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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Proverbs 14:29

 

 

He who is slow to anger has great understanding, But he who is quick-tempered exalts folly.

Adam Clarke Commentary

That is hasty of spirit - רוח קצר ketsar ruach, "the short of spirit;" one that is easily irritated; and, being in a passion, he is agitated so as to be literally short of breath. Here put in opposition to אפים ארך erech appayim, long of nostrils; see on Proverbs 14:17; (note); and of the same import with St. Paul's μακροθυμια, longsuffering, longmindedness. See on Ephesians 4:2; (note).


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Proverbs 14:29". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/proverbs-14.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Exalteth folly - Lifts it up, as it were, on high, and exposes it to the gaze of all men.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Proverbs 14:29". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/proverbs-14.html. 1870.

The Biblical Illustrator

Proverbs 14:29

He that is slow to wrath is of great understanding.

Sinful anger

The scope of these words is to beat down sinful anger, a common evil, producing much mischief. In them there is--

1. The excellency of meekness, and--

2. The mischief of passionateness, and the evil thereof.

I. The man that is slow of wrath or anger snows great wisdom and understanding in his meek and peaceable disposition and deportment.

1. The nature of wrath or anger in general. Anger or wrath is a passion which is not of itself sinful, but is either good or ill, as it is regulated; and so it differs from fretting, murmuring, and envy, which can never be good or allowable in any case. Anger is a servant to the meek, but a master to the passionate. The passion of anger is like wind to a ship. If there be a dead calm, and the winds blow not at all, or very weakly, the ship does not make way. And if men be so stupid, indolent, and unconcerned, that their spirits will not stir in them, whatever dishonour they see done to God, these are standing still in the way to heaven. If the wind is brisk enough, but yet is contrary, the ship will at best have much ado with it, and may be driven into a shore which the crew desired not to see. So if men’s anger be in itself sinful, it cannot fail of an unhappy event, driving the soul into much sin. Though the wind be not contrary, yet if it be too impetuous and violent, it may dash the ship on rocks and split it. Though a man’s anger may have a just ground, yet if it prove excessive and boisterous it may run men headlong into great mischiefs. The ingredients of anger are, a commotion or trouble of the spirit, which ariseth from an apprehension of an injury. Hatred, which is bent against the injury apprehended. Grief, on account of the party or parties injured. A desire for the vindication of the right and honour of the injured. Anger is a passion uneasy, to one’s self, compounded of bitter ingredients and uneasy passions; in which one walks on slippery ground, where he is apt to fall headlong.

2. What is it to be slow of wrath? Being slow to take up anger in one’s own cause. Managing it warily, when it is taken up, being guided by the light of reason, and not by the fire of passion, and being easy to lay it down. The more slow that anger burns the easier it is to quench.

3. He who is slow of wrath is of great understanding. Such an one thereby shows his duty to God, his sovereign lord, and to himself. He shows that he understands Satan’s diligence and malice against him, his real interest, and human nature. Be slow to wrath. It is a heaven-like disposition. The comfort of society depends on it. It is necessary for a man’s own comfort. It helps to keep ourselves and others from the snare of sin. But there is such a thing as sinful slackness to anger, which may make us omit duties of justice and charity.

II. The passionate man proclaims his folly and naughtiness in his unbridled passion and sinful anger.

1. The nature of sinful anger. Anger is sinful when it riseth without a just ground, having no cause for it assigned by grace or right reason as just. It may rise without any cause at all; or vainly, upon some slight or trifling occasion unworthy of such notice. When it keeps no due proportion with the offence. When it is not directed to the honour of God, and the destruction of sin. When it makes no due difference between the offender and the offence. When the effects of it are sinful. When it is kept up and continued beyond due time.

2. The kinds of sinful anger. Sinful in itself; where there is no just ground. Accidentally sinful; when ill-managed. There is an open and impetuous anger called wrath. A pursuing, implacable wrath, called anger, which is set upon revenge.

3. The effects of sinful anger. Mischievous to the body. Fires the tongue in a particular manner. Disturbs society. Overclouds reason. Unfits a man for duty. The passionate man proclaims his folly. He shows himself to be a proud man, a weak man, incapable of ruling himself; an unmortified man; a rash and precipitant man; an unwatchful man. Practical improvement of this subject--Use of humiliation and conviction; of exhortation. Desire of provoking and stirring up others to passion; for God’s sake, and for your neighbour’s sake, as well as for your own sake. “Watch and pray, that ye enter not into temptation.” And if at any time you are caught, hasten out of the snare. Dallying with temptation is the fair way to entangle you further; therefore fly from it as from a serpent, lest ye be stung to death thereby. (T. Boston, D.D.)

