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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Proverbs 13:10

 

 

Through insolence comes nothing but strife, But wisdom is with those who receive counsel.

Adam Clarke Commentary

By pride cometh contention - Perhaps there is not a quarrel among individuals in private life, nor a war among nations, that does not proceed from pride and ambition. Neither man nor nation will be content to be less than another; and to acquire the wished-for superiority all is thrown into general confusion, both in public and private life. It was to destroy this spirit of pride, that Jesus was manifested in the extreme of humility and humiliation among men. The salvation of Christ is a deliverance from pride, and a being clothed with humility. As far as we are humble, so far we are saved.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Proverbs 13:10". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/proverbs-13.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Either:

(1) “By pride alone comes contention” - that is the one unfailing spring of quarrels; or

(2) “By pride comes contention only” - it, and it alone, is the fruit of pride.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Proverbs 13:10". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/proverbs-13.html. 1870.

The Biblical Illustrator

Proverbs 13:10

Only by pride cometh contention, but with the well-advised is wisdom.

Pride and humility

By a proud man we mean one who esteems himself better than others; by a humble man, one who esteems others better than himself. What are the evil effects of pride?

1. It cuts off a man from all the salutary effects of reproof, rebuke, criticism, and counsel, without which it is not possible for any of us to become wise.

2. By pride comes nothing but strife, and he loveth transgression that loveth strife. It is the pride of monarchs and nations that produces war. In the affairs of private life our pride, rather than our sense of right, usually creates, fosters, and embitters divisions, alienations, and quarrels. All the foolish extravagances of social competition are to be traced to the same source. From first to last the haughty spirit is a curse and a torment to every one, and not least to itself. It is like a cold and biting wind. It breaks the heart of the humble, it excites the passions of the wrathful, it corrupts the conduct of the weak.

3. Pride is hateful to God. The proud man, whether he knows it or not, comes into direct conflict with God; he is pitting himself against the Omnipotent. If God is to dwell in a human heart at all, it must be in one which has been emptied of all pride, one which has, as it were, thrown down all the barriers of self-importance, and laid itself open to the incoming Spirit. (R. F. Horton, D. D.)

Pride and contention

When pride and passion meet on both sides, it cannot but be that a fire will be kindled; when hard flints strike together, the sparks will fly about; but a soft, mild spirit is a great preserver of its own peace, kills the power of contests, as woolpacks, or such-like soft matter, most deaden the force of bullets. (T. Leighton.)


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Bibliography
Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "Proverbs 13:10". The Biblical Illustrator. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/proverbs-13.html. 1905-1909. New York.

Coffman's Commentaries on the Bible

"By pride cometh only contention; But with the well-advised is wisdom."

"Pride engenders strife, but with the humble is wisdom."[17] "This proverb is directed against litigiousness, quarrelsomeness, and the offensive assertion of one's supposed rights, and especially, perhaps, against the obstinate pride of rival princes. Humble is used here in the sense of `unassuming.'"[18]


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James Burton Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.

Bibliography
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Proverbs 13:10". "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/proverbs-13.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Only by pride cometh contention,.... Though it comes by other things, yet by this chiefly, and there are no contentions without it: or "truly", "verily", "certainlyF4רק "certe", Vatablus; "vere", Pagninus, Montanus, Merecrus. , by pride", &c. Unless the words may be better rendered, "an empty man through pride will give contention"F5"Levis per superbiam dabit contentionam", Gejerus. , or make it; such as are empty of knowledge and wisdom; and such are generally the most proud, and are very apt to raise contentions, and foment divisions: contentions in families, in neighbourhoods, in towns, cities, and countries, and in churches, are generally owing to pride; what contentions and confusions has the pride of the pope of Rome brought into kingdoms and states, into councils, and into the church of God!

but with the well advised is wisdom: such who are humble and modest will seek counsel of God; will consult the sacred oracles, and ask advice of those who are superior to them in knowledge and understanding; and so will neither raise contentions themselves, nor join with those that make them, but do all they can to lay them; these show that true wisdom is with them.


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Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Proverbs 13:10". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/proverbs-13.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

Only by pride d cometh contention: but with the well advised [is] wisdom.

