corner graphic

Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Proverbs 2:16

 

 

To deliver you from the strange woman, From the adulteress who flatters with her words;

Adam Clarke Commentary

The stranger which flattereth with her words - החליקה hechelikah, she that smooths with her words. The original intimates the glib, oily speeches of a prostitute. The English lick is supposed to be derived from the original word.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Proverbs 2:16". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/proverbs-2.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

The second great evil, the warnings against which are frequent (see the marginal reference). Two words are used to describe the class.

(1) “The strange woman” is one who does not belong to the family, one who by birth is outside the covenant of Israel.

(2) “The stranger” is none other than a foreigner.

It is the word used of the “strange” wives of Solomon 1 Kings 11:1, 1 Kings 11:8, and of those of the Jews who returned from Babylon (Proverbs 2:17; but the old pagan leaven (influence) presently broke out; the sensual worship of other gods led the way to a life of harlotry. The stringent laws of the Mosaic code Leviticus 19:29; Leviticus 21:9; Deuteronomy 23:18 probably deterred the women of Israel from that sin, and led to a higher standard of purity among them than prevailed among other nations.

Most interpreters have, however, generalized the words as speaking of any adulteress. The Septuagint as if reluctant to speak of facts so shameful, has allegorized them, and seen in the temptress the personification of “evil counsel.”


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Proverbs 2:16". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/proverbs-2.html. 1870.

The Biblical Illustrator

Proverbs 2:16

To deliver thee from the strange woman.

Sensual temptation

Gaze not on beauty too much, lest it blast thee; nor too long, lest it blind thee; nor too near lest it burn thee. If thou like it, it deceives thee; if thou love it, it disturbs thee; if thou hunt after it, it destroys thee. If virtue accompany it, it is the heart’s paradise; if vice associate it, it is the fool’s purgatory. It is the wise man’s bonfire, and the fool’s furnace. (Quarles.)

The enticement of women

The deliverance from evil men was described before; now follows the deliverance from evil women, who are as dangerous to the young man, if not more, in regard to their crafty allurements. Men present as enticement unlawful gain; women offer unlawful pleasure.

I. There is a medicine in Scripture for every disease of the soul. Here an antidote against the poison of evil women.

1. There is a fence against several degrees of sin. Against evil thoughts; evil words, evil deeds.

2. There are many remedies for the same sin. Prohibitions, examples, judgments.

II. The danger from evil women is great. Illustrate Samson and Solomon. As good women are modest, so bad women are loud and bold. As good women are tenderly affected, so wicked ones are most cruel. Take heed of being overcome by smooth language. They will tell thee that they love none else, and will die for thee, but they love thy wealth and beauty, and will leave thee when these fail. (Francis Taylor.)

The strange woman

Surely one cannot declare the whole counsel of God and leave out a subject which is interwoven with almost every chapter in the Bible. I am entirely aware of the delicacy of introducing this subject into the pulpit.

1. One difficulty arises from the sensitiveness of unaffected purity.

2. Another difficulty springs from the nature of the English language, which has hardly been framed in a school where it may wind and fit itself to all the phases of impurity.

3. Another difficulty lies in the confused echoes which vile men create in every community, when the pulpit disturbs them.

4. Another difficulty exists in the criminal fastidiousness of the community upon this subject. The proverbs of Solomon are designed to furnish us a series of maxims for every relation of life. There will naturally be the most said where there is the most needed. If the frequency of warning against any sin measures the liability of man to that sin, then none is worse than impurity.

I. Can language be found which can draw a corrupt beauty so vividly as this: “Which forsaketh the guide of her youth, and forgetteth the covenant of her God”? Look out upon that fallen creature whose gay sally through the street calls out the significant laugh of bad men, the pity of good men, and the horror of the pure! Was not her cradle as pure as ever a loved infant pressed? Love soothed its cries, sisters watched its peaceful sleep, and a mother pressed it fondly to her bosom! Had you afterwards, when spring-flowers covered the earth, and every gale was odour, and every sound was music, seen her, fairer than the lily or the violet, searching them, would you not have said, “Sooner shall the rose grow poisonous than she; both may wither, but neither corrupt”? And how often, at evening, did she clasp her tiny hands in prayer! Alas, she forsook the guide of her youth! Faint thoughts of evil, like far-off cloud which the sunset gilds, came first; nor does the rosy sunset blush deeper along the heaven than her cheek at the first thought of evil. Now, O mother, and thou, guiding elder sister, could you have seen the lurking spirit embosomed in that cloud, a holy prayer might have broken the spell, a tear have washed its stain! Alas! they saw it not; she spoke it not; she was forsaking the guide of her youth. She thinketh no more of heaven. She breatheth no more prayers. Thou hast forsaken the covenant of thy God. Go down! fall never to rise! Hell opens to be thy home!

