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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Proverbs 13:22

 

 

A good man leaves an inheritance to his children's children, And the wealth of the sinner is stored up for the righteous.

Adam Clarke Commentary

A good man leaveth an inheritance - He files many a prayer in heaven in their behalf, and his good example and advices are remembered and quoted from generation to generation. Besides, whatever property he left was honestly acquired, and well-gotten goods are permanent. The general experience of men shows this to be a common case; and that property ill-gotten seldom reaches to the third generation. This even the heathens observed. Hence:

De male quaesitis non gaudet tertius haeres.

"The third generation shall not possess the goods that have been unjustly acquired."


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Proverbs 13:22". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/proverbs-13.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

An expression of trust, that in the long run the anomalies of the world are rendered even (compare the marginal references). The heaped up treasures of the wicked find their way at last into the hands of better men.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Proverbs 13:22". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/proverbs-13.html. 1870.

The Biblical Illustrator

Proverbs 13:22

A good man leaveth an inheritance to his children’s children

The inheritance of a good man’s children

The happiness of men depends less on their external conditions than on their personal virtues.
“A good man is satisfied from himself.” The effects of a man’s habits are transmitted to his children, and even to their descendants. They derive from his character a sufficient and a permanent inheritance.

I. The instruction of a good man is an inheritance to his children. The habits which a young man acquires under his father’s eye are the foundations of his character. Even talents are subordinate to virtues, and good affections are of more importance in human life than the most splendid ornaments of an unprincipled mind. He who adds to good paternal character the principles of liberal knowledge and the views of a liberal mind sends his children into the world with those precious endowments without which the wealth of the rich serves only to render them more conspicuously contemptible or unhappy. Men of the same worth are not equally qualified for the duties of parental tuition, and their children have not the same advantages. But there is a minuteness and an affection in the paternal care of a good man which supplies the lack of many talents. His children venerate his intentions, even where his judgment has failed him.

II. The example of a good man is an inheritance to his children. The character of a father lies at the foundation of his influence, and the effect of his paternal solicitude depends on it. His habits are his most successful admonitions, and the examples of religion and probity which his children receive from the general tenor of his temper and conduct are his most permanent instructions. If he has convinced his children that he derives his motives and his consolations from the sincerity of his faith, and that he allows no competition to be in his mind betwixt the praise of men and the approbation of God, his example does more to determine their habits than his best instructions. There are certainly defects in all human characters which render our best examples to our children very imperfect. But even habitual errors in a good man are not vices, and defects and infirmities do not prevent the influence of substantial virtues.

III. The care and protection of providence are an inheritance to a good man’s children. A good man will use his best endeavour to qualify his children for the business and duties of life; but his chief dependence is on Providence. He commits his children to God. His paternal labours are sanctified by prayer. It is an ever-working law that God “shows mercy unto thousands of them that love Him,” and to their children after them. The testimony of ages shows that this law has its full effect, and warrants the confidence with which devout men commit their children to God. The influence of God on the circumstances which regulate our lot is real and perpetual, amidst all the irreligion and incredulity of the world. The plan of Providence is not so uniform as to render it certain that the children of good men will be always prosperous, Their own misconduct often determines their conditions; so may errors in their early education; so may the moral discipline which they require.

IV. The kindness of faithful men is an inheritance to a good man’s children. Their success in life must in part depend on the assistance and the friendship of other men, and the purposes of Providence in their favour are accomplished by means of those whom God raises up to assist, or to guide them. God selects the instruments of His purpose from all the variety of human characters. Kindness done to the child of a good man may become the means of transmitting virtue and prosperity through successive generations. Practical conclusions:

1. The indispensable obligation of every father to give to his children the inheritance of the faithful.

2. The children of good men ought anxiously to preserve the moral and religious advantages which they have received from their fathers.

3. Every conscientious man should feel a personal obligation to help in ensuring to the children of good men the inheritance bequeathed to them by their fathers. (Sir H. M. Wellwood.)

The advantage of having godly parents

What so interesting as children? Children are pledges of mutual and hallowed affection. Love to children is the source of numberless and unutterable hopes and fears, and pains and pleasures. It is the emblem of Divine compassion. “As a father pitieth his children.” If parents are affected by the condition of children, children are affected by the conduct of parents. We constantly see children, in ways innumerable, suffering for the vices of their ancestors. The fact is undeniable; and deism has to encounter the same difficulty with revelation. Religion is no more chargeable with it than the course of nature. On the other hand, goodness operates powerfully and beneficially in descent. In the text we have a godly father entailing blessings on his family.