(d) When as every man contends to have preeminence, and will not give place to another.

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Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Proverbs 13:10". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/proverbs-13.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

The obstinacy which attends self-conceit, produces contention, which the well-advised, thus evincing modesty, avoid.


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This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Proverbs 13:10". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/proverbs-13.html. 1871-8.

Keil & Delitzsch Commentary on the Old Testament

10 Nothing comes by pride but contention;

But wisdom is with those who receive counsel.

The restrictive רק (only) does not, according to the sense, belong to בּזדון (by pride), but to מצּה , vid ., under Psalms 32:6 and Job 2:10. Of יתּן = there is, vid ., under Proverbs 10:24. Bertheau's “one causes” is not exact, for “one” [ man ] is the most general personal subject, but יתן is in such cases to be regarded as impersonal: by pride is always a something which causes nothing but quarrel and strife, for the root of pride is egoism. Line second is a variant to Proverbs 11:2. Bescheidenheit (modesty) is in our old [German] language exactly equivalent to Klugheit (prudence). But here the צנועים are more exactly designated as permitting themselves to be advised; the elsewhere reciprocal נועץ has here once a tolerative signification, although the reciprocal is also allowable: with such as reciprocally advise themselves, and thus without positiveness supplement each his own knowledge by means of that of another. Most interpreters regard 10b as a substantival clause, but why should not יתן be carried forward? With such as permit themselves to be advised, or are not too proud to sustain with others the relation of giving and receiving, there is wisdom, since instead of hatred comes wisdom - the peaceful fruit resulting from an interchange of views.


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Bibliography
Keil, Carl Friedrich & Delitzsch, Franz. "Commentary on Proverbs 13:10". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/kdo/proverbs-13.html. 1854-1889.

Matthew Henry's Complete Commentary on the Bible

Note, 1. Foolish pride is the great make-bate. Would you know whence come wars and fightings? They come from this root of bitterness. Whatever hand other lusts may have in contention (passion, envy, covetousness), pride has the great hand; it is its pride that it will itself sow discord and needs no help. Pride makes men impatient of contradiction in either their opinions or their desires, impatient of competition and rivalship, impatient of contempt, or any thing that looks like a slight, and impatient of concession, and receding, from a conceit of certain right and truth on their side; and hence arise quarrels among relations and neighbours, quarrels in states and kingdoms, in churches and Christian societies. Men will be revenged, will not forgive, because they are proud. 2. Those that are humble and peaceable are wise and well advised. Those that will ask and take advice, that will consult their own consciences, their Bibles, their ministers, their friends, and will do nothing rashly, are wise, as in other things, so in this, that they will humble themselves, will stoop and yield, to preserve quietness and prevent quarrels.


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Bibliography
Henry, Matthew. "Complete Commentary on Proverbs 13:10". "Matthew Henry Complete Commentary on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mhm/proverbs-13.html. 1706.

Matthew Henry's Concise Commentary on the Bible

All contentions, whether between private persons, families, churches, or nations, are begun and carried forward by pride. Disputes would be easily prevented or ended, if it were not for pride.


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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Henry, Matthew. "Concise Commentary on Proverbs 13:10". "Matthew Henry Concise Commentary

on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mhn/proverbs-13.html. 1706.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Only by pride cometh contention: but with the well advised is wisdom.

Pride — It is chiefly, pride which blows up the coals of contention.

Well-advised — Who are not governed by their passions, but by prudent considerations.

Wisdom — Which teaches them to avoid contention.


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Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Proverbs 13:10". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/proverbs-13.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Proverbs 13:10 Only by pride cometh contention: but with the well advised [is] wisdom.

Ver. 10. Only by pride cometh contention.] Heb., Dabit iurgium. Pride, if there be no cause of contention given, will make it. Transcendo, non obedio, perturbo, is the motto written upon pride’s triple crown. A proud person is full of discontent; nothing can please him. Just like one that hath a swelling in his hands, something or other toucheth it still, and driveth him to outcries. Pride maketh a man drunk with his own conceit. "The proud man" is as he that "hath transgressed by wine." [Habakkuk 2:5] And drunkards, we know, are quarrelsome. The Corinthians had riches and gifts and learning; and carried aloft by these waxen wings, they domineered and despised others; [1 Corinthians 4:8] they were divided and discontented; [1 Corinthians 3:3] and these overflowings of the gall and spleen came from a fulness of bad humour. Pride is a dividing distemper; gouty swollen legs keep at a distance; bladders blown up with wind spurt one from another, and will not close; but prick them, and you may pack a thousand of them in a little room.