II. The next injunction of God to the young is upon the ensnaring danger of beauty. “Desire not her beauty in thy heart, neither let her take thee with her eyelids.” God did not make so much of nature with exquisite beauty, or put within us a taste for it, without object. He meant that it should delight us. He made every flower to charm us. He never made a colour, nor graceful flying.bird, nor silvery insect, without meaning to please our taste. When He clothes a man or woman with beauty, He confers a favour, did we know how to receive it. Beauty, with amiable dispositions and ripe intelligence, is more to any woman than a queen’s crown. As moths and tiny insects flutter around the bright blaze which was kindled for no harm, so the foolish young fall down burned and destroyed by the blaze of beauty. If God hath given thee beauty, tremble; for it is as gold in thy house: thieves and robbers will prowl around, and seek to possess it. If God hath put beauty before thine eyes, remember how many strong men have been cast down wounded by it. Art thou stronger than David? Let other men’s destruction be thy wisdom; for it is hard to reap prudence upon the field of experience.

III. In the minute description of this dangerous creature, mark next how seriously we are cautioned of her wiles.

1. Her wiles of dress. Coverings of tapestry and the fine linen of Egypt are hers; the perfumes of myrrh, and aloes, and cinnamon. Silks and ribbons, lace and rings, gold and equipage; ah, how mean a price for damnation! The wretch who would be hung simply for the sake of riding to the gallows on a golden chariot, clothed in king’s raiment, what a fool was he!

2. Her wiles of speech. Beasts may not speak; this honour is too high for them. To God’s imaged son this prerogative belongs, to utter thought and feeling in articulate sounds. We may breathe our thoughts to thousand ears, and infect a multitude with the worst portions of our soul. How, then, has this soul’s breath, this echo of our thoughts, this only image of our feelings, been perverted, that from the lips of sin it hath more persuasion than from the lips of wisdom? Purity sounds morose and cross; but from the lips of the harlot words drop as honey, and flow smoother than oil: her speech is fair, her laugh is merry as music. The eternal glory of purity has no lustre; but the deep damnation of lust is made as bright as the gate of heaven!

3. Her wiles of love. Love is the mind’s light and heat; it is that tenuous air in which all other faculties exist as we exist in the atmosphere. A mind of the greatest stature without love is like the huge pyramid of Egypt--chill and cheerless in all its dark halls and passages. A mind with love is as a king’s palace lighted for a royal festival. Shame that the sweetest of all the mind’s attributes should be suborned to sin! Devil-tempter! will thy poison never cease? Shall beauty be poisoned? shall language be charmed? shall love be made to defile like pitch, and burn as the living coals? Trust the sea with thy tiny boat, trust the fickle wind, trust the changing skies of April, trust the miser’s generosity, the tyrant’s mercy; but, ah! simple man, trust not thyself near the artful woman, armed in her beauty, her cunning raiment, her dimpled smiles.

4. Next beware the wile of her reasonings. “To him that wanteth understanding, she saith, Stolen waters are sweet, and bread eaten in secret is pleasant. I came forth to meet thee, and I have found thee.” What says she in the credulous ear of inexperience? Why, she tells him that sin is safe; she swears to him that sin is pure. Out of history she will entice him, and say, “Who hath ever refused my meat-offerings and drink-offerings? What king have I not sought? What conqueror have I not conquered? Philosophers have not, in all their wisdom, learned to hate me. I have been the guests of the world’s greatest men. Art thou afraid to tread where Plato trod, and the pious Socrates? Art thou wiser than all that ever lived? “Nay, she readeth the Bible to him; she goeth back along the line of history, and readeth of Abraham, and of his glorious compeers; she skippeth past Joseph with averted looks, and readeth of David and of Solomon. Or, if the Bible will not cheat thee, how will she plead thine own nature; how will she whisper, “God hath made thee so.” How, like her father, will she lure to pluck the apple, saying, “Thou shalt not surely die.” I will point only to another wile. When inexperience has been beguiled by her infernal machinations, how, like a flock of startled birds, will spring up late regrets, and shame, and fear; and, worst of all, how will conscience ply her scorpion-whip and lash thee, uttering with stern visage, “Thou art dishonoured, thou art a wretch, thou art lost!“ So, God saith, the strange woman shall secure her ensnared victims if they struggle. “Lest thou shouldst ponder the path of life, her ways are moveable that thou canst not know them.” She is afraid to see thee soberly thinking of leaving her, and entering the path of life; therefore her ways are moveable. She multiplies devices, she studies a thousand new wiles, she has some sweet word for every sense--obsequience for thy pride, praise for thy vanity, generosity for thy selfishness, religion For thy conscience.

