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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Proverbs 26:28

 

 

A lying tongue hates those it crushes, And a flattering mouth works ruin.

Adam Clarke Commentary

A lying tongue hateth those that are afflicted by it - He that injures another hates him in proportion to the injury he has done him; and, strange to tell, in proportion to the innocence of the oppressed. The debtor cannot bear the sight of his creditor; nor the knave, of him whom he has injured.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Proverbs 26:28". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/proverbs-26.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

The lying tongue hates its victims.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Proverbs 26:28". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/proverbs-26.html. 1870.

The Biblical Illustrator

Proverbs 26:28

A flattering mouth worketh ruin.

How may we best cure the love of being flattered

I. What flattery is. Solomon calls it “a mouth that flatters.” All that comes from the flatterer is complaisant, only heartiness and sincerity are wanting. All that appears is “a fair semblance,” but very falsehood. The actor in this tragedy never forgets himself and his own advantage, stripping the novice he hath coaxed, and living on him whom he deceived. There are two kinds of flattery: a self-flattery, and a flattery from others. As to the qualities of flattery, it may be hellish, revengeful, servile, cowardly, covetous, or envious. Love to be flattered is a disease of human nature. It is an immoderate desire of praise. When this desire prevails, we believe what the flatterer saith; set the value on ourselves by what such affirm of us. Another branch of love to be flattered is an affected seeking to ourselves, or giving unto others unnecessary occasions of setting forth the worth of our persons, actions, and qualifications, according to the standard of flatterers; a well-pleasedness to hear the great and good things by dissembling flatterers ascribed to us which either we never did, or did in manner much below what they report them. But--

II. Love of undue praise is pernicious. It destroys virtuous principles, natural inclinations to good, estates, reputation, safety and life, the soul and its happiness.

III. What may best effect its cure?

1. Consider the bad name that flattery hath ever had.

2. View the deplorable miseries it hath filled the world with.

3. Suspect all who come to you with undue praise.

4. Reject the friendship of the man who turns due praises into flattery.

5. Look on flattery, and your love for it, as diametrically opposed to God in the truth of all His Word.

6. Cultivate generous and pure love to all that is good.

7. Get and keep the humble frame of heart. Undue love of the praise of men is sacrilegious robbery of God. (Henry Hurst, M. A.)

The flatterer

As to the flatterer, he is the most dangerous of characters. He attacks at points where men are naturally most successfully assailable; where they are most in danger of being thrown off their guard and giving him admission. And when by his flatteries he has thus got the mastery, then follows the execution of the end for which they were employed--“worketh ruin.” The expression is strong, but not stronger than experience justifies. It even works ruin to the most interesting characters--characters admired and worthy of the admiration--by infusing a principle that spoils the whole, the principle of vanity and self-conceit. They thus lose their loveliest and most engaging attraction. And whatever be the selfish object of the flatterer, his selfishness obtains its gratification by the ruin of him whom his flatteries have deceived. (R. Wardlaw, D. D.)

Flattery worketh ruin

The stem of the ivy is furnished with root-like suckers which insinuate their spurs into the bark of trees or on the surface of a wall. Who has not seen with regret some noble ash-tree covered with ivy, in whose embrace it rapidly yields up its life? Surely the root is draining the tree of its sap, and transferring it to its own veins. Thus does a sycophant gradually extend his influence over a patron until the manliness of that patron succumbs to his ascendancy. The hero is ruined, and the flatterer flourishes in his place. Beware of the insinuating aptitudes of the parasite! Let him, like ivy on a wall, keep his proper situation. Protect a noble nature from his advances. (Scientific Illustrations.)

Flattery cannot compensate for the damage it works

Parasitic plants send their roots into the substance of another plant, and derive their food from its juices; but though, like some of the human kind, they live upon their neighbour’s bounty, it must be admitted that they sometimes reward their benefactor by adorning it with their beautiful flowers. The Rafflesia Arnoldi, for example, whose flower is three feet across, and whose cup will contain several pints of fluid, grows attached to the stem of a climbing cistus in Sumatra. The mistletoe also, whose silvery berries adorn the oak. Whether these offerings of the parasite bear any reasonable proportion to the amount of damage done by it must be a question open to doubt. Certain it is that the offerings of the social parasite to his benefactor, consisting as they do of subservience, flattery, and petty traits, are no real benefit to anybody; whilst, on the other hand, the injury which the parasite does to honesty and manliness is most unmistakable. On the whole, we are inclined to think that all the productions of parasites, whether vegetable or human, are not sufficient to make us value the producers very highly. (Scientific Illustrations.)
.