But with the well advised is wisdom.] The "meekness of wisdom," as St James hath it; [James 3:13] of the which we may well say, as Tertullus said to Felix, "By thee we enjoy great quietness." [Acts 24:2] It was a great trouble to Haman to lead Mordecai’s horse, which another man would not have thought so. The moving of a straw troubleth proud flesh; whereas humility, if compelled to go one mile, will go two for a need - yea, as far as the shoes of the gospel of peace can carry it. "The wisdom from above is peaceable." [James 3:17]


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Proverbs 13:10". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/proverbs-13.html. 1865-1868.

The Popular Commentary by Paul E. Kretzmann

v. 10. Only by pride cometh contention, for those who are arrogantly ambitious always fear rivalry and therefore are always picking quarrels; but with the well-advised, those who are willing to accept counsel, is wisdom.


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Bibliography
Kretzmann, Paul E. Ph. D., D. D. "Commentary on Proverbs 13:10". "Kretzmann's Popular Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/kpc/proverbs-13.html. 1921-23.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Proverbs 13:10. Only by pride, &c.— The Greeks have a proverb, "A mountain cannot mix with a mountain," i.e. two proud men will never agree together: and the Latins have an excellent saying, Crede mihi, sapere est, non multum sapere, "Believe me; to be wise, is not to be overwise;" for they whose minds are infected with a vain opinion of themselves, either cannot see the truth, if it be opposite to their ideas; or if they do, they will not acknowledge it, for fear they should yield, and confess themselves overcome. See Bishop Patrick.


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Bibliography
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Proverbs 13:10". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/proverbs-13.html. 1801-1803.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Only by pride cometh contention; which is not to be understood exclusively as to all other causes; for contentions oft spring from ignorance, or mistake, or covetousness, or other passions: but eminently, because as pride bloweth up those coals of contention which other lusts kindle, so ofttimes pride alone, without any other cause, stirreth up strife; which it doth by making a man self-conceited in his opinions, and obstinate in his resolutions, and impatient of any opposition, and many other ways.

With the well-advised, who are not governed by their own passions, but by prudent consideration, and the good counsel of others, is wisdom; which teacheth them to avoid and abhor all contention.


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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Proverbs 13:10". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/proverbs-13.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

10. Only by pride — Such pride as prevents men from taking wise and wholesome advice.

With the well advised — those who both receive and profit by good counsel — is wisdom. On this verse Melanchthon reminds his pupils of the old Greek adage, “A mountain cannot mix with a mountain.” that is, two high-minded or proud men will never agree: but with the lowly, (comp. Proverbs 11:2,) — those sufficiently humble to be advised — is practical wisdom, or prudence in avoiding dissensions. “It is uncertain what word the ‘only’ qualities. We may have, 1. By pride alone comes contention: that is the one unfailing spring of quarrels; or, 2. By pride comes contention only: it, and it alone, is the fruit of pride. The latter construction is preferable.” — Speaker’s Commentary. The Geneva Bible version renders the first clause, “Only by pride doth man make contention,” and makes this marginal note: “Whereas every man contendeth to have the pre-eminence, and will not give place to another.”


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Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Proverbs 13:10". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/proverbs-13.html. 1874-1909.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

Proverbs 13:10. Only by pride cometh contention — This is not to be understood exclusively, as to all other causes of contention; for contentions often spring from ignorance, or mistake, or covetousness, or other passions; but eminently, because, as pride bloweth up those coals of contention, which other passions kindle, so oftentimes pride alone, without any other cause, stirreth up strife; which it doth by making a man self-conceited in his opinions, and obstinate in his resolutions, and impatient of any opposition: and many other ways; but with the well-advised — Who are not governed by their own passions, but by prudent consideration, and the good counsel of others; is wisdom — Which teacheth them to avoid and abhor all contention. “Melancthon,” says Bishop Patrick, “singled out for the observation of his scholars two remarkable sentences of this chapter, of which this is one; and upon it he reminds them of the Greek proverb, ορος ορειου μιγνυται, A mountain cannot mix with a mountain, that is, two high men will never agree together; and of another excellent saying among the Latins, Crede mihi, sapere est non multum sapere, Believe me, to be wise, is not to be over wise. For they whose minds are infected with a vain opinion of themselves, either cannot see the truth, if it be against their thoughts; or, if they do, they will not acknowledge it, for fear they should yield and confess themselves overcome.”


