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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Proverbs 12:11

 

 

He who tills his land will have plenty of bread, But he who pursues worthless things lacks sense.

Adam Clarke Commentary

He that tilleth his land - God's blessing will be in the labor of the honest agriculturist.

But he that followeth vain persons - He who, while he should be cultivating his ground, preparing for a future crop, or reaping his harvest, associates with fowlers, coursers of hares, hunters of foxes, or those engaged in any champaign amusements, is void of understanding; and I have known several such come to beggary.

To this verse the Septuagint add the following clause: 'ov estin en oinwn diatribaiv, en toiv eautou ocurwmasi kataleiqei atimian. "He who is a boon companion in banquets, shall leave dishonor in his own fortresses." This has been copied by the Vulgate and the Arabic. That is The man who frequents the ale-house enriches that, while he impoverishes his own habitation.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Proverbs 12:11". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/proverbs-12.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

The contrast is carried on between the life of industry and that of the idle, “vain person” of the “baser sort” (the “Raca” of Matthew 5:22). We might have expected that the second clause would have ended with such words as “shall lack bread,” but the contrast goes deeper. Idleness leads to a worse evil than that of hunger.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Proverbs 12:11". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/proverbs-12.html. 1870.

The Biblical Illustrator

Proverbs 12:11

He that tilleth his land shall be satisfied with bread.

The law of labour

It is no mercy to be freed from the law of labour. Nor is it God that frees a man from that law. Among the opulent there are some who break the law of labour, and some who keep it. They keep it by working in their own province, in that state of life into which it has pleased God to call them. There is brain-toil as well as hand-toil; the wear and tear of the mental energies tend more to shorten life than the ordinary labourer’s wear and tear of body. Some kind of labour is enjoined upon all, by a law of God’s own framing. There is division of labour, but it is a labour nevertheless. Woe to him who craves an idle life, who would slumber existence away in listless reverie! The truth of the text is forcible, whether taken literally or applied spiritually. A contrast is drawn between the industrious and the loiterer. Solomon uses the words “wise” and “foolish,” and their kindred terms, in a deep spiritual sense--moral as well as mental, religious as well as intellectual. The fool is he who acts without reference to the Divine above him, and the everlasting before him. As we dare not let things take their course in our worldly business, so neither in our spiritual. Christianity is meant to hallow life in all its phases--to hallow business, labour, recreation. The Sabbath of the Christian is a life-long Sabbath, an every-day Sabbath. Bishop Taylor reminds us that the “life of every man may be so ordered that it may be a perpetual serving of God--the greatest trouble, and most busy trade, and worldly encumbrances, when they are necessary, or charitable, or profitable, being a-doing God’s work. For God provides the good things of the world to serve the needs of nature, by the labours of the ploughman, the skill and pains of the artisan, and the dangers and traffic of the merchant. Idleness is called the sin of Sodom and her daughters, and indeed is the burial of a living man.” The text suggests two pictures. In the one we have the persevering husbandman, who loses no time, who works with a good heart, and at last enjoys a noble harvest. In the other we have a slothful spendthrift, who whiles away life’s sunshine by basking in it, leaving the evening to care for itself, and heedless of coming night. But it is important to remember that no earthly seed-corn will produce fruit for another world--therefore the seed-corn must be supplied from the heavenly storehouse by the heavenly husbandman--it must be indigenous to the skies, an exotic upon earth. If thou be in earnest for God, He will multiply thy seed sown, and increase the fruits of thy righteousness. (Francis Jacox, B.A.)

Manly industry and parasitical indolence

I. Manly industry.

1. He has manly industry indicated. Agriculture is the oldest, divinest, healthiest, and most necessary branch of human industry.

2. He has manly industry rewarded. Skilled industry is seldom in want.

II. Parasitical indolence..

1. There are those who hang on others for their support.

2. Such persons are fools. They sacrifice self-respect. They expose themselves to degrading annoyances. (Homilist.)

There is great moral value in being well employed

The idle classes are waiting to become the vicious classes. This is vividly illustrated by the well-known story of a friendless girl who, about three generations ago, was thrown upon the world, uncared for. Her children and children’s children came to number over a hundred, desperate and dangerous men and women of crime. No record of earth can tell how many a bright young man or woman thrown out of employ has become a centre of equally dark and ever-widening circles. (Washington Gladden.)