I. The character in question is a good man. None are good perfectly; none are good naturally; some are saved, and God has begun a good work on them. This is the origin of the character; but what are the features of it?

1. In a good man we must have piety.

2. We must have sincerity.

3. We must have uniformity.

4. We must have benevolence and beneficence.

II. Such a good man may be found in connected life. His religion will improve all those views and feelings that tend to make him social and useful. The Scripture knows nothing of any pre-eminence attaching to celibacy. Though the subject is spoken of in reference to the man, the woman is by no means excluded. To a family, a good mother, no less than a good father, is an invaluable blessing.

III. Examine what the inheritance is which a good man leaves to his offspring.

1. It comprehends religious instructions.

2. Pious example.

3. It takes in believing prayers.

4. It consists of sanctified substance.

5. The death of a good man is another part of this inheritance.

6. God bears a regard to the descendants of His followers. (William Jay.)

The wealth of the sinner is laid up for the just.--

Material wealth

I. As entailed by the good and alienated by the evil. Here we have it--

1. Entailed by the good. “A good man leaveth an inheritance to his children’s children.” It is a characteristic in man that he feels an interest in posterity. This is an indication of the greatness of man’s nature. It is here intimated by Solomon that the good have some special security by which their property shall descend to their children’s children. And truly they have; and what is it? The probable goodness of their children’s children.

2. Alienated by the evil. Wickedness, from its very nature, cannot hold property through many generations: the fortunes it inherits must crumble away.

II. As gained by industry and squandered by imprudence. Every acre of land is full of potential wealth. Skilled industry can make more of one rood of earth than some men can an acre. But it requires even more sense to retain and rightly use property than to get it. (Homilist.)

An inheritance that will wear

When the renowned Admiral Haddock was dying he begged to see his son, to whom he thus delivered himself--“Notwithstanding my rank in life and public services for so many years, I shall leave you only a small fortune; but, my dear boy, it is honestly got, and will wear well; there are no seamen’s wages or provisions in it, nor is there one single penny of dirty money.”


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Bibliography
Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "Proverbs 13:22". The Biblical Illustrator. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/proverbs-13.html. 1905-1909. New York.

Coffman's Commentaries on the Bible

"A good man leaveth an inheritance to his children's children; And the wealth of the sinner is laid up for the righteous."

There is a sense in which this is profoundly true. Christ said, "The meek shall inherit the earth." In the earthly sense, the meek usually get skinned out of their possessions; and yet, in the sense of the true "possession of the earth," it is only the righteous who have it. Of course, we do not think that is what Solomon had in mind here!

Another rendition here comes close to saying what Solomon probably meant: "A good person will have wealth to give to his children and grandchildren, but in the end good people will get all the things that evil people have."[31] Lazarus finally got all the joy that the rich man enjoyed on earth; and it was all taken away from the rich man (Luke 16). This passage falls short of saying that, on earth all the property of evil people will pass into the hands of the righteous. However, we have a feeling that such a view may have been entertained by Solomon and the Israelites in general.


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James Burton Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.

Bibliography
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Proverbs 13:22". "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/proverbs-13.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

A good man leaveth an inheritance to his children's children,.... He not only has a sufficiency for the present support of himself and family; but is so prospered and succeeded, as to leave an inheritance after him; and which is continued to and enjoyed, not only by his immediate offspring, but theirs also; for being got honestly, it wears well; see Proverbs 13:11;

and the wealth of the sinner is laid up for the just; the riches which wicked men get are laid up in the purposes of God for good men; and in his providence they are translated from the one to the other: so the riches of the Egyptians were designed for the Israelites, and by the providence of God were put into their hands; see Job 27:16.


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Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Proverbs 13:22". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/proverbs-13.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

A good [man] leaveth an inheritance to his children's children: and the k wealth of the sinner [is] laid up for the just.

(k) Read (Job 27:16-17).

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Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Proverbs 13:22". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/proverbs-13.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

just — While good men‘s estates remain in their families, God so orders that the gains of sinners inure to the just (compare Proverbs 28:8; Psalm 37:18, Psalm 37:22, Psalm 37:26, etc.).


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This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Proverbs 13:22". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/proverbs-13.html. 1871-8.

Keil & Delitzsch Commentary on the Old Testament

22 The good man leaveth behind him for his children's children,

And the wealth of the sinner is laid up for the just.

