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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Proverbs 13:13

 

 

The one who despises the word will be in debt to it, But the one who fears the commandment will be rewarded.

Adam Clarke Commentary

Whoso despiseth the word - The revelation which God has in his mercy given to man - shall be destroyed; for there is no other way of salvation but that which it points out.

But he that feareth the commandment - That respects it so as to obey it, walking as this revelation directs - shall be rewarded; shall find it to be his highest interest, and shall be in peace or safety, as the Hebrew word ישלם may be translated.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Proverbs 13:13". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/proverbs-13.html. 1832.

The Biblical Illustrator

Proverbs 13:13

Whoso despiseth the Word shall be destroyed.

Man’s destruction

The more literal rendering would be, “He that despiseth the Word shall bring ruin on himself.” This is a great law of the Biblical revelation--namely, that destruction is not a merely arbitrary act on the part of God, a mere penalty, but that it involves the idea of suicide or self-ruin. The law of reward and also the law of punishment are to be found within ourselves. (J. Parker, D.D.)


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Bibliography
Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "Proverbs 13:13". The Biblical Illustrator. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/proverbs-13.html. 1905-1909. New York.

Coffman's Commentaries on the Bible

"Whoso despiseth the word bringeth destruction upon himself," But he that feareth the commandment shall be rewarded."

As Keil pointed out, the setting of this verse in between the tree of life and the fountain of life in Proverbs 13:12 and Proverbs 13:14 makes it imperative to understand "The Word," here as, "The expression of the divine will, the word of God."[22]


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James Burton Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.

Bibliography
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Proverbs 13:13". "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/proverbs-13.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Whoso despiseth the word shall be destroyed,.... The word of God. Either Christ, the essential Word; which must be a great evil, considering the dignity of his person; great ingratitude, considering the grace of his office; very dangerous, considering what a quick, sharp, and powerful Word he is: and such may be said to despise him who despise his ministers, and the Gospel preached by them; and which may be meant by the word, that being the word of God and of truth, the word of righteousness, peace, life, and salvation; and is to them that perish foolishness; and to whom it is so, they shall perish, and be punished with everlasting destruction, for their contempt of it, and disobedience to it. Or the written word may be meant, the Scriptures, which are given by inspiration of God, and therefore ought to be had in the greatest reverence; and yet are greatly slighted and despised by the man of sin and his followers; who set up and prefer their unwritten traditions to them, and so make them of none effect: such are all false teachers, that despise or abuse them, they bring destruction to themselves; for so the words may be rendered, "shall bring destruction to himself", or shall receive detriment from it: so the Targum, from the word itself; the Syriac version, "by it"; and the Arabic version, "by the commandment itself"; by the threatenings in it, and according to them: or, "because of it"; because of the contempt of it;

but he that feareth the commandment; receives the word with reverence, trembles at it; fears God, and keeps his commandments, and fears to break them: he

shall be rewarded; with good, as the Targum adds; for in keeping the commandments of God there is great reward: or, "shall enjoy peace", or "be in safety"F11ישלם "in pace versabitur", V. L. "fruetur pace", Vatablus; "donatur pace", Junius & Tremellius; "pacabitur", Cocceius; "salvabitur", Syriac version. ; for great peace have they which love the law of God, and serve it: or, "shall be sound, and in health"F12 υγιαινει, Sept. ; when those that despise it "shall be corrupted"F13יחבל "corrumpetur"; Pagninus, Montanus, Junius & Tremellius. ; as the word in the preceding clause may be rendered.


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Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Proverbs 13:13". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/proverbs-13.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

Whoever despiseth g the word shall be destroyed: but he that feareth the commandment shall be rewarded.

(g) Meaning the word of God, by which he is admonished of his duty.

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Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Proverbs 13:13". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/proverbs-13.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

the word — that is, of advice, or, instruction (compare Proverbs 10:27; Proverbs 11:31).


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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Proverbs 13:13". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/proverbs-13.html. 1871-8.

Keil & Delitzsch Commentary on the Old Testament

13 Whoever despiseth the word is in bonds to it,

And he that feareth the commandment is rewarded.

