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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Lamentations 3:43

 

 

You have covered Yourself with anger And pursued us; You have slain and have not spared.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

In verses 43-66, far from pardoning, God is still actively punishing His people.

Rather, “Thou hast covered” Thyself “with wrath and pursued (Lamentations 1:3 note) us.” The covering (here and in Lamentations 3:44) is that of clothing and enwrapping.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Lamentations 3:43". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/lamentations-3.html. 1870.

Coffman's Commentaries on the Bible

IV

ISRAEL'S SUFFERINGS FROM THEIR TRANSGRESSIONS[36]

"Thou hast covered with anger and pursued us;

thou hast slain, thou hast not pitied.

Thou hast covered thyself with a cloud,

so that no prayer can pass through.

Thou hast made us an offscouring

and a refuse in the midst of the peoples.

All our enemies have opened their mouth wide against us.

Fear and the pit are come upon us,

devastation and destruction.

Mine eye runneth down with streams of water,

for the destruction of the daughter of my people."

"All our enemies have opened their mouth wide against us" (Lamentations 3:46). This paragraph is a repetition, largely, of previous proclamations of Israel's sorrow. For example, this verse repeats verbatim Lamentations 2:16.

"Fear and the pit" (Lamentations 3:47). The metaphor in these three words is made literal in the last three words of the verse.


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James Burton Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.

Bibliography
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Lamentations 3:43". "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/lamentations-3.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Thou hast covered with anger,.... Either himself; not as a tender father, that cannot bear to see the affliction of a child; this does not suit with anger; but rather as one greatly displeased, in whose face anger appears, being covered with it; or who covers his face with it, that he may not be seen, withdrawing his gracious presence; or hast put anger as a wall between thee and us, as Jarchi: so that there was no coming nigh to him: or else it means covering his people with it; so the Targum,

"thou hast covered "us" with anger;'

denoting the largeness and abundance of afflictions upon them; they were as it were covered with them, as tokens of the divine displeasure; one wave and billow after another passing over them. Sanctius thinks the allusion is to the covering of the faces of condemned malefactors, as a token of their being guilty:

and persecuted us; the Targum adds, in captivity; that is, pursued and followed us with fresh instances of anger and resentment; to have men to be persecutors is bad, but to have God to be a persecutor is dreadful:

thou hast slain, thou hast not pitied; had suffered them to be stain by the sword of the enemy, and had shown no compassion to them; See Gill on Lamentations 2:21; here, and in some following verses, the prophet, or the people he represents, are got to complaining again; though before he had checked himself for it; so hard it is under afflictions to put in practice what should be done by ourselves and others.


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Lamentations 3:43". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/lamentations-3.html. 1999.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

At the first view, this complaint may seem to proceed from a bitter heart; for here the faithful complain that they had been slain, and then that God had executed his judgment as it were in darkness, without any indulgence; and the next verse confirms the same thing. But it is a simple acknowledgment of God’s righteous vengeance for in their extreme calamities the faithful could not declare that God dealt mercifully with them, for they had been subjected to extreme rigor, as we have before seen. Had they said that they had been leniently chastised, it would have been very strange, for the temple had been burnt, the city had been demolished, the kingdom had been overthrown, the people for the most part had been driven into exile, the remainder had been scattered, the covenant of God had been in a manner abolished; for it could not have been thought otherwise according to the judgment of the flesh. Had, then, the exiles in Chaldea said that God had smitten them leniently, would not such an extenuation have appeared very strange? and had also the Prophet spoken in the same strain? For the causes of sorrow were almost innumerable: every one had been robbed of his goods; then there were many widows, many orphans; but the chief causes of sorrow were the burning of the temple and the ruin of the kingdom. No wonder, then, that the faithful set forth here their aggravated evils: but yet they seek out no other cause than their own sins.

