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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Proverbs 14:33

 

 

Wisdom rests in the heart of one who has understanding, But in the hearts of fools it is made known.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Omit “that which is.” “Wisdom” is the subject of both clauses. She is “made nown,” i. e., by the very force of contrast, in the midst of fools; or she is reserved and reticent in the one, noisy and boastful in the other. The Septuagint and some other versions get over the difficulty, by reading “Wisdom is not made known.”


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Proverbs 14:33". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/proverbs-14.html. 1870.

Coffman's Commentaries on the Bible

"Wisdom resteth in the heart of him that hath understanding; But that which is in the inward part of fools is made known."

We are not sure what this proverb means. The RSV renders it: "Wisdom abides in the mind of a man of understanding, but it is not known in the heart of fools."[38] Toy's paraphrase is: "A man of sense, not being anxious to gain applause, keeps it to himself (reserving it for an appropriate occasion); but the fool, anxious to shine, or ignorant of propriety, airs what he thinks is his wisdom at every opportunity."[39]


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James Burton Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.

Bibliography
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Proverbs 14:33". "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/proverbs-14.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Wisdom resteth in the heart of him that hath understanding,.... It is in his heart, as the treasury where it is laid up, and where it is kept in safety; here it lies hid and undiscerned, unmolested and undisturbed; no noise is made about it, or any ostentation of it; it dwells quietly and constantly there;

but that which is in the midst of fools is made known; the least share of knowledge which such persons have, or think they have, does not lie long in the midst of them; they take every opportunity of showing it to others, or of letting others know what they have attained to; and thereby, instead of getting the character of wise and prudent men, obtain that of fools; for, though a prudent man is communicative of his knowledge to others, it is at proper times, and in proper places, and to proper persons, which fools do not observe; but, without any manner of judgment or discretion, or regard to persons, places, and seasons, vainly thrust out their knowledge, and so proclaim their folly. The Syriac version is,

"in the heart of fools it shall not be known;'

it has no place there.


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Proverbs 14:33". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/proverbs-14.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

Wisdom resteth in the heart of him that hath understanding: but [that which is] m in the midst of fools is made known.

(m) Forasmuch as they are convicted by it, and silenced.

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Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Proverbs 14:33". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/proverbs-14.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

resteth — preserved in quietness for use, while fools blazon their folly (Proverbs 12:23; Proverbs 13:16).


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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Proverbs 14:33". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/proverbs-14.html. 1871-8.

Keil & Delitzsch Commentary on the Old Testament

33 Wisdom rests in the heart of the man of understanding;

But the heart of fools it maketh itself known.

Most interpreters know not what to make of the second line here. The lxx (and after it the Syr.), and as it appears, also Aquila and Theodotion, insert οὐ ; the Targ. improves the Peshito, for it inserts אוּלת (so that Proverbs 12:23; Proverbs 13:16, and Proverbs 15:2 are related). And Abulwalîd explains: in the heart of fools it is lost; Euchel: it reels about; but these are imaginary interpretations resting on a misunderstanding of the passages, in which ידע means to come to feel, and הודיע to give to feel (to punish, correct). Kimchi rightly adheres to the one ascertained meaning of the words, according to which the Venet . μέσον δὲ ἀφρόνων γνωσθήσεται . So also the translation of Jerome: et indoctos quosque ( quoque ) erudiet , is formed, for he understands the “and is manifest among fools” (Luther) not merely, as C. B. Michaelis, after the saying: opposita juxta se posita magis elucescunt , but of a becoming manifest, which is salutary to these. Certainly בּקרב can mean among = in the circle, of Proverbs 15:31; but if, as here and e.g. , Jeremiah 31:31, בקרב is interchanged with בלב , and if חכמה בקרב is the subject spoken of, as 1 Kings 3:28, then בקרב does not mean among (in the midst of), but in the heart of the fool. According to this, the Talmud rightly, by comparison with the current proverb ( Mezîa 85b): אסתירא בלגינא קישׁ קישׁ קריא , a stater in a flaggon cries Kish, Kish , i.e. , makes much clatter. In the heart of the understanding wisdom rests, i.e. , remains silent and still, for the understanding feels himself personally happy in its possession, endeavours always the more to deepen it, and lets it operate within; on the contrary, wisdom in the heart of fools makes itself manifest: they are not able to keep to themselves the wisdom which they imagine they possess, or the portion of wisdom which is in reality theirs; but they think, as it is said in Persius: Scire tuum nihil est nisi scire hoc te sciat alter . They discredit and waste their little portion of wisdom (instead of thinking on its increase) by obtrusive ostentatious babbling.


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Bibliography
Keil, Carl Friedrich & Delitzsch, Franz. "Commentary on Proverbs 14:33". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/kdo/proverbs-14.html. 1854-1889.