Religion the restraint of impetuous passion

Death is at all times appalling to nature; but never so frightful as when it comes by the hands of the public executioner. To this the text provides an antidote. The man who lives in the “fear of the Lord” is not likely to die an untimely, much less an ignominious death. The case of martyrs is excepted.

I. Explain the nature of true religion. What is the principle, its rule, and its object.

1. Its principle is the love of God. This love to God must be supreme. And wherever love is present, it will be evidenced by a desire to comply with the wishes, and obey the commands of the person loved.

2. That the rule of true religion is the revealed will of God, as found in the Scriptures.

3. The object of true religion is the glory of God. Religion in the heart can never be satisfied with anything short of the Divine glory as the great object of life.

II. While destitute of the influence of religion, men are perpetually in danger of being overcome by the impetuosity of their passions.

1. Principles directly opposite to those of true religion exist in the human heart.

2. Circumstances are continually arising which may call these unholy principles into active operation.

3. There is grave danger, in the absence of true religion, that excited passion will prevail. Impetuosity can be effectually restrained and subdued only by the power of religious principle. (Essex Remembrancer.)

Slow to wrath

Lord Macaulay has remarked that there are some unhappy men constitutionally prone to the darker passions, men to whom bitter words are as natural as snarling and biting to a ferocious dog; and he asserts that to come into the world with this wretched mental disease is a greater calamity than to be born blind or deaf. A man, he proceeds to say, who, having such a temper, keeps it in subjection, and constrains himself to behave habitually with justice and humanity towards those who are in his power, seems worthy of the highest admiration. “There have been instances of this self command; and they are among the most signal triumphs of philosophy and religion.” In eulogies of the Emperor Justinian this characteristic is not to be slighted, that he was “a master of the angry passions, which rage with such destructive violence in the breast of a despot.” Of Mohammed we are told that he was naturally irritable, but had brought his temper under great control, so that even in the self-indulgent intercourse of domestic life he was kind and tolerant. “I served him from the time I was eight years old,” said his servant Anus, “and he never scolded me for anything, though things were spoilt by me.” Adam Smith traces from school and playground the progress and, so to speak, natural history of self-control, and shows on what grounds, and in what way, the child advances in self-command, studies to be more and more master of itself, and tries to exercise over its own feelings “a discipline which the practice of the longest life is very seldom sufficient to bring to complete perfection.” (W. Arnot, D.D.)


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Bibliography
Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "Proverbs 14:29". The Biblical Illustrator. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/proverbs-14.html. 1905-1909. New York.

Coffman's Commentaries on the Bible

"He that is slow to anger is of great understanding; But he that is hasty of spirit exalteth folly."

A variation of this is: "A meek-spirited man is a healer of the heart, but a sensitive heart is a corruption of the bones."[32] Nothing is any more dangerous than association with a person of quick and violent temper, who may become offended on the slightest of pretexts. Such persons are sometimes said to have "a chip on their shoulder." They can even become violent upon the most trivial of excuses.


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James Burton Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.

Bibliography
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Proverbs 14:29". "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/proverbs-14.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

He that is slow to wrath is of great understanding,.... Or "long in wrath"F5ארך אפים "longus iris", Vatablus; "longus naribus", Montanus; "longus narium", Schultens. ; it is long before he is angry; he is longsuffering, bears much and long, is very patient; such an one appears to understand himself and human nature, and has a great command over his passions; which shows him to be a man of great wisdom and understanding;

but he that is hasty of spirit exalteth folly; or is "short of spirit"F6קצר רוח "brevis spiritu", Montanus, Vatblus. Cocceius, Merceus, Michaelis; "curtus spiritu", Schultens. ; is soon angry; presently discovers resentment in his words, looks, and gestures; such an one "exalts folly", prefers it to wisdom, sets it above himself, and makes it his master: or he "lifts" itF7מרום "attollit", Mercerus, Piscator; "alte proclamat", Schultens; "elevat", Baynus. up; exposes his folly to public view, so that it is seen of all men to his disgrace.


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Proverbs 14:29". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/proverbs-14.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

understanding — (Compare Proverbs 14:17).

hasty — (Compare Proverbs 14:17).

exalteth folly — makes it conspicuous, as if delighting to honor it.


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This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Proverbs 14:29". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/proverbs-14.html. 1871-8.

Keil & Delitzsch Commentary on the Old Testament

29 He that is slow to anger is rich in understanding;

But he that is easily excited carries off folly.

