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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Proverbs 13:18

 

 

Poverty and shame will come to him who neglects discipline, But he who regards reproof will be honored.

The Biblical Illustrator

Proverbs 13:18

But he that regardeth reproof shall be honoured.

Accepting reproof

One of the weakest traits of any person is to be unwilling to accept honest criticism and correction. From the foolish child who will never listen to parental authority, on to the foolish man who will never listen to rebuke or reason, pride always goeth before a fall. Honest criticism is often a bitter dose to swallow, but most tonics are bitter, and we are the stronger for taking them down bravely. “If I am censured,” said that godly man, Bishop Griswold, “then let me correct, but never justify, my faults.” A minister with more zeal than discretion once called on the bishop and belaboured him with rather a harsh denunciation. Instead of showing the man out of the door, the bishop calmly replied, “My dear friend, I do not wonder that they who witness the inconsistencies in my daily conduct should think that I have no religion. I often fear this myself, and I feel very grateful to you for giving me this warning.” This reply was made in such unaffected meekness and sincerity that the visitor at once begged the bishop’s pardon, and always regarded him afterwards as one of the most Christlike Christians he had ever known. He is doubly the fool who not only flings himself into a pit, but resents the friendly hand that tries to help him out of it. (T. G. Cuyler.)


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Bibliography
Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "Proverbs 13:18". The Biblical Illustrator. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/proverbs-13.html. 1905-1909. New York.

Coffman's Commentaries on the Bible

"Poverty and shame shall be to him that refuseth correction; But he that regardeth reproof shall be honored."

A various reading of the first clause is: "Poverty and shame shall be to him that throweth correction to the wind."[27] "A man who follows vicious courses and cannot be persuaded to abandon them must be left to the ruin and disgrace that shall soon come upon him. Then, when through bitter experience, he learns the truth of what he would not believe, the correction he had rejected will be like a poisoned dart in his soul, inflaming his conscience with tormenting remorse."[28]


Copyright Statement
James Burton Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.

Bibliography
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Proverbs 13:18". "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/proverbs-13.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Poverty and shame shall be to him that refuseth instruction,.... Of parents, masters, and ministers of the word; the instruction of wisdom, the instruction of the Gospel, in things relating to their present spiritual peace, and to their eternal welfare: such generally come to poverty and disgrace in this life, and to everlasting shame and contempt in another; see Proverbs 5:11;

but he that regardeth reproof; the reproof of the word, and of the ministers of it, and of all good men, and takes it kindly, and acts according to it,

shall be honoured; with riches and reputation; if not with the riches of this world, yet with the riches of grace and glory; and shall have honour among the saints, and from the Lord himself; who will honour those that honour him, as they do who regard the reproof and instruction of his word, 1 Samuel 2:30.


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Proverbs 13:18". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/proverbs-13.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

(Compare Proverbs 10:17; Proverbs 12:1).


Copyright Statement
These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Proverbs 13:18". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/proverbs-13.html. 1871-8.

Keil & Delitzsch Commentary on the Old Testament

18 Poverty and shame (to him) who rejecteth correction;

But he who regardeth reproof is honoured.

We are neither to supply אישׁ before רישׁ קלונו (or more correctly, abstr. pro concr ., as רמיּה , Proverbs 1:27), nor ל before פורע , as Gesenius ( Lehrgeb . §227a) does; nor has the part . פּורע the value of a hypothetical clause like Proverbs 18:13, Job 41:18, although it may certainly be changed into such without destroying the meaning (Ewald, Hitzig); but “poverty and shame is he who is without correction,” is equivalent to, poverty and shame is the conclusion or lot of him who is without correction; it is left to the hearer to find out the reference of the predicate to the subject in the sense of the quality, the consequence, or the lot (cf. e.g. , Proverbs 10:17; Proverbs 13:1; Proverbs 14:35).

(Note: Vid ., regarding the strong demand which the Hebr. style makes on hearer and reader, my Gesch. der jüdischen Poesie (1863), p. 189.)

Regarding פרע , vid ., p. 73. The Latin expression corresponding is: qui detrectat disciplinam . He who rejects the admonition and correction of his parents, his pastor, or his friend, and refuses every counsel to duty as a burdensome moralizing, such an one must at last gather wisdom by means of injury if he is at all wise: he grows poorer in consequence of missing the right rule of life, and has in addition thereto to be subject to disgrace through his own fault. On the contrary, to him who has the disgrace to deserve reproof, but who willingly receives it, and gives it effect, the disgrace becomes an honour, for not to reject reproof shows self-knowledge, humility, and good-will; and these properties in the judgment of others bring men to honour, and have the effect of raising them in their position in life and in their calling.