IV. Having disclosed her wiles, let me show you what God says of the chances of escape to those who once follow her. “None that go unto her return again, neither take they hold of the paths of life.” The strength of this language was not meant absolutely to exclude hope. Some may escape--as here and there a mangled sailor crawls out of the water upon the beach--the only one or two of the whole crew. There are many evils which hold their victims by the force of habit; there are others which fasten them by breaking their return to society. Many a person never reforms, because reform would bring no relief. There are other evils which hold men to them, because they are like the beginning of a fire; they tend to burn with fiercer and wider flames, until all fuel is consumed, and go out only when there is nothing to burn. Of this last kind is the sin of licentiousness; and when the conflagration once breaks out, experience has shown what the Bible long ago declared, that the chances of reformation are few indeed.

V. We are repeatedly warned against the strange woman’s house. Her house has been cunningly planned by an evil architect to attract and please the attention. It stands in a vast garden full of enchanting objects; it shines in glowing colours, and seems full of peace and full of pleasure. All the signs are of unbounded enjoyment--safe, if not innocent. Though every beam is rotten, and the house is the house of death, and in it are all the vicissitudes of infernal misery, yet to the young it appears a palace of delight. They will not believe that death can lurk behind so brilliant a fabric. That part of the garden which borders on the highway of innocence is carefully planted. There is not a poison-weed, nor thorn, nor thistle there. Ten thousand flowers bloom, and waft a thousand odours. A victim cautiously inspects it; but it has been too carefully patterned upon innocency to be easily detected. “Whoso is simple, let him turn in hither.” Will the youth enter? Will he seek her house? To himself he says, “I will enter only to see the garden--its fruits, its flowers, its birds, its arbours, its warbling fountains!“ He is resolved in virtue. He seeks wisdom, not pleasure! Dupe! you are deceived already; and this is your first lesson of wisdom. He passes, and the porter leers behind him! He is within an enchanter’s garden! He ranges the outer garden near to the highway, thinking as he walks, “How foolishly have I been alarmed at pious lies about this beautiful place! I heard it was hell: I find it is paradise!“ Emboldened by the innocency of his first steps, he explores the garden further from the road. The flowers grow richer; their odours exhilarate. Ridiculous priest, to tell me that death was here, where all is beauty, fragrance, and melody! Surely, death never lurked in so gorgeous apparel as this! When our passions enchant us, how beautiful is the way to death! Where are his resolutions now? This is the virtuous youth who came to observe! He has already seen too much! but he will see more; he will taste, feel, regret, weep, wail, die! It is too late! He has gone in--who shall never return. “He goeth after her straightway as an ox goeth to the slaughter; or as a fool to the correction of the stocks . . . and knoweth not that it is for his life.” Enter with me, in imagination, the strange woman’s house, where, God grant, you may never enter in any other way.

There are five wards--Pleasure, Satiety, Discovery, Disease, Death.

1. Ward of Pleasure. The eye is dazzled with the magnificence of its apparel--elastic velvet, glossy silks, burnished satin, crimson drapery, plushy carpets. Exquisite pictures glow upon the wall; carved marble adorns every niche.

2. Ward of Satiety. Overflushed with dance, sated with wine and fruit, a fitful drowsiness vexes them. They wake, to crave; they taste, to loathe; they sleep, to dream; they wake again from unquiet visions. They long for the sharp taste of pleasure, so grateful yesterday. The glowing garden and the banquet now seem all stripped and gloomy.

3. The Ward of Discovery. In the third ward no deception remains. The floors are bare; the naked walls drip filth; the air is poisonous with sickly fumes, and echoes with mirth, concealing hideous misery. None supposes that he has been happy. The past seems like the dream of the miser who gathers gold spilt like rain upon the road, and wakes, clutching his bed, and crying, “Where is it?”