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Bibliography
Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "Proverbs 26:28". The Biblical Illustrator. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/proverbs-26.html. 1905-1909. New York.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

A lying tongue hateth those that are afflicted by it,.... That is, a man of a lying tongue, that is given to lying, hates those that are hurt and crushed by his lies; the reason why he hurts them with his lies is because he hates them; and, having hurt them, he hates them, being made his enemies, and from whom he may expect and be in fear of revenge: moreover, he hates those that are troubled at and disturbed with his lies; or the "contrite"F16דכיו "contritos suos", Montanus, Michaelis. and humble men: or those who "smite" or "strike"F17"Percutientes", Gejerus. him, as some render the word, actively; that is, reprove him, and bring him to shame for lying. The words are by some translated, a "contrite" person, or everyone of "the contrite ones, hateth a lying tongue"F18"Linguam falsitatis odit quisque contritorum ejus", Cocceius Lexic. Colossians 158. "quisque contritorum ab ea", ibid. version. ; such as are of a broken and of a contrite spirit, and that tremble at the word of God, or are hurt by lies, these abhor a liar. The Targum is,

"a lying tongue bates the ways of truth;'

and the Septuagint, Syriac, and Arabic versions, render it, "a lying tongue hate truth"; and so the Vulgate Latin version, "a lying tongue loves not truth"; for nothing is more contrary to a lie than truth;

and a flattering mouth worketh ruin; both to itself and to the persons flattered by it: or, "makes an impulse"F19מדחה "expulsionem", Pagninus, Montanus; "impulsum sive lapsum", Vatablus; "impulsionem", Tigurine version, Mercerus, Junius & Tremellius, Piscator, Gejerus, Michaelis, Schultens. ; a pushing, a driving away; it drives away such as cannot bear its flatteries: and pushes on such that are taken with it, both into sin and into ruin.


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Proverbs 26:28". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/proverbs-26.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Men hate those they injure.

A lying tongue — “lips” for the persons (compare Proverbs 4:24; Psalm 12:3).


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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Proverbs 26:28". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/proverbs-26.html. 1871-8.

Keil & Delitzsch Commentary on the Old Testament

28 The lying tongue hateth those whom it bruiseth;

And a flattering mouth causeth ruin.

The lxx, Jerome, the Targ., and Syr. render ישׂנא דכיו in the sense of non amat veritatem ; they appear by דכיו to have thought of the Aram. דכיא , that which is pure; and thus they gain nothing else but an undeniable plain thought. Many Jewish interpreters gloss: מוכיחיו , also after the Aram.: דּכּיו = מדכּיו ; but the Aram. דּכּי does not mean pure in the sense of being right, therefore Elia Wilna understands him who desires to justify himself, and this violent derivation from the Aram. thus does not lead to the end. Luther, translating: “a false tongue hates those who punish it,” explains, as also Gesenius, conterentes = castigantes ipsam ; but דּך signifies, according to the usage of the language before us, “bruised” ( vid ., Psalms 9:10), not: bruising; and the thought that the liar hates him who listens to him, leads ad absurdum ; but that he does not love him who bruises (punishes) him, is self-evident. Kimchi sees in דּכּיו another form of דּכּא ; and Meîri, Jona Gerundi in his ethical work ( שׁערי תשׁובה = The gates of Repentance), and others, accordingly render דכיו in the sense of ענו ( עניו ): the lying tongue hates - as Löwenstein translates - the humble [pious]; also that for דכּיו , by the omission of ו , דכּי = זכּי may be read, is supposable; but this does not harmonize with the second half of the proverb, according to which לשׁון שׁקר must be the subject, and ישׂנא דכיו must express some kind of evil which proceeds from such a tongue. Ewald: “the lying tongue hates its master ( אדניו ),” but that is not in accordance with the Heb. style; the word in that case should have been בּעליו . Hitzig countenances this אדניו , with the remark that the tongue is here personified; but personified, the tongue certainly means him who has it (Psalms 120:3). Böttcher's conjecture ישׁנּא דכיו , “confounds their talk,” is certainly a curiosity. Spoken of the sea, those words would mean, “it changes its surge.” But is it then at all necessary to uncover first the meaning of 28a? Rashi, Arama, and others refer דכּיו to דּכּים = נדכּאים ( מדכּים ). Thus also perhaps the Venet ., which translates τοὺς ἐπιτριμμοὺς (not: ἐπιτετριμμένους ) αὐτῆς . C. B. Michaelis: Lingua falsitatis odio habet contritos suos, h. e. eos quos falsitate ac mendacio laedit contritosque facit . Hitzig objects that it is more correct to say: conterit perosos sibi . And certainly this lay nearer, on which account Fleischer remarks: in 28a there is to be supposed a poetic transposition of the ideas (Hypallage): homo qui lingua ad calumnias abutitur conterit eos quos odit . The poet makes ישׂנא the main conception, because it does not come to him so readily to say that the lying tongue bruises those against whom it is directed, as that it is hatred, which is active in this. To say this was by no means superfluous. There are men who find pleasure in repeating and magnifying scandalously that which is depreciatory and disadvantageous to their neighbour unsubstantiated, without being at all conscious of any particular ill-will or personal enmity against him; but this proverb says that such untruthful tongue-thrashing proceeds always from a transgression of the commandment, “Thou shalt not hate thy brother,” Leviticus 19:17, and not merely from the want of love, but from a state of mind which is the direct opposite of love ( vid ., Proverbs 10:18). Ewald finds it incongruous that 28a speaks of that which others have to suffer from the lying tongue, whereas the whole connection of this proverb requires that the tongue should here be regarded as bringing ruin upon its owner himself. But of the destruction which the wicked tongue prepares for others many proverbs also speak, e.g. , Proverbs 12:13, cf. Proverbs 17:4, לשׁון הוּת ; and 28b does not mention that the smooth tongue (written וּפה־חלק with Makkeph ) brings injury upon itself (an idea which must be otherwise expressed; cf. Proverbs 14:32), but that it brings injury and ruin on those who have pleasure in its flatteries ( חלקות , Psalms 12:3; Isaiah 30:10), and are befooled thereby: os blandiloquum ( blanditiis dolum tegens ) ad casum impellit, sc. alios (Fleischer).