Matthew Henry's Complete Commentary on the Bible

Observe, 1. Modesty is the badge of wisdom. He that is truly wise hides his treasure, so as not to boast of it (Matthew 13:44), though he does not hide his talent, so as not to trade with it. His wisdom rests in his heart; he digests what he knows, and has it ready to him, but does not unseasonably talk of it and make a noise with it. The heart is the seat of the affections, and there wisdom must rest in the practical love of it, and not swim in the head. 2. Openness and ostentation are a mark of folly. If fools have a little smattering of knowledge, they take all occasions, though very foreign, to produce it, and bring it in by head and shoulders. Or the folly that is in the midst of fools is made known by their forwardness to talk. Many a foolish man takes more pains to show his folly than a wise man thinks it worth his while to take to show his wisdom.


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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Henry, Matthew. "Complete Commentary on Proverbs 14:33". "Matthew Henry Complete Commentary on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mhm/proverbs-14.html. 1706.

Matthew Henry's Concise Commentary on the Bible

Wisdom possesses the heart, and thus regulates the affections and tempers.


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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Henry, Matthew. "Concise Commentary on Proverbs 14:33". "Matthew Henry Concise Commentary

on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mhn/proverbs-14.html. 1706.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Wisdom resteth in the heart of him that hath understanding: but that which is in the midst of fools is made known.

Resteth — Is laid up and hid there.

In the midst — In the heart.

Made known — They will publish in all times and companies.


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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Proverbs 14:33". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/proverbs-14.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Proverbs 14:33 Wisdom resteth in the heart of him that hath understanding: but [that which is] in the midst of fools is made known.

Ver. 33. Wisdom resteth in the heart of him, &c.] He sets not his good parts and practices a-sunning, as vain glorious fools used to do, that they may be praised and applauded. As Jerome calls Crates the philosopher, we may call the whole nation of them so, Gloriae animal, popularis aurae vile mancipium, (a) a base hunter after praise of men. The truly wise concealeth himself till he seeth a fit time, and may be compared to the red rose, which though outwardly not so fragrant, is inwardly far more cordial than the damask, being more thrifty of its sweetness, and reserving it in itself. Or to the violet, which grows low, hangs the head downward, and hides itself with its own leaves; whereas the marigold, of nothing so good a smell, opens and shuts with the sun; which, when it is set, it hangs down the head, as forlorn and desperate. So that which is in the midst of fools is made known. Jehonadab must needs see what zeal Jehu hath for the Lord of hosts; his piety is shored up by popularity, &c.


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Proverbs 14:33". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/proverbs-14.html. 1865-1868.

The Popular Commentary by Paul E. Kretzmann

v. 33. Wisdom resteth in the heart of him that hath understanding, it is quietly safe there, and the wise person carefully guards and increases it; but that which is in the midst of fools is made known, they are always eager and loud in giving their opinion, since they believe themselves to be wise, but they thereby reveal their lack of true understanding, they make known the emptiness of their minds.


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Bibliography
Kretzmann, Paul E. Ph. D., D. D. "Commentary on Proverbs 14:33". "Kretzmann's Popular Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/kpc/proverbs-14.html. 1921-23.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Resteth; is laid up and hid there, and not vainly nor rashly uttered by him, but only upon necessary or fit occasions.

In the midst, i.e. in the heart, which is expressed by this very word, Psalms 64:6, and elsewhere. That folly which is there instead of wisdom; or, that small degree of wisdom or knowledge which they have.

Is made known; they will publish it in all times and companies, without any consideration or discretion.


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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Proverbs 14:33". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/proverbs-14.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

33. Wisdom resteth in the heart of him that hath understanding — Reposeth there, not obtruding itself, or being solicitous of notice.

That which is in the midst of fools (in the heart of such) is made known — Is soon exhibited, both by tongue and act. Comp. Proverbs 10:14; Proverbs 12:16; Proverbs 12:23; Proverbs 13:16; Proverbs 15:2; Proverbs 29:11.


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Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Proverbs 14:33". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/proverbs-14.html. 1874-1909.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

A paraphrase of this verse could be, "A wise man does not parade his knowledge; a fool does." [Note: Kidner, pp111-12.] Fools may have knowledge but not biblical wisdom.

The influence of human speech occupies much of chapter15.


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Bibliography
Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on Proverbs 14:33". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/proverbs-14.html. 2012.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

Proverbs 14:33. Wisdom resteth in the heart, &c. — Is laid up and hid there, and not vainly or rashly uttered by him, but only brought forth upon necessary or fit occasions; but that which is in the midst — That is, in the heart; of fools, is made known — That folly which is there instead of wisdom, or that small degree of wisdom which they have, they will publish in all times and companies, without any consideration or discretion.


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Bibliography
Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on Proverbs 14:33". Joseph Benson's Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/proverbs-14.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

And. Protestants, "but that which is in the midst of fools is made known." (Haydock) --- A vessel full of gold makes no noise, while that which contains only a few pieces sounds much. (Munster.) (Cornelius a Lapide) --- Thus the fool makes a parade of all that he knows. (Calmet) --- Septuagint, "but in the heart of fools, it is not known." (Haydock) --- Aquila and Theodotion have the negation, (Calmet) as well as the Syriac and Arabic. See chap. v. 16. (Kennicott)


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Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Proverbs 14:33". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/proverbs-14.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

But, &c. The verb being feminine, may refer to "wisdom". If so we may render "and [even] in the midst of fools will make itself known".