The fate of drones

It will be profitable to idle people to observe the arrangement whereby nature condemns the drones to death in the bee community. No sooner is the business of swarming ended, and the worker-bees satisfied there will be no lack of fertile queens, when issues the terrible edict for the massacre of the drones. Poor fellows! It is to be hoped they comfort themselves with the reflection that their fate is an everlasting homily, presented by nature in dogmatical but most effective fashion, of the uselessness of all who labour not for their living. If one must die for the good of one’s kind, by all means let it be as a martyr. Poor fellows! how they dart in and out, and up and down the hive, in the vain hope of escape! The workers are inexorable. (Scientific Illustrations.)


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Bibliography
Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "Proverbs 12:11". The Biblical Illustrator. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/proverbs-12.html. 1905-1909. New York.

Coffman's Commentaries on the Bible

"He that tilleth his land shall have plenty of bread; But he that followeth after vain persons is void of understanding."

It was a rural society that first received this proverb, a society in which the majority of people tilled the land for a living. The words `his land' indicates ownership or occupancy of the land. "The `vain persons' of the second clause may also be accurately rendered as `worthless pursuits.'"[17] Some make up their own proverbs, as in this: "The man who tills his land will have plenty to eat, but the stupid spends his time chasing rainbows"![18]


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James Burton Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.

Bibliography
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Proverbs 12:11". "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/proverbs-12.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

He that tilleth his land shall be satisfied with bread,.... This was man's work in innocence; this he was doomed to do with the sweat of his brow after his fall; every man has his land to till, or some calling, work, or business, to be employed in, either civil or sacred; and it becomes him to be diligent therein, and such as are shall not want bread, but shall have a sufficiency of it;

but he that followeth vain persons is void of understanding: that neglects his business, loiters away his time, spends it in the company of vain, empty, and unprofitable persons; as he shows himself by such a choice that he is void of understanding, or "wants a heart"F19חסר לב "deficiens corde", Pagninus; "carens corde", Montanus; "deficitur corde", Schultens. , to improve his time and talents; so before long it is much if he does not want a piece of bread. Thus he that is concerned to have the fallow ground of his heart ploughed up, and righteousness, truth, and holiness, sown therein, that it may bring forth fruit; or who is careful about the welfare and salvation of his immortal soul, and makes diligent use of all means to promote its spiritual good, shall be filled with the bread of life, shall find it and eat it, to the joy and rejoicing of his heart; and, on the contrary, he that associates himself with vain persons, empty of all that is spiritually good, that have only empty notions of religion; or who attend to the profane and vain boastings of antichrist, and all false teachers; and give heed to seducing spirits and doctrines of devils, whose words eat as do a canker; these, as they show themselves to want wisdom, so they are and will be brought into starving and famishing circumstances in a spiritual sense. Jarchi interprets the former clause of a man that is studious in his doctrine, that revolves it in his mind, that he may not forget it; and the Arabic version renders the last clause,

"they that run after false demons, their minds are deficient;'

see Revelation 9:20.


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Proverbs 12:11". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/proverbs-12.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

The idler‘s fate is the result of indolence and want of principle (Proverbs 6:32; Proverbs 7:7).


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This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Proverbs 12:11". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/proverbs-12.html. 1871-8.

Keil & Delitzsch Commentary on the Old Testament

11 He that tilleth his own ground is satisfied with bread,

And he that followeth after vain pursuits is devoid of understanding.

Yet more complete is the antithetic parallelism in the doublette, Proverbs 28:19 (cf. also Sir. 20:27a). The proverb recommends the cultivation of the field as the surest means of supporting oneself honestly and abundantly, in contrast to the grasping after vain, i.e. , unrighteous means of subsistence, windy speculations, and the like (Fl.). ריקים are here not persons (Bertheau), but things without solidity and value (lxx μάταια ; Aquila, Theodotion, κενά ), and, in conformity with the contrast, not real business. Elsewhere also the mas. plur. discharges the function of a neut. noun of multitude, vid ., נגידים , principalia , Proverbs 8:6, and זדים , Psalms 19:14 - one of the many examples of the imperfect use of the gender in Hebr.; the speaker has in ריקים , vana et inania , not אנשׁים (Judges 9:4), but דברים (Deuteronomy 32:47) in view. The lxx erroneously at Proverbs 28:19, and Symmachus and Jerome at both places understand ריקים of slothfulness.


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Bibliography
Keil, Carl Friedrich & Delitzsch, Franz. "Commentary on Proverbs 12:11". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/kdo/proverbs-12.html. 1854-1889.