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The Keil & Delitzsch Commentary on the Old Testament is a derivative of a public domain electronic edition.

Bibliography
Keil, Carl Friedrich & Delitzsch, Franz. "Commentary on Proverbs 26:28". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/kdo/proverbs-26.html. 1854-1889.

Matthew Henry's Complete Commentary on the Bible

There are two sorts of lies equally detestable: - 1. A slandering lie, which avowedly hates those it is spoken of: A lying tongue hates those that are afflicted by it; it afflicts them by calumnies and reproaches because it hates them, and can thus smite them secretly where they are without defence; and it hates them because it has afflicted them and made them its enemies. The mischief of this is open and obvious; it afflicts, it hates, and owns it, and every body sees it. 2. A flattering lie, which secretly works the ruin of those it is spoken to. In the former the mischief is plain, and men guard against it as well as they can, but in this it is little suspected, and men betray themselves by being credulous of their own praises and the compliments that are passed upon them. A wise man therefore will be more afraid of a flatterer that kisses and kills than of a slanderer that proclaims war.


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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Henry, Matthew. "Complete Commentary on Proverbs 26:28". "Matthew Henry Complete Commentary on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mhm/proverbs-26.html. 1706.

Matthew Henry's Concise Commentary on the Bible

There are two sorts of lies equally detestable. A slandering lie, the mischief of this every body sees. A flattering lie, which secretly works ruin. A wise man will be more afraid of a flatterer than of a slanderer.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Henry, Matthew. "Concise Commentary on Proverbs 26:28". "Matthew Henry Concise Commentary

on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mhn/proverbs-26.html. 1706.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Proverbs 26:28 A lying tongue hateth [those that are] afflicted by it; and a flattering mouth worketh ruin.

Ver. 28. A lying tongue hateth those that are addicted by it.] False love proves to be true hatred, by the evil consequent of its ruin and destruction to the party flattered, and betrayed by a smooth supparasitation. There are those who thus read the text. The false tongue hateth those that smite it, &c. Truth breeds hatred, as the fair nymphs did the ill-favoured fauns and satyrs.


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Proverbs 26:28". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/proverbs-26.html. 1865-1868.

Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary

REFLECTIONS.

If the Reader discovers Jesus in the midst of these verses, he will find what the wise man hath elsewhere observed, and with truth is found to be the case, that his name is as ointment poured forth. The discovery of his Person, and the apprehension of his character, relations, and offices, by faith, hath a blessed effect to endear the scriptures to our hearts. And indeed without this discovery, what can we be said to learn in a way of salvation. And Reader! whether we discover him or not, depend upon it here Jesus is. Christ is in all, and through all, and with all. He fills the whole in the church, the word, the promises, and the hearts of his people. Lord! open mine eyes to see the wonderous things of thy law. Open mine heart to feel the full influences of thy grace. Be thou the sum and substance of all my pursuits and desires: and be thou formed in my heart the hope of glory.