4. Ward of Disease.

5. Ward of Death. No longer does the incarnate wretch pretend to conceal her cruelty. She thrusts, aye, as if they were dirt--she shovels out the wretches. Some fall headlong through the rotten floor--a long fall to a fiery bottom. The floor trembles to deep thunders which roll below. Here and there jets of flame sprout up, and give a lurid light to the murky hall.

Oh, that the young might see the end of vice before they see the beginning!

1. I solemnly warn you against indulging a morbid imagination. In that busy and mischievous faculty begins the evil.

2. Next to evil imaginations, I warn the young of evil companions. Decaying fruit corrupts the neighbouring fruit.

3. But I warn you, with yet more solemn emphasis, against evil books and evil pictures.

4. Once more, let me persuade you that no examples in high places can justify imitation in low places.

5. Let me beseech you, lastly, to guard your heart-purity. Never lose it. If it be gone, you have lost from the casket the most precious gift of God. (H. W. Beecher.)


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "Proverbs 2:16". The Biblical Illustrator. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/proverbs-2.html. 1905-1909. New York.

Coffman's Commentaries on the Bible

GOD'S MAN IS DELIVERED FROM HARLOTRY

"To deliver thee from the strange woman,

Even from the foreigner that flattereth with her words;

That forsaketh the friend of her youth,

And forgetteth the covenant of her God:

For her house inclineth unto death,

And her paths unto the dead;

None that go unto her return again,

Neither do they attain unto the paths of life:"

"To deliver thee from the strange woman" (Proverbs 2:16). Who is this strange woman? According to Cook, "She is none other than a foreigner";[17] but the mention of her having forgotten "the covenant of her God," identifies her as an Israelite who had been in covenant relationship with the Lord. Others have identified her as a religious prostitute attached to some pagan shrine; but the simple truth appears to be that. "The strange woman here is any meretricious person who indulges in illicit sex."[18]

(This is the first of several warnings against adultery in the book of Proverbs; others are in Proverbs 5:3-23; 6:20-35; 7:1-27; 9:13-18). The thing that amazes this writer is that the author of these instructions was himself the most fantastic violator of these warnings ever known.

"Some Jewish commentators personify the strange woman here and make her a symbol of some form of foreign philosophy; but, very probably, the reference is to literal vice."[19]

The use of the word "stranger" (or strange woman) in Proverbs is not to be understood in its ordinary meaning. Ruth called herself a stranger (Ruth 2:10); but, "In Proverbs, these words are euphemisms for harlot."[20]

"That forsaketh the friend of her youth" (Proverbs 2:17). Most scholars agree that these words refer to the woman's husband.[21]

"Her house inclineth unto death" (Proverbs 2:18). "Men come away from every unlawful indulgence other than they go - weaker and worse in soul. Alas for the morrow of incontinence, of whatever kind it is! The soul is injured; self-respect is slain; his force is diminished; he is on the incline that slopes to death; and one step nearer to it than ever before. `Her house inclineth unto death'!"[22]

"Adultery is a house slanted toward the death of the spirit; and Divine wisdom is essential for deliverance from its temptation and torment."[23]


Copyright Statement
James Burton Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.

Bibliography
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Proverbs 2:16". "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/proverbs-2.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

To deliver thee from the strange woman,.... As the Gospel of Christ and its doctrines, or the instructions of wisdom, are a means of delivering persons from the evil man, his company, ways, and works; so from a naughty woman, an adulteress, called a "strange" woman; not because of another nation, or unknown, but because she belongs to another person, and not to him whom she entices into her embraces. Gersom interprets this of the sensitive appetite, and Jarchi of idolatry; as others do also of superstition and all false doctrine, and everything that is contrary to true wisdom; and the whole that is here and afterwards said may well enough be applied to the whore of Rome, from whose fornication, or spiritual adultery, that is, idolatry, will worship, and antichristian doctrines, the Gospel delivers men; see Proverbs 7:5, &c.

even from the stranger which flattereth with her words; that useth smooth and soft words to work upon the passions, move the affections, and win the hearts of men; and ensnare them and draw them to commit wickedness with her; see Proverbs 5:3; and so antichrist, and all false teachers and heretics, with good words and fair speeches deceive the hearts of the simple, Romans 16:18.


Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Proverbs 2:16". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/proverbs-2.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

To deliver thee from the strange i woman, [even] from the stranger [which] flattereth with her words;

(i) Meaning, the wisdom which is the word of God, will preserve us from all vices: naming this vice of whoredom to which man is most prone.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Proverbs 2:16". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/proverbs-2.html. 1599-1645.