Matthew Henry's Complete Commentary on the Bible

Note, 1. It is men's wisdom to mind their business and follow an honest calling, for that is the way, by the blessing of God, to get a livelihood: He that tills his land, of which he is either the owner or the occupant, that keeps to his word and is willing to take pains, if he do not raise an estate by it (what need is there of that?), yet he shall be satisfied with bread, shall have food convenient for himself and his family, enough to bear his charges comfortably through the world. Even the sentence of wrath has this mercy in it, Thou shalt eat bread, though it be in the sweat of thy face. Cain was denied this, Genesis 4:12. Be busy, and that is the true way to be easy. Keep thy shop and thy shop will keep thee. Thou shalt eat the labour of thy hands. 2. It is men's folly to neglect their business. Those are void of understanding that do so, for then they fall in with idle companions and follow them in their evil courses, and so come to want bread, at least bread of their own, and make themselves burdensome to others, eating the bread out of other people's mouths.


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Bibliography
Henry, Matthew. "Complete Commentary on Proverbs 12:11". "Matthew Henry Complete Commentary on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mhm/proverbs-12.html. 1706.

Matthew Henry's Concise Commentary on the Bible

It is men's wisdom to mind their business, and follow an honest calling. But it is folly to neglect business; and the grace of God teaches men to disdain nothing but sin.


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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Henry, Matthew. "Concise Commentary on Proverbs 12:11". "Matthew Henry Concise Commentary

on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mhn/proverbs-12.html. 1706.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

He that tilleth his land shall be satisfied with bread: but he that followeth vain persons is void of understanding.

Tilleth — That employs his time in an honest calling.

Vain persons — In an idle course of living.


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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Proverbs 12:11". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/proverbs-12.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Proverbs 12:11 He that tilleth his land shall be satisfied with bread: but he that followeth vain [persons is] void of understanding.

Ver. 11. He that tilleth his land shall be satisfied, &c.] This is true of all other lawful callings, manual or mental, - the sweat of the brow or of the brain. Sin brought in sweat, [Genesis 3:19] and now not to sweat increaseth sin. Men must earn their bread before they eat it, [2 Thessalonians 3:12] and be diligent in their callings to serve God and men, themselves and others, with the fatness and sweetness thereof, and then they have a promise they shall be fed. [Psalms 37:7]

But he that followeth vain persons, &c.] It is hard to be a good fellow and a good husband too. Qui aequo animo malis immiscetur, malus est, saith one, He that delights in bad company cannot be good.


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Proverbs 12:11". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/proverbs-12.html. 1865-1868.

The Popular Commentary by Paul E. Kretzmann

v. 11. He that tilleth his land shall be satisfied with bread, his industry ordinarily being rewarded in this manner; but he that followeth vain persons, vanity, idleness, laziness, is void of understanding, lacks the very principles of ordinary common sense.


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Kretzmann, Paul E. Ph. D., D. D. "Commentary on Proverbs 12:11". "Kretzmann's Popular Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/kpc/proverbs-12.html. 1921-23.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Proverbs 12:11. He that tilleth, &c.— The LXX add to this verse, He that taketh a pleasure in taverns, shall leave disgrace in his own fortresses.


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Bibliography
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Proverbs 12:11". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/proverbs-12.html. 1801-1803.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

That tilleth his land; that employeth his time and strength in an honest calling.

That followeth vain persons; that useth their society and idle course of living.

Is void of understanding; shall through his own folly want bread.


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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Proverbs 12:11". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/proverbs-12.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

11. Satisfied with bread — Shall have plenty.

Vain persons ריקים, (rekim,) the raca of Matthew 5:22. Idle, profligate, empty-pated men; those who frequent saloons, taverns, ale houses, and other dissolute places, when they should be ploughing, or otherwise earning an honest living. The Septuagint here adds a proverb not in the Hebrew which is worthy of preservation: “He that enjoys himself (or spends his time) in banquets of wine, shall leave dishonour in his own strongholds.” The idea is, that he shall leave a heritage of dishonour to his household. Compare Proverbs 28:19; Genesis 3:19.


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Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Proverbs 12:11". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/proverbs-12.html. 1874-1909.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

Proverbs 12:11. He that tilleth his land — That employeth his time and strength in an honest calling; shall be satisfied with bread — Shall, through the blessing of God, have food convenient for himself and his family; but he that followeth vain persons — That associates with them, and follows their idle course of living; is void of understanding — Will find at last, by the desperate courses into which they will lead him, that he wants not only bread; but understanding.