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Bibliography
Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on Proverbs 13:10". Joseph Benson's Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/proverbs-13.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Contentions. As none will yield. (Menochius) --- Hebrew, "only by pride cometh contention." (Protestants) --- "Pride is the mother of all sects." (St. Augustine)


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Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Proverbs 13:10". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/proverbs-13.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

by pride cometh contention = by pride only cometh, &c. Illustrations: Korah (Num 16); men of Ephraim (Judges 12:1-6); Rehoboam (1Ki 12); the Apostles (Luke 22:24).

well advised: or modest.


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Proverbs 13:10". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/proverbs-13.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Only by pride cometh contention: but with the well advised is wisdom.

Only by pride cometh contention. The "only" is joined by Maurer, Castalio, etc., not to "pride," which immediately follows, but to "cometh contention" - literally, will one give contention. Pride only causeth contention. There only cometh contention by pride. Pride conduces to nothing else than to stir up the proud to contention. It aggravates the sin of contentions so caused, that they arise, not from sudden anger or provocation, but from mere pride. The proud have not the "wisdom" to take 'advice' from others (the parallel clause supplies these words and ideas); so, in conversation with others, they "contend" with all who do not yield to them. The English version, however, joining "only" with the Hebrew word next in order, gives the more likely connection. If it were not for pride there would be no contention, but pride prevents either party confessing himself to be in the wrong; so the strife is begun and continued.

But with the well advised is wisdom. In Proverbs 11:2 it is "with the lowly is wisdom." The "well advised" are those who through lowliness are not too proud to take advice, or to yield to the superior opinion of another. As the "well advised" are opposed to "pride" - i:e., the proud-so "wisdom" is opposed to "contention." For "the wisdom that is from above" is not only "pure," but also "peaceable, gently, and easy to be entreated" (James 3:17). "Wisdom" is the cause of "lowliness."


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Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Proverbs 13:10". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/proverbs-13.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(10) Only by pride cometh contention.—Rather, by pride cometh nothing but contention. A man who is too proud to receive counsel is sure to fall out with others; they are wise who suffer themselves to be advised.


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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Proverbs 13:10". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/proverbs-13.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Only by pride cometh contention: but with the well advised is wisdom.
Only
21:24; Judges 12:1-6; 1 Kings 12:10,11,16; 2 Kings 14:10; Luke 22:24; 1 Timothy 6:4; James 3:14-16; 4:1,5,6; 3 John 1:9,10
with
12:15,16; 17:14; 19:20; 20:18; 25:8; Judges 8:1-3; Luke 14:28-32; Acts 6:1-5

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Proverbs 13:10". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/proverbs-13.html.

Preacher's Complete Homiletical Commentary

CRITICAL NOTES.—

Pro . This may be read "Only by pride cometh contention," or "by pride cometh only (nothing but) contention."

MAIN HOMILETICS OF Pro

THE PARENT OF STRIFE

I. Unlawful contention is the offspring of pride. If she is not her only child, she is her eldest-born. Scripture language more than hints that pride was the beginning of contention among the angels. Paul, speaking of the qualifications of a "bishop" or teacher, tells Timothy that such an one is in danger of "being lifted up with pride," and thus falling "into the condemnation of the devil" (1Ti ), thus seeming to indicate that pride was at the bottom of all the contention that is at present going on in the universe between light and darkness, between good and evil. From the pride of this fallen star has come contention in heaven, and earth, and hell.