The word is thought of as ordering, and thus in the sense of the commandment, e.g. , 1 Samuel 17:19; Daniel 9:23, Daniel 9:25. That which is here said is always true where the will of a man has subordinated itself to the authoritative will of a superior, but principally the proverb has in view the word of God, the מצוה κατ ̓ ἐξ . as the expression of the divine will, which (Proverbs 6:3) appears as the secondary, with the תורה , the general record of the divine will. Regarding בּוּז ל of contemptuous, despiteful opposition, vid ., at Proverbs 6:30, cf. Proverbs 11:12. Joël records the prevailing tradition, for he translates: “Whoever despises advice rushes into destruction; whoever holds the commandment in honour is perfect.” But that ישׁלּם is to be understood neither of perfection nor of peace (lxx and Jerome), but means compensabitur (here not in the sense of punishment, but of reward), we know from Proverbs 11:31. The translation also of יחבל לו by “he rushes into destruction” (lxx καταφθαρήσεται , which the Syr.-Hexap. repeats; Luther, “he destroys himself;” the Venet . οἰχησεταί οἱ , periet sibi ) fails, for one does not see what should have determined the poet to choose just this word, and, instead of the ambiguous dat. ethicus , not rather to say יחבּל נפשׁו . So also this יחבל is not with Gesenius to be connected with חבל = Arab. khabl , corrumpere , but with חבל = Arab. ḥabl , ligare, obligare . Whoever places himself contemptuously against a word which binds him to obedience will nevertheless not be free from that word, but is under pledge until he redeem the pledge by the performance of the obedience refused, or till that higher will enforce payment of the debt withheld by visiting with punishment. Jerome came near the right interpretation: ipse se in futurum obligat ; Abulwalîd refers to Exodus 22:25; and Parchon, Rashi, and others paraphrase: משׁכּן יתמשׁכּן עליו , he is confiscated as by mortgage. Schultens has, with the correct reference of the לו not to the contemner, but to the word, well established and illustrated this explanation: he is pledged by the word, Arab. marhwan ( rahyn ), viz., pigneratus paenae (Livius, xxix. 36). Ewald translates correctly: he is pledged to it; and Hitzig gives the right explanation: “A חבלה [a pledge, cf. Proverbs 20:16] is handed over to the offended law with the חבוּלה [the bad conduct] by the despiser himself, which lapses when he has exhausted the forbearance, so that the punishment is inflicted.” The lxx has another proverb following Proverbs 13:13 regarding υἱὸς δόλιος and οἰκέτης σοφός ; the Syr. has adopted it; Jerome has here the proverb of the animae dolosae ( vid ., at Proverbs 13:9).


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Bibliography
Keil, Carl Friedrich & Delitzsch, Franz. "Commentary on Proverbs 13:13". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/kdo/proverbs-13.html. 1854-1889.

Matthew Henry's Complete Commentary on the Bible

Here is, 1. The character of one that is marked for ruin: He that despises the word of God, and has no regard to it, no veneration for it, nor will be ruled by it, certainly he shall be destroyed, for he slights that which is the only means of curing a destructive disease and makes himself obnoxious to that divine wrath which will certainly be his destruction. Those that prefer the rules of carnal policy before divine precepts, and the allurements of the world and the flesh before God's promises and comforts, despise his word, giving the preference to those things that stand in competition with it; and it is to their own just destruction: they would not take warning. 2. The character of one that is sure to be happy: He that fears the commandment, that stands in awe of God, pays a deference to his authority, has a reverence for his word, is afraid of displeasing God and incurring the penalties annexed to the commandment, shall not only escape destruction, but shall be rewarded for his godly fear. In keeping the commandment there is great reward.


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Bibliography
Henry, Matthew. "Complete Commentary on Proverbs 13:13". "Matthew Henry Complete Commentary on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mhm/proverbs-13.html. 1706.

Matthew Henry's Concise Commentary on the Bible

He that stands in awe of God, and reverences his word, shall escape destruction, and be rewarded for his godly fear.


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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Henry, Matthew. "Concise Commentary on Proverbs 13:13". "Matthew Henry Concise Commentary

on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mhn/proverbs-13.html. 1706.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Whoso despiseth the word shall be destroyed: but he that feareth the commandment shall be rewarded.

The word — The word of God.


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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Proverbs 13:13". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/proverbs-13.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Proverbs 13:13 Whoso despiseth the word shall be destroyed: but he that feareth the commandment shall be rewarded.

Ver. 13. Whoso despiseth the word shall be destroyed.] Bishop Banner’s chaplain called the Bible, in scorn, his little pretty God’s book. Gifford and Rainold said it contained doctrinam peregrinam , strange doctrine - yea, some things profane and apocryphal. The more modest Papists account traditions the touchstone of doctrine and foundation of faith; and repute the Scriptures to be rather a kind of storehouse for advice in matters of religion. (a) We account them the divine beam and most exact balance, cor et animam Dei, the heart and soul of God, as Gregory calleth them; the best fortress against errors, as Augustine, though some of our sublimated sectaries blaspheme that blessed book as a dead letter and a beggarly element.

But he that feareth the commandment.] That honoureth the Scriptures, and trembleth at the word preached, as King Edward VI did, that second Josiah, and as Queen Elizabeth, his sweet sister Temperance, as he used to call her, who, when the Bible was presented to her as she rode triumphantly through London after her coronation, received the same with both her hands, and kissing it, laid it to her breast, saying that it had ever been her delight, and should be her rule of government.