Keil & Delitzsch Commentary on the Old Testament

With the resumption of להצּילך , the watchful protection which wisdom affords to its possessors is further specified in these verses:

16 To save thee from the strange woman,

From the stranger who useth smooth words;

The subject here continued is the fourfold wisdom named in Proverbs 2:10, Proverbs 2:11. זר signifies alienus , which may also be equivalent to alius populi , but of a much wider compass - him who does not belong to a certain class ( e.g. , the non-priestly or the laity), the person or thing not belonging to me, or also some other than I designate; on the other hand, נכרי , peregrinus , scarcely anywhere divests itself of the essential mark of a strange foreign origin. While thus אשּׁה זרה is the non-married wife, נכריּה designates her as non-Israelitish. Prostitution was partly sanctioned in the cultus of the Midianites, Syrians, and other nations neighbouring to Israel, and thus was regarded as nothing less than customary. In Israel, on the contrary, the law (Deuteronomy 23:18.) forbade it under a penalty, and therefore it was chiefly practised by foreign women (Proverbs 23:27, and cf. the exception, Ruth 2:10),

(Note: In Talmudic Heb. ארמית (Aramean) has this meaning for the Biblical נכריּה .)

an inveterate vice, which spread itself particularly from the latter days of Solomon, along with general ungodliness, and excusing itself under the polygamy sanctioned by the law, brought ruin on the state. The Chokma contends against this, and throughout presents monogamy as alone corresponding to the institution and the idea of the relation. Designating marriage as the “covenant of God,” it condemns not only adulterous but generally promiscuous intercourse of the sexes, because unhallowed and thus unjustifiable, and likewise arbitrary divorce. Regarding the ancient ceremonies connected with the celebration of marriage we are not specially informed; but from Proverbs 2:17, Malachi 2:14 (Ewald, Bertheau, Hitzig, but not Köhler), it appears that the celebration of marriage was a religious act, and that they who were joined together in marriage called God to witness and ratify the vows they took upon themselves. The perf. in the attributive clause אמריה החליקה proceeds on the routine acquired in cajoling and dissembling: who has smoothed her words, i.e. , learned to entice by flattering words (Fl.).


Copyright Statement
The Keil & Delitzsch Commentary on the Old Testament is a derivative of a public domain electronic edition.

Bibliography
Keil, Carl Friedrich & Delitzsch, Franz. "Commentary on Proverbs 2:16". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/kdo/proverbs-2.html. 1854-1889.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

To deliver thee from the strange woman, even from the stranger which flattereth with her words;

Strange woman — From the adulteress or whore.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Proverbs 2:16". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/proverbs-2.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Proverbs 2:16 To deliver thee from the strange woman, [even] from the stranger [which] flattereth with her words;

Ver. 16. From the strange woman.] Forbidden thee by God, as strange fire, strange gods, &c.

Which flattereth with her words.] Whose lips are nets, whose hands are bands, whose words are cords to draw a man in as a fool to the stocks, or an ox to the slaughter.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Proverbs 2:16". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/proverbs-2.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Proverbs 2:16. To deliver thee from the strange woman The strange woman means one who is not yours, whether she be married or not. Solomon expresses by this name a common woman, or a married woman who abandons herself to debauchery. See chap. Proverbs 5:3, &c. Some have thought that, under the figure of an adulterous woman, the wise man persuades us to shun all those doctrines which draw away the mind from God: such as those of the Epicureans and idolaters. But this seems to be intimated before in the 12th verse; and therefore we may understand the present passage literally as a caution against the breach of the next commandment to that mentioned in the first chap. Proverbs 2:10-11 where he charges his son by no means to consent with murderers; and here, to shun fornication and adultery, which entirely alienate the mind from wisdom. One of the first things, therefore, to which she directs us, and the principal benefit that we receive from her, is, to preserve our understandings from being corrupt, by keeping our bodies pure and undefiled: See Bishop Patrick and Calmet.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Proverbs 2:16". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/proverbs-2.html. 1801-1803.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

From the strange woman; from the adulteress or whore; called strange, partly because such persons were commonly heathens, or are supposed to be such by reason of that severe law against these practices in Israelitish women, Deuteronomy 23:17, or are justly reputed heathens, as being degenerate Israelites, which are oft called strangers, as hath been noted in the Book of the Psalms; and partly because conversation with such persons is forbidden to men; as those Israelites which were not Levites are called strangers, Numbers 1:51, in respect of the holy things which they were prohibited to touch; and forbidden fire is called strange fire, Numbers 3:4.