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Proverbs 14:33". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/proverbs-14.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Wisdom resteth in the heart of him that hath understanding: but that which is in the midst of fools is made known. Wisdom resteth in the heart of him that hath understanding - not merely superficially in the lips, as in the case of those making a display, but in the inmost recesses of "the heart." "Resteth" implies the tranquil and modest spirit of the wise, and the permanence of their keeping of wisdom; and especially that it is the fruit of the Spirit from above descending and abiding on them (Numbers 11:25-26; Isaiah 11:2; 2 Kings 2:15. Contrast Ecclesiastes 7:9). The wise does not draw forth his wisdom from its resting-place within his heart at random, but in proper place and time, as the occasion may require.

But (that which is) in the midst (in the inmost part) of fools is made known - namely, their folly to be supplied from the contrary to "wisdom" in the parallel clause, 'Exhibits itself to be known.' Fools cannot long disguise their folly; it is sure to betray itself in unseasonable speaking at random, without choice or judgment (Proverbs 10:14; Proverbs 12:23; Proverbs 13:16). The Hebrew adage says, 'A vessel full of coins will make no noise; but if there be only one coin in it, it will make a rattle.' The more learned one is, the more modest he will be; the more unlearned, the more presumptuous and ostentatious.


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Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Proverbs 14:33". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/proverbs-14.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(33) But that which is in the midst of fools is made known.—“Wisdom” is the subject of this as of the former half of the verse. “Wisdom rests in the heart of him that hath understanding;” he does not care to drag it out and exhibit it, but the fool cannot keep to himself anything which he thinks he knows.


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Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Proverbs 14:33". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/proverbs-14.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Wisdom resteth in the heart of him that hath understanding: but that which is in the midst of fools is made known.
12:16,23; 13:16; 15:2,28; 29:11; Ecclesiastes 10:3

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Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Proverbs 14:33". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/proverbs-14.html.

Preacher's Complete Homiletical Commentary

MAIN HOMILETICS OF Pro

THE HIDDEN MADE MANIFEST

I. The God-ordained place for moral wisdom—"the heart." The divinely ordained place for the sap of the vine is its root.

1. It has its centre and spring there, that thence it may diffuse itself into every branch and leaf, and give life and health to the whole tree. So the divinely-ordained place for moral wisdom is the heart—the affections of a man. If it has its seat there it will certainly influence all his thoughts, and words, and deeds.

2. It is not only the most influential part of a man, but it is the most secure. There, if anywhere, it is out of the reach of harm. If it is only in the head—in the intellectual part of a man—temptation may rob him of it—false reasoning or adversity may shake it from its seat, but if it has hold of the heart, it will hold its own against every foe.

3. It is the only place from which it can reach and bless other human hearts. The sap of the tree must issue direct from its root if there is to be fruit that will sustain and give satisfaction to the eater. So a life will bring forth no fruit to feed others unless its religion is a religion of the heart. There is no way to the heart except from the heart, those who have only an intellectual hold upon moral wisdom cannot feed hungry souls.

4. It is the only place whence can issue glory to God. The whole man, spirit and soul and body, must be under the guidance of moral wisdom if he is to render acceptable service to God. Nothing less will satisfy Him who "searches the heart of the children of men" (Jer ). If the heart is right, the external service will not be wanting. (See Homiletics and Comments on chap. Pro 4:23).

II. Where this wisdom of the heart is lacking, the life will betray it. In all natural life there is a law by which its hidden secrets are manifested in outward signs. The health of the root is seen in the health of the tree, the disease of the internal bodily organs manifests itself in the outward appearance. So it is with moral health and disease. However men may try to appear what they are not, the natural tendency of human nature often proves too strong for the artificial restraint that is put upon it, and sooner or later men reveal what they really are. "That which is in the midst of moral fools is made known," although time is needed for the folly fully to develop itself.

OUTLINES AND SUGGESTIVE COMMENTS

"Resteth" implies the tranquil and modest spirit of the wise, and the permanence of their keeping of wisdom; and especially that it is the fruit of the spirit from above descending and abiding on them (Num ; Isa 11:2; 2Ki 2:15). Contrast Ecc 7:9. The wise does not draw forth his wisdom from its resting place within his heart at random, but in proper place and time, as the occasion may require. But fools cannot long disguise their folly (see chap. Pro 10:14; Pro 12:23; Pro 13:16). The Hebrew adage says, "A vessel full of coins will make no noise; but if there be only one coin in it, it will make a rattle." The more learned one is, the more modest he will be; the more unlearned, the more presumptuous and ostentatious.—Fausset.

In the heart of the understanding wisdom remains silent and still, for the understanding feels himself personally happy in its possession, endeavours all the more to deepen it, and lets it operate within.—Deliztsch.

There she keepeth residence and there she ruleth, and thither she bringeth her treasures and her comforts, and every good thing that is to be wished for. And therefore she calleth for it, as most meet for her to possess; and safest for every wise man to yield unto her. "My son, give me thine heart."


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Bibliography
Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on Proverbs 14:33". Preacher's Complete Homiletical Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/phc/proverbs-14.html. Funk & Wagnalls Company, 1892.

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