the cause, end, and use of it. Some render the words in connection with the preceding, it is good "that he sit alone"F2ישב בדד "ut sedeat solus", Gataker. ; it is good for a man to be alone; in his closet, praying to God; in his house or chamber, reading the word of God; in the field, or elsewhere, meditating upon it, and upon the works of God, of nature, providence, and grace:

and keepeth silence, because he hath borne it on him: or, "took it on him"; either because he took it upon him willingly, and therefore should bear it patiently; or because he (God) hath put it upon himF3נטל עליו "projecit super ipsum", Tigurine version; "sub. Dominus", Vatablus; "quod imposuerit ipsi Deus", Junius & Tremellius, Michaelis. , and therefore should be silent, and not murmur and repine, since he hath done it, Psalm 39:9.


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Lamentations 3:28". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/lamentations-3.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

He sitteth alone n and keepeth silence, because he hath borne [it] upon him.

(n) He murmurs not against God, but is patient.

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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Lamentations 3:28". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/lamentations-3.html. 1599-1645.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

He sitteth alone and keepeth silence, because he hath borne it upon him.

Borne it — That he keep his soul in subjection to God, because God hath humbled him by his rod.


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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Lamentations 3:28". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/lamentations-3.html. 1765.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

Here he shews the fruit of teachableness; for when God deals severely with his children, they yet do not rebel, but even then they willingly submit to his authority. For whence comes it that so much impatience rages in men, except that they know not what it is to obey God, to prepare themselves to bear the yoke? so, then, men become furious like wild beasts, never tamed, therefore the Prophet now says, “Whosoever is thus habituated to the yoke of God, will also be silent in extreme evils, and remain quiet.” We now perceive what I have just said, that the fruit of docility and obedience is set forth in this verse.

But when he says that those who are thus trained to obey God will sit apart, he expresses most fitly the strength and character of patience. For they for the most part who wish to appear magnanimous make a great display, and think that their valor is nothing except they appear as on a theater; they allow themselves at the same time an unbridled liberty when they are alone; for they who seem the most valorous, except God’s fear and true religion prevail in their souls, rage against God and champ the bridle in adversities, though they may not make a clamor before men, for, as I have already said, they regard display. But here a very different account is given of patience, even that we are to sit alone and be silent, that is, even were no one present as a witness, whose presence might make us ashamed; were we even then to sit, and to submit with calm minds to God, and to take his yoke, we should thus prove our patience. This verse then distiguishes between the simplicity of the godly and that will display in which they delight who seek to obtain the praise of courage, patience, and perseverance, from the world; for these also sit and speak words as from heaven, and as though they had put off the flesh. He who has lost a son will say, that he had begotten a mortal: he who is stripped of all his goods will say, “All my things I carry with me.” Thus magnanimously do ungodly men speak, so that they seem to surpass in fortitude and firmness all the children of God. But when they give utterance to these swelling words, what they regard is the opinion which men may form of them. But the faithful, what do they do? They sit apart, that is, though they might shamelessly clamor against God, yet they are quiet and submit to his will. We now understand what is meant by sitting apart.

Then he says, because he will carry it on himself Some take נטל nuthel, in a transitive sense, “he will cast it upon him.” But this is a forced rendering. It would be a simpler meaning, were we to say, because he will carry or raise it on himself. The verb נטל, nuthel, means not only to carry, but also elevate or raise up. When, therefore, the Prophet says, that it is an example of real patience when we carry it on ourselves, he means that we succumb not under our adversities, nor are overwhelmed by them; for it is patience when it is not grievous to us to undergo any burdens which God may lay on us; and on this account we are said to regard his yoke as not grievous — how so? because it is pleasant to us. As, then, meekness thus extenuates the heaviness of the burden, which would otherwise overwhelm us, the Prophet says that those who raise up on themselves all their troubles sit apart.

I do not, however, know whether this passage has been corrupted; for the expression seems not to me natural. Were we to read עלו, olu, his yoke, it would be more appropriate, and a reason would be given for what goes before, that the faithful sit apart and are silent before God, because they bear his yoke; for the pronoun may be referred to God as well as to man. But this is only a conjecture. (186) It follows, —


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These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Lamentations 3:28". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/lamentations-3.html. 1840-57.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Lamentations 3:28 He sitteth alone and keepeth silence, because he hath borne [it] upon him.

Ver. 28. He sitteth alone.] Sessio solitaria, as being much in meditation, according to that counsel of the preacher, "in the day of adversity consider."

And keepeth silence.] When God’s hand is upon his back, his hand is upon his mouth. See on Lamentations 3:26.

Because he hath borne it upon him.] Or, When he hath taken it upon him; taken up his cross, as being active in suffering.


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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Lamentations 3:28". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/lamentations-3.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Lamentations 3:28. Because he hath borne it upon him When he shall take up his yoke. Houbigant.


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Bibliography
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Lamentations 3:28". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/lamentations-3.html. 1801-1803.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Our English Annotations supplying that, makes the connexion clear, It is good for a man that he sit alone, Jeremiah 15:17; not doing what he doth to be seen of men, but sitting alone, and when he is alone suppressing the mutinies of his spirit, and keeping his soul in subjection to God; because God hath humbled him by his rod, humbling himself to his will.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Lamentations 3:28". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/lamentations-3.html. 1685.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

Such a person should bear his burden without complaining since God has placed it on him (cf. Psalm 39:2; Psalm 94:17).


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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on Lamentations 3:28". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/lamentations-3.html. 2012.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Himself, with perfect resignation.


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These files are public domain.
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Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Lamentations 3:28". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/lamentations-3.html. 1859.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(28) He sitteth alone . . .—Better, Let him sit alone, and keep silence when He (Jehovah) hath laid it (the yoke) upon him; and so in the next verses, Let him put his mouth . . . Let him give his cheek.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Lamentations 3:28". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/lamentations-3.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

He sitteth alone and keepeth silence, because he hath borne it upon him.
2:10; Psalms 39:9; 102:7; Jeremiah 15:17

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These files are public domain.
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Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Lamentations 3:28". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/lamentations-3.html.

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