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Proverbs 13:13". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/proverbs-13.html. 1865-1868.

The Popular Commentary by Paul E. Kretzmann

v. 13. Whoso despiseth the Word shall be destroyed, even if a person thinks he can mock the will and Word of the Lord, he is still bonded to it and cannot escape the obligation laid on him; but he that feareth the commandment shall be rewarded, he will enjoy blessing and peace.


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Bibliography
Kretzmann, Paul E. Ph. D., D. D. "Commentary on Proverbs 13:13". "Kretzmann's Popular Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/kpc/proverbs-13.html. 1921-23.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Despiseth; disobeyeth it wilfully and presumptuously. The word; the word of God, which is called the word by way of eminency, Deuteronomy 30:14, compared with Romans 10:18 1 Thessalonians 5:17, and elsewhere.

Shall be destroyed, except he repent, and return to his obedience.

That feareth the commandment; that hath a reverence to its authority, and is afraid to violate it.


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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Proverbs 13:13". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/proverbs-13.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

13. Despiseth the word (of God, or of Wisdom) shall be destroyed — Bring destruction to himself; the idea is, that the despiser, or neglecter, or violator of the word, is in legal bondage to it, and is liable to suffer the penalty.

But he that feareth (reverences, obeys) the commandment of God shall be rewarded, recompensed, or be at peace, or safe. So the Septuagint and Vulgate, but the Authorized Version follows the Hebrew. Compare Proverbs 11:31; Jeremiah 18:20.


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Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Proverbs 13:13". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/proverbs-13.html. 1874-1909.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Come. To defend what he has asserted, or to pass for a liar. Hebrew, "shall be destroyed by it." (Mont.[Montanus?]) (Haydock) --- Those who despise God's order shall perish. --- Deceitful, &c. This is not in Hebrew, nor in some of the Latin editions. (Calmet) --- Septuagint, "to the deceitful son nothing shall be good. But the ways of the wise servant shall prosper, and his paths shall be made straight," chap. xiv. 15. (Haydock)


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Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Proverbs 13:13". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/proverbs-13.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

the word. Hebrew. dabar (no Art.) App-73.

shall be destroyed. Illustrations: the world (Gen 6; 1 Peter 3:20. 2 Peter 2:6); Israel (Deuteronomy 28:15-68); the lord (2 Kings 7:2, 2 Kings 7:17-20); Joash (2 Chronicles 24:17-25); Amaziah (2 Chronicles 25:16-27. 2 Chronicles 15:32); the priests and others (2 Chronicles 36:16); Jehoiakim (Jeremiah 26:20-24); the Jews (Jeremiah 44:17, Jeremiah 44:27).

shall be rewarded. Illustrations: Pharaoh"s servants (Exodus 9:20, Exodus 9:25); Amaziah (2 Chronicles 25:6-11); Ebed-melech (Jeremiah 39:15-18). Contrast Josiah (2 Chronicles 34:27, 2 Chronicles 34:30) with Jehoiakim his son (Jeremiah 36:23-30; Jeremiah 22:18, Jeremiah 22:19).


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Proverbs 13:13". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/proverbs-13.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Whoso despiseth the word shall be destroyed: but he that feareth the commandment shall be rewarded.

Whose despiseth the word (namely, of God) shall be destroyed: but he that feareth the commandment shall be rewarded - Hebrew, 'shall be destroyed for himself' [ low (H3807a)]: all he shall get for himself is destruction. Or else, he shall be destroyed for it - i:e., for despising it. The Chaldaic, Syriac, and Arabic, translate, 'by it.' Maurer translates, 'becometh liable to it'-namely, to the punishment which is inflicted on its violators. So Esau "despised (his) birthright," and became liable to punishment accordingly (Genesis 25:34). So the despisers of the Lord's invitation (Luke 14:18). Also the Jews who "despised God's words, so that the wrath of the Lord arose, against His people, until (there was) no remedy" (2 Chronicles 36:16). "Shall be rewarded" ( y


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Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Proverbs 13:13". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/proverbs-13.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(13) Shall be destroyed.—Literally, brings ruin on himself. Or the sense may be, “is (still) bound to it,” even although he may contemptuously neglect it. Comp. the advice (Matthew 5:25), to “agree with our adversary quickly,” that is, satisfy the requirements of the law of God while there is time, lest it appear as our adversary at the day of judgment.


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Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Proverbs 13:13". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/proverbs-13.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Whoso despiseth the word shall be destroyed: but he that feareth the commandment shall be rewarded.
despiseth
1:25,30,31; 2 Samuel 12:9,10; 2 Chronicles 36:16; Jeremiah 43:2; 44:16,17; Ezekiel 20:13,16,24; Luke 16:31; Hebrews 10:28,29
he
Ezra 10:3; Psalms 115:13; Isaiah 66:2; Malachi 3:16
rewarded
Heb. in peace.
Psalms 19:11; 119:165; Matthew 5:12; 2 John 1:8

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Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Proverbs 13:13". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/proverbs-13.html.