Hence they say now, that God had covered them over in wrath It is a most suitable metaphor; as though he had said, that God had executed his vengeance in thick darkness. For an object presented to the eye produces sympathy, and we are easily inclined to mercy when a sad spectacle is presented to us. Hence it is, that even the most savage enemies are sometimes softened, for they are led by their eyes to acts of humanity. The Prophet, then, in order to set forth the horrible vengeance of God, says that there had been a covering introduced, so that God had punished the wicked people in an implacable manner. But as I have said, he does not charge God with cruelty, though he says that he had covered them over in wrath. (196)

He then says, Thou hast pursued us and killed us, and hast not spared They intimate, in short, that God had been a severe judge; but they at the same time turned to themselves and sought there the cause, even that they might not, by their own hardness, provoke God against themselves, as hypocrites are wont to do. And the consciousness of evil leads us also to repentance; for whence is it that men grow torpid in their sins, except that they flatter themselves? When, therefore, God suspends his judgments, or when he moderates them, and does not punish men as they deserve, then, if there be any repentance, it is yet frigid, and soon vanishes. This, then, is the reason why God inflicts deadly strokes, because we feel not his hand except the stroke be as it were deadly. As, then, simple chastisement is not sufficient to lead us to repentance, the Prophet introduces the faithful as speaking thus, “Behold, thou hast in wrath covered us over, so as not to look on us,” so that there might be no opportunity for mercy, that is, that they might be the judges of themselves, and conclude from the atrocity of their punishment how grievously they must have provoked the wrath of God. It follows in the same sense, —

Thou hast in wrath enclosed and chased us,
Thou hast slain and not spared.

Then the same verb begins the next verse, —

Thou hast enclosed thyself in a cloud,
That prayer might not pass through.

Ed


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Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Lamentations 3:43". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/lamentations-3.html. 1840-57.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Lamentations 3:43 Thou hast covered with anger, and persecuted us: thou hast slain, thou hast not pitied.

Ver. 43. Thou hast covered with anger.] Overwhelmed us with thy judgments. None out of hell have ever suffered more than the saints: they have felt the sad effects of displeased love.


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Lamentations 3:43". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/lamentations-3.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Lamentations 3:43. Thou hast covered with anger, &c.— Thou hast fenced about with anger. The verb סכךֶ sakak appears to have this sense, Job 3:23; Job 10:11; Job 38:8. There seems to be a manifest allusion to the manner of hunting wild beasts in the eastern countries, by surrounding at first a large tract of ground with toils, which the beasts could not break through; and these being drawn in by degrees, the bears were driven into a narrower space, where they were killed with darts and javelins, at the will of the hunters. See Bishop Lowth's Note on Isaiah 24:17-18. Statius gives a description, exactly similar, of the method of inclosing wild beasts in toils or nets; Achill. l. 459.


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Bibliography
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Lamentations 3:43". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/lamentations-3.html. 1801-1803.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Thou hast covered with anger; either thou hast covered thyself with anger, or covered thy own face with anger, so as not to look upon us to move thy pity; or (which is more probably the sense) thou hast covered, that is, overwhelmed, us with thy wrath. Thou hast slain, thou hast not pitied; thou hast pursued us to a fatal ruin, without showing us any pity.


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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Lamentations 3:43". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/lamentations-3.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

43. Thou hast covered — That is, thyself. The verb means, not overwhelming, but clothing. The thought is the same in form with that of the following verse. As one puts on a coat of mail that he may enter the fight, so God puts on the covering of his wrath, out of which the lightnings leap forth unto destruction.


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Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Lamentations 3:43". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/lamentations-3.html. 1874-1909.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

The Lord had become angry over the sins of His people and had pursued them in judgment, slaying them without stinting.


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Bibliography
Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on Lamentations 3:43". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/lamentations-3.html. 2012.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Covered thyself, as if not to see our distress.


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Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Lamentations 3:43". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/lamentations-3.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

persecuted = pursued. Compare Psalms 35:6.


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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Lamentations 3:43". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/lamentations-3.html. 1909-1922.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(43) Thou hast covered with anger.—Better, as in the next verse, Thou hast covered thyself. Wrath is as the garment in which God wraps Himself to execute His righteous judgments. In Lamentations 3:44 the wrath is represented more definitely as a cloud through which the prayers of the afflicted cannot pass.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Lamentations 3:43". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/lamentations-3.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Thou hast covered with anger, and persecuted us: thou hast slain, thou hast not pitied.
covered
2:1; Psalms 44:19
persecuted
66; Psalms 83:15
thou hast slain
2:2,17,21; 2 Chronicles 36:16,17; Ezekiel 7:9; 8:18; 9:10

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Lamentations 3:43". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/lamentations-3.html.

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