As a commencing word, טוב signifies in the Mishle for the most part bonum ( prae ); but here, as at Proverbs 12:2, cf. Proverbs 22:9; Proverbs 14:4, it signifies bonus . As the expression that God is טוב (Psalms 25:8, etc.) of the O.T. is equivalent to the N.T. that He is ἀγάπη , so that man who in his relation to others is determined by unselfish love is טוב for the good man [ der Gütige ], i.e. , the man who is willing to communicate all good is truly good, because the essence of צדקה , righteousness of life, is love. Such an one suffers no loss by his liberality, but, according to the law, Proverbs 11:25, by which a dispenser of blessings is at the same time also a recipient of blessings, he has only gain, so that he makes his children's children to inherit, i.e. , leaves behind him an inheritance extending even to his grandchildren ( vid ., regarding הנחיל , p. 182; here trans. as containing its object in itself, as at Deuteronomy 32:8 : to make to inherit, to place in possession of an inheritance). The sinner, on the contrary ( חוטא sing. to חטּאים , ἁμαρτωλοί ), loses his wealth, it is already destined to pass over to the righteous who is worthy of it, and makes use (cf. Job 27:17) of that which he possesses in accordance with the will and appointment of God - a revelation of justice appertaining to time, the exceptions to which the old limited doctrine of requital takes no notice of. חיל , strength, then like our “ Vermögen ” (cf. opes, facultates ), that by means of which one is placed in circumstances to accomplish much (Fl.); cf. regarding the fundamental idea contorquere, compingere , p. 226, also regarding צפן , properly condensare , then condere , p. 61.


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Bibliography
Keil, Carl Friedrich & Delitzsch, Franz. "Commentary on Proverbs 13:22". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/kdo/proverbs-13.html. 1854-1889.

Matthew Henry's Complete Commentary on the Bible

See here, 1. How a good man's estate lasts: He leaves an inheritance to his children's children. It is part of his praise that he is thoughtful for posterity, that he does not lay all out upon himself, but is in care to do well for those that come after him, not by withholding more than is meet, but by a prudent and decent frugality. He trains up his children to this, that they may leave it to their children; and especially he is careful, both by justice and charity, to obtain the blessing of God upon what he has, and to entail that blessing upon his children, without which the greatest industry and frugality will be in vain: A good man, by being good and doing good, by honouring the Lord with his substance and spending it in his service, secures it to his posterity; or, if he should not leave them much of this world's goods, his prayers, his instructions, his good example, will be the best entail, and the promises of the covenant will be an inheritance to his children's children, Psalm 103:17. 2. How it increases by the accession of the wealth of the sinner to it, for that is laid up for the just. If it be asked, How should good men grow so rich, who are not so eager upon the world as others are and who commonly suffer for their well-doing? It is here answered, God, in his providence, often brings into their hands that which wicked people had laid up for themselves. The innocent shall divide the silver, Job 27:16, Job 27:17. The Israelites shall spoil the Egyptians (Exodus 12:36) and eat the riches of the Gentiles, Isaiah 61:6.


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Bibliography
Henry, Matthew. "Complete Commentary on Proverbs 13:22". "Matthew Henry Complete Commentary on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mhm/proverbs-13.html. 1706.

Matthew Henry's Concise Commentary on the Bible

The servant of God who is not anxious about riches, takes the best method of providing for his children.


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Bibliography
Henry, Matthew. "Concise Commentary on Proverbs 13:22". "Matthew Henry Concise Commentary

on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mhn/proverbs-13.html. 1706.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Proverbs 13:22 A good [man] leaveth an inheritance to his children’s children: and the wealth of the sinner [is] laid up for the just.

Ver. 22. A good man leaveth inheritance to his child.] Personal goodness is profitable to posterity. God gives not to his servants some small annuity for life only, as great men used to do; but "keepeth mercy for thousands" of generations "of them that fear him" [Exodus 34:7] - (where the Masorites observe Nun-Rabbath, a large N, in the word Notsot, "keepeth," to note the large extent of God’s love to the good man’s posterity.) God left David "a lamp in Jerusalem," [1 Kings 15:4] although his house were not so with God. [2 Samuel 23:5]

And the wealth of the sinner is laid up for the just.] As Nabal’s was for David, Haman’s for Mordecai, the Canaanites’ for the Israelites. Howbeit this holds not perpetually and universally in every wicked person; for some of them are "full of children, and leave the rest of their substance for their babes." [Psalms 17:14] Hereupon "their inward thought is, that their houses shall continue for ever; they call their lands after their own names" - as Cain called his new built city after the name of his son Enoch [Genesis 4:17] - "this their way is their folly" - or, is their constant hope, for the word signifies both - "and their posterity approve their sayings," and vote the same way. [Psalms 49:11; Psalms 49:13] But together with their lands, they bequeath their children their sins and punishments, which is far worse than that legacy of leprosy that Joab left his issue. [2 Samuel 3:29] Compare Job 27:16-17, Isaiah 61:5.