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Bibliography
Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on Proverbs 12:11". Joseph Benson's Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/proverbs-12.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Idleness. Hebrew, "the idle." Their company is seducing. --- He that, &c. This occurs in the Septuagint, but not in the Hebrew or the new edition of St. Jerome. (Calmet) --- Wine. Or "in taverns." --- Holds. Soldiers have thus been often surprised. (Menochius) --- "Drunkenness is an incitement to lust and madness, the poison of wisdom." (St. Ambrose)


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Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Proverbs 12:11". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/proverbs-12.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

shall be satisfied. Illustrations: Isaac (Genesis 26:12); Jacob (Genesis 31:40; Genesis 32:10).

he that followeth, &c. Illustrations: Abimelech"s followers (Judges 9. Compare Proverbs 24:21); Theudas (Acts 5:36, Acts 5:37).

understanding. Hebrew "heart", put by Figure of speech Metonymy (of Subject), App-6, for sense. Septuagint adds: "He that delighteth himself in the drinking of wine shall leave his own stronghold a disgrace. "


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Proverbs 12:11". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/proverbs-12.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

He that tilleth his land shall be satisfied with bread: but he that followeth vain persons is void of understanding.

He that tilleth his land shall be satisfied with bread. The occupation must be an honest one, such as agriculture, and one must labour diligently at it. One must not put his sickle into his neighbour's harvest.

But he that followeth vain persons is void of understanding. "Vain persons," i:e., idlers (2 Samuel 6:20): such as love vanity, shrink from honest labour, delight in sleep, indolence, play, and idle talk. We must withdraw from the company of such (2 Thessalonians 3:6; 2 Thessalonians 3:11-12). Being "void of understanding," they, as a necessary consequence, are void of "bread," as contrasted with "He that tilleth his land," who therefore "shall be satisfied with bread."


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Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Proverbs 12:11". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/proverbs-12.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(11) Vain persons.—Or, things, such as “searching for hid treasures” (Proverbs 2:4).


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Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Proverbs 12:11". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/proverbs-12.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

He that tilleth his land shall be satisfied with bread: but he that followeth vain persons is void of understanding.
tilleth
13:23; 14:4,23; 27:27; 28:19; Genesis 3:19; Psalms 128:2; Ephesians 4:28; 1 Thessalonians 4:11,12; 2 Thessalonians 3:8
he that followeth
1:10-19; 4:14,15; 6:32; 7:7; 9:6,13,16; 13:20; Judges 9:4; Psalms 26:4; Jonah 2:8; Titus 1:10,11

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Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Proverbs 12:11". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/proverbs-12.html.

Preacher's Complete Homiletical Commentary

CRITICAL NOTES.—

Pro . Vain persons, or "vanity," "emptiness."

MAIN HOMILETICS OF Pro

SATISFACTION FROM TILLAGE

I. Satisfaction as the result of tillage depends—

1. Upon the performance of a Divine promise. It is long ago since God gave to Noah the promise that "While the earth remaineth, seedtime and harvest, and cold and heat, and summer and winter, and day and night shall not cease" (Gen ), and it has been so invariably fulfilled that men have come to forget upon whom they are depending—in whom they are exercising faith—when they plough the ground and sow the seed. God's regularity in His performance has bred in men a contempt for the promise and the promise maker. Men speak of the laws of nature and ignore the fact that it is by the Word of the Lord that the "rain cometh down and the snow from heaven, and returneth not thither, but watereth the earth, and maketh it bring forth and bud, that it may give seed to the sower and bread to the eater" (Isa 55:10). But so it is. The promise is the power that set the laws in motion at first and that have kept them in motion ever since. There can be no tillage without dependence upon God either acknowledged or unacknowledged. The promise is an absolute one, and implies power in God to fulfil it to the end of time. It can never fail unless God's power fail, or unless He break His word; these are blessed impossibilities with Him. Therefore, so far as God is concerned the shall of the text is absolute. But it depends likewise—

2. Upon men's fulfilment of their duties. First, it is not all tillage that will satisfy a man with bread, the tillage must be painstaking and intelligent. The promise of God does not set aside the necessity for the man to be very laborious and to study carefully the nature and needs of the soil which he tills. Agriculture is a science which must be acquired—a man must learn how to till the ground. God claims to be man's instructor in this matter (Isa ). Then, again, it must be his land that he tills, not land taken by fraud or violence from another. Neither if a man tills the land of another as his servant is he always paid sufficient wages to be satisfied with bread. But this is the greed of man interfering with God's ordinaton.