ארך אפּים (constr. of ארך ) is he who puts off anger long, viz., the outbreak of anger, האריך , Proverbs 19:11, i.e. , lets it not come in, but shuts it out long ( μακρόθυμος = βραδὺς εἰς ὀργήν , James 1:19); and קצר־רוּח , he who in his spirit and temper, viz., as regards anger (for רוּח denotes also the breathing out and snorting, Isaiah 25:4; Isaiah 33:11), is short, i.e. , (since shortness of time is meant) is rash and suddenly (cf. quick to anger, praeceps in iram , 17a) breaks out with it, not ὀλιγόψυχος (but here ὀξύθυμος ), as the lxx translate 17a. The former, who knows how to control his affections, shows himself herein as “great in understanding” (cf. 2 Samuel 23:20), or as a “man of great understanding” (Lat. multus prudentiâ ); the contrary is he who suffers himself to be impelled by his affections into hasty, inconsiderate action, which is here expressed more actively by מרים אוּלת . Does this mean that he bears folly to the view (Luther, Umbreit, Bertheau, Elster, and others)? But for that idea the Mishle style has other expressions, Proverbs 12:23; Proverbs 13:16; Proverbs 15:2, cf. Proverbs 14:17. Or does it mean that he makes folly high, i.e. , shows himself highly foolish (lxx, Syr., Targum, Fleischer, and others)? But that would be expressed rather by הגדּיל or הרבּה . Or is it he heightens folly (Löwenstein, Hitzig)? But the remark that the angry ebullition is itself a gradual heightening of the foolish nature of such an one is not suitable, for the choleric man, who lets the evenness of his disposition be interrupted by a breaking forth of anger, is by no means also in himself a fool. Rashi is right when he says, מפרישה לחלקו , i.e. , (to which also Fleischer gives the preference) aufert pro portione sua stultitiam . The only appropriate parallel according to which it is to be explained, is Proverbs 3:35. But not as Ewald: he lifts up folly, which lies as it were before his feet on his life's path; but: he takes off folly, in the sense of Leviticus 6:8, i.e. , he carries off folly, receives a portion of folly; for as to others, so also to himself, when he returns to calm blood, that which he did in his rage must appear as folly and madness.


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Bibliography
Keil, Carl Friedrich & Delitzsch, Franz. "Commentary on Proverbs 14:29". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/kdo/proverbs-14.html. 1854-1889.

Matthew Henry's Complete Commentary on the Bible

Note, 1. Meekness is wisdom. He rightly understands himself, and his duty and interest, the infirmities of human nature, and the constitution of human society, who is slow to anger, and knows how to excuse the faults of others as well as his own, how to adjourn his resentments, and moderate them, so as by no provocation to be put out of the possession of his own soul. A mild patient man is really to be accounted an intelligent man, one that learns of Christ, who is Wisdom itself. 2. Unbridled passion is folly proclaimed: He that is hasty of spirit, whose heart is tinder to every spark of provocation, that is all fire and tow, as we say, he thinks hereby to magnify himself and make those about stand in awe of him, whereas really he exalts his own folly; he makes it known, as that which is lifted up is visible to all, and he submits himself to it as to the government of one that is exalted.


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Bibliography
Henry, Matthew. "Complete Commentary on Proverbs 14:29". "Matthew Henry Complete Commentary on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mhm/proverbs-14.html. 1706.

Matthew Henry's Concise Commentary on the Bible

A mild, patient man is one that learns of Christ, who is Wisdom itself. Unbridled passion is folly made known.


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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Henry, Matthew. "Concise Commentary on Proverbs 14:29". "Matthew Henry Concise Commentary

on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mhn/proverbs-14.html. 1706.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

He that is slow to wrath is of great understanding: but he that is hasty of spirit exalteth folly.

Exalteth — Heb. lifteth up, like a banner, makes it known and visible to all men.


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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Proverbs 14:29". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/proverbs-14.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Proverbs 14:29 [He that is] slow to wrath [is] of great understanding: but [he that is] hasty of spirit exalteth folly.

Ver. 29. He that is slow to anger is of great understanding.] "The wisdom from above is first pure, then peaceable," tractable. Thunder, hail, tempest, neither trouble nor hurt celestial bodies. Anger may rush into a wise man’s bosom, not rest there; [Ecclesiastes 7:9] it dwells only where it domineers, and that is only where a fool is master of the family. A wise man either receives it not or soon rids it. Be slow to wrath, is a lesson that God hath engraven, as one wittily observeth in our very nature. For the last letter that any child ordinarily speaketh is R, and that is the radical letter of all words of strife and wrath in almost all languages? (a)

But he that is hasty of spirit exalteth folly.] He sets it up upon a pole, as it were; he makes an Oh yes, and proclaims his own folly by his ireful looks, words, gestures, actions, as that furious friar Feuardensius doth in his book called Theomachia Calvinistica, where he took up his pen with as much passion and wrath as any soldier takes up his sword. Such another hasty fool was friar Alphonsus, the Spaniard, who, reasoning with Mr Bradford, martyr, was in a wonderful rage chafing with om and cho; so that if Bradford had been anything hot, one house could not have held them. (b)


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Proverbs 14:29". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/proverbs-14.html. 1865-1868.