Preacher's Complete Homiletical Commentary

CRITICAL NOTES.—

Pro . Shall be destroyed, rather "is bound," or "is in bonds to it." Rewarded, "be at peace."

MAIN HOMILETICS OF Pro

BOUND BY LAW

The literal translation of the first clause of this verse is "Whoso despiseth the law is bound by it," or "is in bonds to it" (see Critical Notes).

I. Divine law is a necessity of human nature. There must be a standard of right and wrong for moral and responsible creatures, and the law which is that standard ought to be appreciated in proportion to its perfection. Law in a family is a necessity for its right regulation, and in proportion as it approaches perfection it will meet the needs of its members.

1. The law of God is a necessity, in order to educate men's moral sense. The human conscience sometimes lies buried under ignorance, or is passive in the hands of lawless desire, and it needs the law to arouse it to perform its proper functions, and thus prepare men for a Saviour. "Christ," says Paul, "is the end of the law." It arouses men to feel their need of His atonement.

2. It is needed as a basis of punishment and reward. There are some actions upon which men, by almost universal consent, pass judgment, and their judgment is embodied in their law, and thus forms a basis of conviction for the transgressor. And there are other actions which, by the same consent, are allowed to deserve reward, and that universal consent forms a kind of law. So the holy, just, and true law of God is needed as a standard by which men's actions may be judged.

II. Whether men honour or despise the law they are bound by it. There is no place and there are no circumstances in this world in which men are not bound by physical law. Every man finds that if he would have health he must inhale pure air. No man can afford to despise this law, but whether he do so or not, it will hold him in bonds. He must obey it if he would have health, to disobey may be death. If a moving object is coming to meet us, if it has more force in it than we have, we shall be overthrown by it if we do not get out of its path. We may do as we please about meeting it, but we cannot be loosed from the law which governs it. These laws of our earthly life may not be universal laws, they are doubtless many of them confined to our present state of being, but the moral law of God is in force throughout the universe and there is no escape from it. What is good here is good everywhere, what is morally right now can never be wrong through all eternity. Whether men obey it or defy it, they will be for ever bound by it.

III. It is seen to be a good law by the results of keeping it. "He that feareth the commandment shall be rewarded," or "shall be at peace." Even when men violate physical law they do not pronounce it bad. But it is seen to be good by its effects on those who keep it. Men who obey the laws of health recommend those laws in their own persons. Those who acknowledge the binding nature of Divine law and fear it, recommend it to others as good. "Great peace have they that love Thy law and nothing shall offend them" (Psa ). Self-love binds men to obey it. "Whoso breaketh" this "hedge, a serpent shall bite him" (Ecc 10:8). The whole Bible is an exposition of this text. (See Homiletics on Pro 13:6).

OUTLINES AND SUGGESTIVE COMMENTS

The slave fears the penalty; the child the commandment.—Bridges.

In many things we offend all, but we are not all despisers of the Word of God. Good men have reason to lament their manifold breaches of the commandment, and yet they have a sincere love and esteem for it.—Lawson.

Whatever comes with Divine authority is a Divine commandment. The Gospel is on this as well as other accounts called the "law of faith," being the Divine prescription for the salvation of sinners.—Wardlaw.

This word has a private and personal, as well as a public application; but it is in the providential government of the nations that its truth has been most conspicuously displayed. The kingdoms of this world in these days prosper or pine in proportion as they honour or despise God's Word.… Number the nations over one by one, and see where property is valuable and life secure; mark the places where you would like to invest your means and educate your family; you will shun some of the sunniest climes of earth, as if they lay under a polar night, because the light of truth has been taken from their sky. Traverse the world in search of merely human good, seeking but an earthly home, and your tent, like Abraham's, will certainly be pitched at "the place of the altar."—Arnot.

The more we despise the law, the more we are bound by it. "But he that fears." This is a splendid picture of the Christian. He is not one that keeps the law, but "fears" it, i.e., tries to keep it, fears it with a godly fear, and as a climax, frequent in a second clause (see chap. Pro and passim), he is not one who comes simply less under bonds, but is forgiven altogether.—Miller.

The word of Divine revelation is here, as it were, personified as a real superhuman power, whose service one cannot escape, and in default of this he comes into bondage to it, i.e., loses his liberty.—Lange's Commentary.


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Bibliography
Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on Proverbs 13:13". Preacher's Complete Homiletical Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/phc/proverbs-13.html. Funk & Wagnalls Company, 1892.

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