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The Keil & Delitzsch Commentary on the Old Testament is a derivative of a public domain electronic edition.

Bibliography
Keil, Carl Friedrich & Delitzsch, Franz. "Commentary on Proverbs 13:18". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/kdo/proverbs-13.html. 1854-1889.

Matthew Henry's Complete Commentary on the Bible

Note, 1. He that is so proud that he scorns to be taught will certainly be abased. he that refuses the good instruction offered him, as if it were a reflection upon his honour and an abridgment of his liberty, poverty and shame shall be to him: he will become a beggar and live and die in disgrace; every one will despise him as foolish, and stubborn, and ungovernable. 2. He that is so humble that he takes it well to be told of his faults shall certainly be exalted: He that regards a reproof, whoever gives it to him, and will mend what is amiss when it is shown him, gains respect as wise and candid; he avoids that which would be a disgrace to him and is in a fair way to make himself considerable.


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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Henry, Matthew. "Complete Commentary on Proverbs 13:18". "Matthew Henry Complete Commentary on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mhm/proverbs-13.html. 1706.

Matthew Henry's Concise Commentary on the Bible

He that scorns to be taught, will certainly be brought down.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Henry, Matthew. "Concise Commentary on Proverbs 13:18". "Matthew Henry Concise Commentary

on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mhn/proverbs-13.html. 1706.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Proverbs 13:18 Poverty and shame [shall be to] him that refuseth instruction: but he that regardeth reproof shall be honoured.

Ver. 18. Poverty and shame.] These two are fitly set together; for poverty is usually slighted, if not shamed. [James 2:16]

Nil habet infelix paupertas durius in se

Quam quod ridicules homines facit. ”

The world looks over a poor though virtuous man. "This thy son"; {Luke 15:30} not, This my brother. And why, but because in poverty? How much more an uncounsellable and incorrigible man, as here, and as that prodigal had been till he came to himself!

But he that regardeth reproof shall be honoured.] Though not haply enriched, he shall be of good account with the wise and godly, though in meaner condition. Mr Fox being asked whether he knew such an honest poor man who had received help and good counsel from him in time of trouble, answered, ‘I remember him well; I tell you, I forget lords and ladies to remember such.’


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Proverbs 13:18". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/proverbs-13.html. 1865-1868.

The Popular Commentary by Paul E. Kretzmann

v. 18. Poverty and shame shall be to him that refuseth instruction, declining to accept correction and moral training; but he that regarded reproof, observing it carefully, accepting it willingly, shall be honored.


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Bibliography
Kretzmann, Paul E. Ph. D., D. D. "Commentary on Proverbs 13:18". "Kretzmann's Popular Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/kpc/proverbs-13.html. 1921-23.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Instruction; whereby he might have been kept from destructive and dishonourable courses.

He that regardeth reproof, that considers it seriously, receiveth it kindly, and reformeth himself by it, shall be honoured, and enriched, which is implied from the former branch. Not that it is so always, but commonly, and when God sees it good for a man. Or if he do not always gain riches, he shall certainly have honour both from God and men.


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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Proverbs 13:18". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/proverbs-13.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

18. Refuseth instruction — “Poverty and shame” shall be the condition of such as thus act.


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Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Proverbs 13:18". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/proverbs-13.html. 1874-1909.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

Proverbs 13:18. Poverty, &c., shall be to him, that refuseth instruction — Whereby he might have been preserved from destructive and dishonourable courses; but he that regardeth reproof — That considers it seriously, receives it kindly, and reforms himself by it; shall be honoured — And enriched, which is to be inferred from the former branch. Not indeed that it is always the case, but commonly, and when God sees it will be good for a man. Or, if he do not gain riches, he shall certainly have honour both from God and good men.


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Bibliography
Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on Proverbs 13:18". Joseph Benson's Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/proverbs-13.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

To him. Hebrew, "destroy discipline," so that the most wretched are often noted for immorality. Septuagint, "instruction takes away poverty," as "the whole earth supports the man that has a trade," Greek: technion, according to the Greek proverb. (Calmet)


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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Proverbs 13:18". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/proverbs-13.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

Poverty. See note on "poor", Proverbs 13:7.


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Proverbs 13:18". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/proverbs-13.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Poverty and shame shall be to him that refuseth instruction: but he that regardeth reproof shall be honoured.