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Proverbs 13:22". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/proverbs-13.html. 1865-1868.

The Popular Commentary by Paul E. Kretzmann

v. 22. A good man leaveth an inheritance to his children's children, his estate being transmitted to them complete, as a result of God's blessing upon him; and the wealth of the sinner is laid up for the just, the latter eventually becoming the possessor of that which the sinner squanders.


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Kretzmann, Paul E. Ph. D., D. D. "Commentary on Proverbs 13:22". "Kretzmann's Popular Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/kpc/proverbs-13.html. 1921-23.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Is by God’s powerful providence ofttimes translated to good men of another family, who will be more faithful stewards of it.


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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Proverbs 13:22". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/proverbs-13.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

22. A good man — One who is good and doeth good — a benevolent man.

An inheritance to his children’s children — Namely, in the remembrance of his piety, love, and compassion. A great truth, which should be well pondered by those on whom Providence has liberally bestowed the blessings of this life.


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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Proverbs 13:22". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/proverbs-13.html. 1874-1909.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

Proverbs 13:22. A good man leaveth an inheritance, &c. — “A man that doeth good with his estate, takes the surest course to settle it upon his posterity for many generations;” and the wealth, &c. — Rather, but the wealth of the sinner, “of him who regards nothing but his own sinful lusts and pleasures, shall be transferred from his family into one that is truly virtuous.”


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Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on Proverbs 13:22". Joseph Benson's Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/proverbs-13.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Heirs. This was more observable under the old law: yet we often seem the distress to which the unjust are exposed. De male quæsitis non gaudet tertius hæres. (Calmet)


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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Proverbs 13:22". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/proverbs-13.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

good. Figure of speech Anadiplosis (App-6). Hebrew text Proverbs 13:21 ends with "good", which is repeated at the beginning of Proverbs 13:22.

an inheritance. Not necessarily wealth; but a good name, &c.

children"s = sons". Illustrations: Jacob (Genesis 48:15, Genesis 48:16, Genesis 48:20); Caleb (Numbers 14:24. Joshua 14:14).


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Proverbs 13:22". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/proverbs-13.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

A good man leaveth an inheritance to his children's children: and the wealth of the sinner is laid up for the just.

A good (man) leaveth an inheritance to his children's children - i:e., presuming that the children and grand-children taught by the good man follow his steps.

And the wealth of the sinner is laid up for the just. This is one instance of the principle in Proverbs 13:21. The expression, "is laid up," implies that there are hidden ways whereby God sustains the godly, though they do not see it with their eyes nor can comprehend it with their mind (T. Cartwright).


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Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Proverbs 13:22". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/proverbs-13.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(22) A good man.—As this corresponds to the “just” man in the next line, who is one who “renders to all their due” (see above on Proverbs 10:2), it probably has the meaning here of “liberal,” “unselfish;” such a one gains the promise given in Proverbs 11:25.


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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Proverbs 13:22". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/proverbs-13.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

A good man leaveth an inheritance to his children's children: and the wealth of the sinner is laid up for the just.
leaveth
Genesis 17:7,8; Psalms 25:12,13; 102:28; 112:2; 128:6
the wealth
28:8; Job 27:16,17; Ecclesiastes 2:26

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Proverbs 13:22". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/proverbs-13.html.