Which flattereth with her words; which useth all arts and ways to allure men to unchaste actions; one kind being put for all the rest.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Proverbs 2:16". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/proverbs-2.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

16. From the strange woman — Solomon here proceeds to show that this wisdom of which he speaks will also preserve from the snares of the dissolute woman. Such a woman is described. She is זרה, (zarah,) and נכריה, (nokhriyyah,) a strange woman, an adulteress; that is, a foreigner either as to nation or to the household; another woman than the man’s wife. It is probable that those women who surrendered themselves to licentious practices among the Hebrews were mostly foreigners, and hence the words corresponding to our words harlot, prostitute, and the term stranger or foreign woman, came to be nearly synonymous. By the Canaanites, especially the Phoenicians, women were consecrated to prostitution as priestesses of their impure goddess of love. In periods of her corruption Israel received these foreign women, and temples of licentious rites, scattered through Palestine, reduced the young Israelites to debauchery.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Proverbs 2:16". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/proverbs-2.html. 1874-1909.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Strange. Idolatress, (Grotius) or rather the abandoned woman, whether married or not. (Calmet) --- This description, as well as the former, guards us against heretics, who leave the right way of the Catholic Church, (ver. 13.) and devise perverse doctrines of rebellion against princes, &c., as if faith alone were sufficient. By this faith, Protestants do not mean any article which all must believe, but only that each one must be convinced that he himself is just, and will be saved. Like the strange woman, they preach a comfortable doctrine, and use sweet speeches, Romans xvi. 18. Their conversion is a very difficult matter, (ver. 19.) because they are condemned by their own judgment, (Titus iii. 11.) and will not admit of the ordinary means of instruction in the Church. (Worthington)


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Proverbs 2:16". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/proverbs-2.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

strange woman. Hebrew. zur = apostate to a false religion, of which prostitution formed part.

stranger = foreigner. Hebrew. nakar = foreign woman. Not of Abraham"s seed (Genesis 17:12): ever a snare to Israel.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Proverbs 2:16". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/proverbs-2.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

To deliver thee from the strange woman, even from the stranger which flattereth with her words;

To deliver thee from the strange woman, even from the stranger which flattereth with her words - (like Proverbs 2:12, which has the same formula.) "To deliver thee:" this verse depends on Proverbs 2:11, "Discretion ... understanding shall keep thee," so as "to deliver thee from the strange woman." Twice Solomon uses a similar expression, "the strange woman, (even) the stranger," to impress more forcibly on the young man the fact that her person belongs to another, and so to deter him from connection with her (cf. Proverbs 2:17; Proverbs 5:20). The literal and the spiritual adulteress and temptress are both meant. The spiritual gives to the world her person and her heart, which belong by right to God. In this sense the foreign women who subsequently drew aside Solomon himself, were "strange women," not so much in respect to their local distance from Israel, as in respect to their being utterly alien to the worship of God. Lust and idolatry were the spiritual adultery into which they entrapped the once wise king. How striking that he should utter beforehand a warning which he afterward himself disregarded! (Nehemiah 13:26, "Did not Solomon king of Israel sin by these things? yet among many nations was there no king like him, who was beloved of his God, and God made him king over all Israel: nevertheless even him did outlandish women cause to sin;" 1 Kings 11:1-4.)


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Proverbs 2:16". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/proverbs-2.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(16) To deliver thee from the strange woman.—Another work of wisdom, to save from profligacy. Of the two epithets here used, “strange” (zârah) and “stranger” (nokhrîyyah), the first implies that she belonged to another family, the second to another nation. It would seem as if the evil example of Solomon (1 Kings 11:1), in marrying foreign women, had become common in Israel, and that they, by their vicious lives, had become a deadly source of corruption. Brought up in the lax views of morality which prevailed among heathen nations at this time, they would not consider themselves bound by the high standard of purity which was enjoined upon Hebrew women by the Law.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Proverbs 2:16". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/proverbs-2.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

To deliver thee from the strange woman, even from the stranger which flattereth with her words;
deliver
5:3-20; 6:24; 7:5-23; 22:14; 23:27; Genesis 39:3-12; Nehemiah 13:26,27; Ecclesiastes 7:26
flattereth
7:21; 29:5

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Proverbs 2:16". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/proverbs-2.html.

To report dead links, typos, or html errors or suggestions about making these resources more useful use our convenient contact form
Powered by Lightspeed Technology