Poverty and shame (shall be) to him that refuseth instruction - disciplinary instruction, correction. 'Disciplinary instruction' is needed for learning any honest trade or profession. He who refuseth discipline excludes himself from a way of livelihood, and involves himself in "poverty."

But he that regardeth reproof shall be honoured - before God, and often before men. "Regardeth," mindfully and practically; not merely bearing it calmly, but profiting by it, and refraining from the sins which were the cause of it. "Honoured," stands in contrast to "shame" and to "poverty," which is generally regarded with contempt. The pious are not always enriched, but they are sure, either here or hereafter, to "be honoured."


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Proverbs 13:18". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/proverbs-13.html. 1871-8.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Poverty and shame shall be to him that refuseth instruction: but he that regardeth reproof shall be honoured.
Poverty
13; 5:9-14; 12:1; 15:5,31,32; 19:6; Jeremiah 5:3-9; Hebrews 12:25
he
9:9; 25:12; Psalms 141:5

Copyright Statement
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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Proverbs 13:18". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/proverbs-13.html.

Preacher's Complete Homiletical Commentary

MAIN HOMILETICS OF Pro

THE WAY TO HONOUR

I. Man needs instruction because his natural intuitions are not enough to meet the needs of human life. The instinct of the animal is enough to enable it to fulfil its destiny. Its limited powers find sufficient guidance in the use of the faculties which are born with it. But it is not so with man. If, as some philosophers suppose, a man comes into the world without any ideas, if he receives everything from the outside world, instruction is so much the more needed, but even if he does bring with him a small stock of knowledge, experience shows us that the amount is very small, and he needs instruction for body, soul, and spirit from the first day of his dawning intellect to the last of his probationary life.

II. Instruction is to be obtained. Somebody will teach him either directly or indirectly. He will learn much from observation and much from direct teaching. The word here, as in chap. Pro , includes the idea of correction. This forms an inevitable part of man's instruction in matters relating both to his bodily and spiritual life. God has provided for man's instruction in relation to his spiritual needs. It is within the reach of all men in a Christian nation (See Isa 55:1-3).

III. If he refuses what he needs, he will have what he does not desire. He will have poverty. This is a calamity when self-inflicted. Whatever is the outcome of sin must be a calamity. If a man refuses to submit to the correction and instruction of others in connection with matters relative to every-day life, he shuts himself up to his own ignorance and shuts out all possibility of advancing in any profession or calling. Therefore he must be poor in worldly wealth. And it is pre-eminently true of him who refuses the disciplinary instruction of God. Such a man must be poor in a spiritual sense throughout eternity. And this will bring shame. Shame is always the result of sin. There is no shame in being poor in material things when poverty is the outcome of righteousness, but there is shame in poverty which is the result of neglected opportunities. What is the root of this rejection of instruction? Is it not pride? (See Homiletics on chap. Pro , page 193; also on chap. Pro 12:1, page 246.)

IV. Reproof is instruction. This is implied here, and in many other passages in this book where the words are used interchangeably. A man who reproves us gives us information about ourselves. He lets us know how we appear in the eyes of others. This ought to be valued by us. We are too partial to see our own defects, therefore we ought to be glad when they are pointed out to us by another.

V. Taking reproof in a spirit of humility is the only road to honour. In the long run, men will give honour where honour is due. They will give their esteem, and respect, and confidence to men who, from moral or intellectual eminence, deserve it. And, as we have seen, this height can be reached only by those who are willing to be taught both by God and by man.

OUTLINES AND SUGGESTIVE COMMENTS

Poverty is in itself a want; but no misery unless shame be joined with it. Shame is in itself a misery; but much greater if joined with poverty, which hath no means to shelter or cover it. Now both are to him that refuseth instruction. For, indeed, instruction is a glorious treasure, offered and opened to him who hath need of it; and, therefore, to refuse it, what can it be but poverty and shame? And, though it be the too common fault of those that are great, either in riches or honour, to despise reproof, yet the most honour, the truest riches, are to those that embrace it. St. Bernard, therefore, writing unto a great person, but deserving reproof, saith "Charity hath forced me to reproof thee, which grieveth with thee, although thou be not grieved, and which pitieth thee, although thou pitieth not thyself, and therefore it doth lament the more, because thou dost not lament, who art to be lamented; therefore doth it pity thee the more, because thou dost not pity thyself, who art in so pitiful a condition.—Jermin.


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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on Proverbs 13:18". Preacher's Complete Homiletical Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/phc/proverbs-13.html. Funk & Wagnalls Company, 1892.

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