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Bibliography
Hawker, Robert, D.D. "Commentary on Proverbs 26:28". "Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/pmc/proverbs-26.html. 1828.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Proverbs 26:28. A lying tongue hateth, &c.— A deceitful tongue shall suffer its own example, a deceitful mouth shall fall into ruin. Houbigant. Our translation, however, may be justified; and the meaning is, that it is common for men to hate those to whom they have done ill turns: Proprium humani ingenii est, odisse quem laeseris, says Tacitus; and this aversion is always strong in proportion to the greatness and injustice of the wrong which has been done. See Calmet.


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Bibliography
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Proverbs 26:28". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/proverbs-26.html. 1801-1803.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Hateth those that are afflicted by it, because by his calumnies he hath made them his enemies.

A flattering mouth; which, though it be more smooth and plausible than a slandering mouth, yet is in truth no less pernicious, betraying others either to sin, or to danger and mischief.


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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Proverbs 26:28". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/proverbs-26.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

28. A lying tongue… and a flattering mouth — These terms, according to Hebrew usage, stand for persons with these qualities. The rendering of the first clause is not entirely satisfactory. We prefer, as more coherent with the latter member, to follow Bate: “The lying tongue shall hate (repent) its bruisings, (calumnies;) for the flattering mouth shall work its own destruction.” The proverb may be regarded as complementary to the preceding one, and as a suitable finale to the whole subject of lying, flattery, and deception presented in Proverbs 26:23-28. Nevertheless, it is fair to say that the larger number of critics substantially accord with our Authorized Version, and take the first clause as corresponding with the saying of Tacitus: “It is natural to man to hate one whom he has injured.”


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Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Proverbs 26:28". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/proverbs-26.html. 1874-1909.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

Proverbs 26:28. A lying tongue hateth, &c. — That is, he who slanders others hates those whom he slanders, because, by his calumnies, he hath made them his enemies. For “it is common for men to hate those to whom they have done evil: thus Tacitus, Proprium humani ingenii est, odisse quem læseris, ‘It is natural to man to hate one whom he hath injured;’ and this aversion is always strong in proportion to the greatness and injustice of the wrong which has been done.” See Calmet. And a flattering mouth worketh ruin — Though it be more smooth and plausible than a slandering mouth, yet it is, in truth, no less pernicious, betraying others either to sin, or to danger and calamity.


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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on Proverbs 26:28". Joseph Benson's Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/proverbs-26.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

CHAPTER XXVI.


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Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Proverbs 26:28". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/proverbs-26.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

hateth, &c. : i.e.: "Forgiveness to the injured doth belong; They ne"er pardon who have done the wrong. "


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Proverbs 26:28". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/proverbs-26.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

A lying tongue hateth those that are afflicted by it; and a flattering mouth worketh ruin.

A lying tongue hateth (those that are) afflicted by it.

`Forgiveness to the injured doth belong; He never pardons that hath done the wrong.'

So Amnon's hatred to Tamar after he had ruined her (2 Samuel 13:5-15).

And a flattering mouth worketh ruin (Psalms 5:9; Psalms 10:7-10). Satan's flattering lie, "Ye shall be as god's," worked ruin to mankind at the first. So it has been ever since (Genesis 3:5; Proverbs 2:16; Proverbs 5:3; Proverbs 7:5; Proverbs 7:21).


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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Proverbs 26:28". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/proverbs-26.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(28) A lying tongue hateth those that are afflicted by it.—As the remembrance of them calls up his own wickedness to the mind of the offender. This is one reason why “the carnal mind is enmity against God” (Romans 8:7), as being conscious of having rejected God’s love, and so hating to be reminded of Him.


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Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Proverbs 26:28". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/proverbs-26.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

A lying tongue hateth those that are afflicted by it; and a flattering mouth worketh ruin.
lying
He that injures another hates him in proportion to the injury; Proprium humani ingenii est, odisse quem læseris, says Tacitlus: and strange to say, in proportion to the innocence of the injured.
John 8:40,44-49; 10:32,33; 15:22-24
a flattering
6:24; 7:5,21-23; 29:5; Luke 20:20,21

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Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Proverbs 26:28". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/proverbs-26.html.

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