Preacher's Complete Homiletical Commentary

MAIN HOMILETICS OF Pro

AS INHERITANCE INCORRUPTIBLE

I. A good man has always spiritual inheritance to leave his children. He has always his own holy character and example. And this is often of great service to them in a material point of view. Men who have obtained fame in the world leave their children the inheritance of a famous name, which is often a fortune in itself. The son or daughter of a famous man can command positions of worldly advantage which are closed against the children of obscure parents. But while a famous father can leave his fame as an inheritance to his children he cannot ensure to them the possession of the genius by which he gained it. Talent is not hereditary, and it often happens that a very gifted father has very common-place children. But moral worth—a godly character—is an inheritance that not only makes a son respected in the world for his father's sake, but is very likely to make him also a partaker of the same godliness. A good man's character is not hereditary, but it is very apt to propagate other characters of the same kind. This inheritance of a good man is an incorruptible inheritance. No inheritance of lands or money are entirely out of reach of the changes and chances of human life, but the example, and the memory, and the blessings which have come from a godly parentage, make an inheritance which, like the heavenly one, "fadeth not away." It is the best possible safeguard that a father can leave his children against the temptations of the world, the flesh, and the devil. The remembrance of what belief in the Gospel did for a holy father has saved many a son from drifting on the quicksands of infidelity. There have been times in the history of many a child of godly parents, when such an anchor has been the only one which has held them from "making shipwreck of faith" (1Ti ). The character of a good man is such an indisputable fact, and is so entirely unexplainable on any other ground than that of the existence of a supernatural and Divine power, that it constitutes an unanswerable argument for the truth of revelation. And so with every other form of evil that assails men. The inheritance which Christ has left to his disciples—to His spiritual children—is His character. This has produced and reproduced its own kind through all the ages since His sojourn upon earth. This has held them to the faith in the dark days of persecution. And when the infidel himself has come face to face with it, even he has been compelled to acknowledge the intrinsic worth of the children's portion. This holy life, lived among sinful men, has been the "unsearchable riches" (Eph 3:8) of one Christian generation after another, for more than eighteen centuries, and it is by virtue of this inheritance that good men have been enabled to transmit to their posterity their own godly lives and examples.

II. A good man may have a material as well as a moral inheritance to bequeath. He may possess both character and substance. But the fact that a man is good is no guarantee that he will have any worldly wealth to leave behind him. If Lord Bacon's assertion be correct, that "Prosperity is the blessing of the Old Testament, and adversity the blessing of the New," he is quite as likely to die poor as rich. Still there is often a blessing of some amount of material riches given to honest labour, and probably there are far more godly men in proportion to their number, who acquire some inheritance to leave behind them, than there are godless men (See on Pro , etc.)

III. Good men sometimes inherit wealth which has been gathered by bad men. It is not a universal rule, but it may be oftener fulfilled than we are aware of. It may be inherited by generations of wicked men and at last come into the hands of a just one. That it should be so is seen to be a wise and good law of providence.

1. Because a good man will make a far better use of "the mammon of unrighteousness." He will use it to minister to both the bodily and spiritual needs of his fellow-creatures as well as his own.

2. Because the laid-up wealth of the wicked has often been obtained by defrauding the good. God does not always cause it to be repaid to the identical persons who were thus defrauded, but He may often cause it to be restored to identical characters. This proverb must be taken to assert the straightforward motion of the wheels of providence, although by reason of their "great height" (Eze ),—their vast circumference—they take a long time to go round.

OUTLINES AND SUGGESTIVE COMMENTS

The usurer lightly begets blind children that cannot see to keep what their father left them. But when the father is gone to hell for gathering, the son often follows for scattering, But God is just.—T. Adams.

That the wealth of the sinner is laid up for the just appears to have been a prominent feature of the Old Dispensation (chap. Pro ; Job 27:16-17), and it will be openly renewed in the latter-day glory of the Church (Isa 61:6).—Bridges.

This is the direct promise of heaven (Psa ; Pro 22:6). That it ever fails, must be by palpable neglect. A man may be saved himself, and lose his children; but the Bible speaks of this as the parent's fault (1Sa 3:13; Pro 13:24), and brands it as the great curse upon the earth (Mal 4:6). While the sinner not only cannot send down his wealth, but cannot himself possess it. It is a curse to him. It will be used for the saints (Mat 25:28).—Miller.

It is quite clear that in this and other passages an inheritance is regarded as a good, and that no blame is attached to "the good man" who leaves it to his children. The principle expressed in the latter clause is the same as that laid down by the apostle, "All things are yours," and, among other things, "the world." That may most truly be called mine, from which I derive the greatest possible benefit it can be made to yield. It would be strange, indeed, were I to wish anything else, or anything more.… The wicked man calls his wealth his own. But it is God's. God is the friend of His children, and holds that property, like everything else, for their good; so that it is theirs by being His.—Wardlaw.

Personal goodness profiteth for posterity. God gives not to His servants some small annuity for life only, as great men used to do, but "keepeth mercy for thousands" of generations "of them that fear Him." The opposite is not perpetually and universally true of every wicked person, … but, together with their lands, they bequeath their children their sins and punishments, which is far worse than that legacy of leprosy that Joab left his issue (2Sa ).—Trapp.

An expression of trust like that in Ecc , that in the long run the anomalies of the world are rendered even.—Plumptre.


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Bibliography
Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on Proverbs 13:22". Preacher's Complete Homiletical Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/phc/proverbs-13.html. Funk & Wagnalls Company, 1892.

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