II. The promise suggests symbolic teaching. We may look at it in relation to the human spirit. As land must be ploughed and sown with painstaking intelligence if a man is to have the satisfaction of reaping a harvest, so the human soul must be the object of spiritual tillage if it is ever to yield any satisfaction to God or man. There is very much to be got out of the land, but no man can obtain the full blessing unless he cultivate it. So it is with the man himself. A human soul left to lie barren can never become as a "field which the Lord hath blessed."

(1) It must be prepared to receive the words of God. The "fallow ground" must be broken up, lest the sowing be "among thorns" (Jer ), or the seed fall where it can find no entrance (Hos 10:12; Mat 13:4).

(2) Good seed must be sown. The word of God (Mar ), that "incorruptible seed" by which men are "born again" (1Pe 1:23).

(3) And the spiritual sower must be persevering and prayerful. It is true of natural tillage that "He that observeth the wind shall not sow; and he that regardeth the clouds shall not reap" (Ecc ); it is equally so of soul-husbandry. The world, the flesh, and the devil will be always putting difficulties in the way of a man's caring for his "own soul." But these obstacles must be surmounted, and if the seed is watered by prayer God will assuredly send down the rain of the Holy Ghost.

(4) And in spiritual tillage there is also a certainty of satisfaction. This also depends upon not one Divine promise but upon many—upon the revelation of God as a whole. (Upon the opposite character—him "that followeth vain persons," or vanity, instead of tilling his land or his spiritual nature—see Homiletics on chapters Pro and Pro 10:5, pages 79 and 147.)

OUTLINES AND SUGGESTIVE COMMENTS

We might have expected that the antithesis of the second clause would have ended with "shall lack bread," but the real contrast goes deeper. Idleness leads to a worse evil than that of hunger.—Plumptre.

Vain persons or "empty people"—most signally the impenitent—for they are empty of all good. "That follows after empty people" is a fine characteristic of the impenitent man's decline. Following others is the commonest influence to destroy the soul.—Miller.

Special honour is given to the work of tilling the land. God assigned it to Adam in Paradise. It was the employment of his eldest son. In ancient times it was the business or relaxation of kings. A blessing is ensured to diligence, sometimes abundant, always such as we should be satisfied with.—Bridges.

Of all the arts of civilised man agriculture is transcendantly the most essential and valuable. Other arts may contribute to the comfort, the convenience, and the embellishment of life, but the cultivation of the soil stands in immediate connection with our very existence. The life itself, to whose comfort, convenience, and embellishment other arts contribute, is by this sustained, so that others without it can avail nothing.—Wardlaw.

The only two universal monarchs practised husbandry.… Some people think that they cannot have enough unless they have more than the necessaries and decent comforts of life: but we are here instructed that bread should satisfy our desires. Having food and raiment, let us be therewith content. There are few that want these, and yet few are content.… To be satisfied with bread is a happy temper of mind, and is commonly the portion of the man of industry, which not only procures bread, but gives it a relish unknown to men that are above labour.—Lawson.

Sin brought in sweat (Gen ), and now not to sweat increaseth sin.… "But he that followeth vain persons," etc. It is hard to be a good fellow and a good husband too.—Trapp.

Here is encouragement to those who travail in husbandry. They are of as good note with God for their service, if they be faithful, as others whose trades are more gainful, and better esteemed among men. The merchants, and goldsmiths, and others of such places, are not so often mentioned in Scripture as they be, nor animated with so many consolations as they are. The grand promises for blessing on their labour are made to them in special, and the rest must deduct their comforts from thence by proportion.—Dod.

In a moral point of view the life of the agriculturist is the most pure and holy of any class of men; pure, because it is the most healthful, and holy, because it brings the Deity perpetually before his view, giving him thereby the most exalted notions of supreme power, and the most fascinating and endearing view of moral benignity.—Sir B. Maltravers.

Ill fares the land, to hastening ills a prey,

Where wealth accumulates and men decay;

Princes and lords may flourish, or may fade;

A breath can make them, as a breath has made:

But a bold peasantry, their country's pride,

When once destroyed, can never be supplied.

Goldsmith.


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Bibliography
Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on Proverbs 12:11". Preacher's Complete Homiletical Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/phc/proverbs-12.html. Funk & Wagnalls Company, 1892.

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