The Popular Commentary by Paul E. Kretzmann

v. 29. He that is slow to wrath, he who is able to control himself, who has himself well in hand at all times, is of great understanding, he will always have a clear mind to discriminate properly; but he that is hasty of spirit, rash and quick-tempered, exalteth folly, is bound to carry foolishness to excess, to make a fool of himself.


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Bibliography
Kretzmann, Paul E. Ph. D., D. D. "Commentary on Proverbs 14:29". "Kretzmann's Popular Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/kpc/proverbs-14.html. 1921-23.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Proverbs 14:29. He that is slow to wrath, &c.— If we considered patience only as a moral virtue, or as a gracious sobriety and temper in subduing and regulating our affections and passions, as an absence of that anger and rage and fury, which usually transports us upon trivial occasions, we could not but acknowledge the great advantage that men have by it. Solomon requires this to make a wise man: He that is slow to anger, says he, is of great understanding; and, indeed, there is nothing so much corrupts and destroys and infatuates the understanding as anger and passion; inasmuch as men of very indifferent parts, by the advantage of temper and composure, are much wiser, and fitter for great actions, and are usually more prosperous, than men of more subtle and sublime parts, of more quickness and fancy, with the warmth and choler which many times attend those compositions.


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Bibliography
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Proverbs 14:29". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/proverbs-14.html. 1801-1803.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Is of great understanding; showeth great and true wisdom in conquering his sinful and shameful passions.

Exalteth, Heb. lifteth up, like a banner; makes it known and visible to all men.


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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Proverbs 14:29". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/proverbs-14.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

29. Slow to wrath — Is patient, forbearing, self-controlling.

Is of great understanding — Shows himself to be a man of sense and prudence.

Exalteth folly — Lifts it up, makes it conspicuous. “Exhibits folly.” — Speaker’s Commentary. “Enhances folly.” — Miller.


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Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Proverbs 14:29". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/proverbs-14.html. 1874-1909.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

Proverbs 14:29. He that is slow to wrath, &c. — He who is not soon provoked to anger by reproaches or ill usage, shows himself to be a wise and great man; but he that is hasty of spirit exalteth folly — Exposes his folly, and makes it apparent to every body. Hebrew, מרים אולת, lifteth up folly, displays it like a banner.


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Bibliography
Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on Proverbs 14:29". Joseph Benson's Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/proverbs-14.html. 1857.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

understanding = discernment. Hebrew. tebunah. See note on Proverbs 1:2.

hasty of spirit. Illustrations: Rehoboam (1Ki 12. Compare Proverbs 14:16, above); Jehoram (2 Kings 5:7); Martha (Luke 10:40).

spirit. Hebrew. ruach. App-9.


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Proverbs 14:29". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/proverbs-14.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

He that is slow to wrath is of great understanding: but he that is hasty of spirit exalteth folly.

(He that is) slow to wrath (is) of great understanding: but (he that is) hasty of spirit exalteth folly - (Proverbs 14:17 :) "Exalteth folly," like one's banner lifted up so as to be seen by all; and so is of small understanding. The raising of the voice aloud accompanies this raising up of folly. "He that is slow to wrath" depresseth folly; and so "is of great understanding."


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Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Proverbs 14:29". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/proverbs-14.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(29) He that is hasty of spirit exalteth folly—i.e., brings it into view, or shows himself highly foolish. Or it may signify, “he takes up and carries away folly as his portion,” as Proverbs 3:35 may be translated, “fools receive shame for their portion.”


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Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Proverbs 14:29". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/proverbs-14.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

He that is slow to wrath is of great understanding: but he that is hasty of spirit exalteth folly.
slow
17; 15:18; 16:32; Numbers 12:3; Matthew 11:29; 1 Corinthians 13:4,5; James 1:19; 3:17,18
but
22:24,25; 25:8,28; Ecclesiastes 7:9; Daniel 3:19-25; Matthew 2:16
hasty
Heb. short. exalteth.
4:8; Ecclesiastes 10:6

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Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Proverbs 14:29". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/proverbs-14.html.