He it was whose guile,

Stirred up with envy and revenge, deceived

The mother of mankind; what time his pride

Had cast him out from heaven, with all his host

Of rebel angels, by whose aid aspiring

To set himself in glory 'bove his peers,

He trusted to have equalled the Most High,

If he opposed, and with ambitious aim,

Against the throne and monarchy of God,

Raised impious war in heaven, and battle proud,

With vain attempt.

And in the history of man's dealings with man pride is the root of contention. "Whence come wars and fightings among you?" come they not hence, even of your lusts that war in your members?" (Jas ). And is not the lust of pride, or envy, which is her foster-sister, the great cause of all domestic, and social, and national contentions? Has it not been the cause of every unrighteous war from the days of Chedorlaomer to the present century? And pride breeds contention on a narrower battle-ground still. It often creates war in the human spirit. Pride brings contention between duty and inclination, and, although there is no bloodshed, the contest is often very sharp and painful. The fact that "by pride cometh contention" is so plain that it may be said to be written upon the scroll of time, like Ezekiel's roll, within and without. It is impossible that it should be otherwise. Pride is a thinking more of ourselves than we are—an over-estimation of our own worth. This must lead us to strive for supremacy over others who are our equals, or even our superiors. This must bring contention, for they will not willingly accord to us that to which we have no lawful claim. Therefore, while there is pride in the universe contention will never end. The fountain must be dried up before the streams cease to flow. When a human soul is emptied of pride there will be peace within. In proportion as it ceases to be a ruling force in the world contention will cease. Pride keeps the fallen principalities in contention with heaven, keeps the sinner in contention with his Saviour, and keeps man in contention with man.

II. Thoso who are not ruled by pride are well advised.

1. Because of the consequences that obedience to the dictates of pride must bring to men themselves. There is in all men a wholesome fear of the consequences which flow from certain actions. If a child sees another burnt from playing with the fire, he will avoid doing that which he has seen to bring such pain and deformation to his brother. Self-love deters him from the act. Those who are well advised, because advised by the highest wisdom, know what the consequences of pride have been, and take cognisance of the deformation of character which it works in men around them. Therefore, the natural and spiritual instinct of wholesome self-love leads them to dread that which would bring such an additional scar to their already too much deformed character. The children of wisdom are well advised to be afraid of pride on account of its consequences to themselves.

2. Because of the misery it would bring to those nearly related to them. Isolation is not possible in this world. Every man, woman, and child is more or less nearly related to some others. The relation may be physical, intellectual, political, or moral—in some instances all are combined. A proud man, or woman, or child, makes those who belong to them miserable. A proud father makes his children miserable, a proud king involves his country in war, and brings misery upon his subjects. How many friends has pride severed. How many homes and countries has family or national pride blighted. Surely, then, those are well advised who shun it for the sake of those related to them.

3. Because of its consequences to humanity, The miseries of the human race are increased by pride, and the progress of the gospel is hindered by it. The man who does not scruple to pour oil upon a burning house, not only shows that he has no intention to help to extinguish the flames, but that he intends to widen their influence. Each drop that he pours upon the fire increases its intensity, and spreads the destruction. There are men who do not hesitate, by the indulgence of pride, to increase that war of passions which burns so fiercely and destructively in the world and desolates ten thousand hearts and homes. But the well advised, by the exercise of the grace of humility, endeavour to quench the conflagration which, first kindled by hell, has devastated the earth for so many generations.

OUTLINES AND SUGGESTIVE COMMENTS

Pride, if there be no cause of contention given, will make it. Transcendo non obedio perturbo is the motto written upon pride's triple crown.… Pride is a dividing distemper. Bladders blown up with wind spurt one from another, and will not close; but prick them, and you may pack a thousand of them in a little room.… It was a great trouble to Haman to lead Mordecai's horse, which another man would not have thought so. The moving of a straw troubleth proud flesh; whereas, humility, if compelled to go one mile, will go two for a need; yea, as far as the shoes of the gospel of peace can carry it. "The wisdom from above is peaceable."—Trapp.

As to the great quarrel with God, which needs the ransom (Pro ), and which is mended by the righteousness (Pro 13:6), how long would that last, if we abandoned pride?—Miller.


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Bibliography
Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on Proverbs 13:10". Preacher's Complete Homiletical Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/phc/proverbs-13.html. Funk & Wagnalls Company, 1892.

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