Preacher's Complete Homiletical Commentary

MAIN HOMILETICS OF Pro

GREAT UNDERSTANDING

I. There are times and occasions when wrath is not only allowable, but right. A man who is incapable of being angry lacks an element of perfection. Anger against wrong-doing is possible without any feeling of vindictiveness or malice towards the wrong-doer. There is much in the Bible about the "wrath of God" (Rom ), although He is "love" (1Jn 4:8). A child does not honour a parent the less, but the more, because he knows that parent can be angry when there is just occasion. Neither could we reverence God if He was a Being who could not be displeased.

II. But a man who is slow to wrath shows—

1. That he understands himself. Even the holy and all-perfect God is "slow to anger" (Neh ). Although He could not misjudge any creature, and although He could never by any possibility allow His wrath to exceed the bounds of perfect justice and righteousness, He is not "soon angry." The man who understands his own frailty and short-sightedness will not allow anger to take possession of his spirit in a hurry, if he is to "be angry and sin not" (Eph 4:26), he must only be angry after due reflection upon the cause of his anger.

2. That he understands others. Hasty and passionate anger never convinces the offender of his guilt, but awakens wrath in his breast also. But the displeasure which is the result of calm consideration may carry some weight with it. On this subject see also Homiletics on Pro .

OUTLINES AND SUGGESTIVE COMMENTS

"He that is hasty of spirit exalteth folly." He gives folly for the time being the throne and sceptre of his mind, and fulfils her preposterous and mischievous dictates. And when reason, for the time deposed, resumes her vacated seat, she finds no easy task before her to repair the evils which have been done in the brief but stormy reign of passion.—Wardlaw.

I. The passion of anger is like wind to the ship: so it is to the soul called to steer its course to Immanuel's land.

1. If there be a dead calm, and the winds blow not at all, or very weakly, the ship does not make way. And if men be so stupid, indolent, and unconcerned, that their spirits will not stir in them, whatever dishonour they see done to God, these are standing still in the way to heaven. And many there be, who are all fire in their own matters, but in those of God their hearts are dead as a stone. Such was the case of Eli: "His sons made themselves vile, and he restrained them not" (1Sa ). It was not so with Paul: for "his spirit was stirred in him, when he saw the city wholly given to idolatry" (Act 17:16).

2. If the wind is brisk enough, but yet is contrary, the ship will at best have much ado with it, and may be driven into a shore which the crew desired not to see. So if men's anger be in itself sinful, if their anger burn against what is good and just: such anger cannot fail of an unhappy event.

3. Though the wind be not contrary, yet if it be too impetuous and violent, it may dash the ship on rocks, and split it. So though men's anger may have a just ground, yet if it prove excessive and boisterous, it may run men headlong into great mischiefs. Oft-times reason lets anger into the breast; but then anger turns out reason to the door, and carries on all precipitantly without reason or discretion: like one that brings in coal to his hearth, because of the cold, but unwarily lets it fall on tow, which sets the house on fire. II. He that is slow to wrath.

1. Is slow to take up anger in his own cause. It is wisdom indeed to be very tender of God's honour, but more indifferent about our own personal interests, as Moses was.

2. Manages it warily when it is taken up. He finds himself on slippery ground, and is therefore slow in his motions.

3. Is easy to lay it down (Eph ). He shuts it out when there is no more use for it. III. The passionate man proclaims his folly—he proclaims himself—

1. A proud man, and the proud man is a fool in God's account and in the account of all who understand themselves.

2. A weak man. He is a slave to his passions.

3. An unwatchful man, who has his enemies within him, without him, round about him, and yet cannot be brought to stand on his guard (Pro ).—Boston.

Wise anger is like fire from the flint, there is a great ado to bring it out; and when it does come, it is out again immediately.—Henry.

The intoxication of anger, like that of the grape, shows us to others, but hides us from ourselves.—Southgate's "Many Thoughts on Many Things."

The heaviest body is slowest in going, but his treading is the surest; in like manner, he that is slow to anger recompenses the dulness of his steps with the soundness of his proceeding; for he taketh leisure (as it were) to look to his ways. Tertullian says, "Where the injury is little, there is no need of patience; but where the injury is great, there is the help of patience more needful against it. If they be small wrongs, contemn them for their smallness; if great wrongs, by patience give way unto them in respect of their greatness." The original of hasty, is short-winded. For as haste in going maketh the breath to be short, so the haste of the soul to anger maketh that to puff and blow on every small occasion; so that the soul is as it were climbing up a great hill, there to exalt her folly, for all to behold it.—Jermin.


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Bibliography
Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on Proverbs 14:29". Preacher's Complete Homiletical Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/phc/proverbs-14.html. Funk & Wagnalls Company, 1892.

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