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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Psalms 105:16

 

 

And He called for a famine upon the land; He broke the whole staff of bread.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Moreover, he called for a famine upon the land - It was not by chance; not by the mere operation of physical laws, but it was because God “ordered” it. The famine here referred to, as the connection shows, was that which occurred in the time of Jacob, and which was the occasion of the migration into Egypt. There was also a famine in the time of Abraham Genesis 12:10; but the design of the psalmist here is to refer to that period of the Jewish history which pertained to their residence in Egypt, and to the dealings of God with the nation when there, as furnishing an occasion for gratitude. Isaiah 3:1.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Psalms 105:16". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/psalms-105.html. 1870.

Coffman's Commentaries on the Bible

"And he called for a famine upon the land;

He brake the whole staff of bread.

He sent a man before them;

Joseph was sold for a servant:

His feet they hurt with fetters:

He was laid in chains of iron,

Until the time his word came to pass,

The word of Jehovah tried him."

"He called for a famine" (Psalms 105:16). God's plan was to send all of Israel into Egyptian slavery, as he had prophesied through Abraham (Genesis 15); and the famine fitted into that purpose.

"He sent a man before them" (Psalms 105:17). The sale of Joseph by his brothers, somewhat earlier than the famine, was also part of God's plan, another instance of, "the wrath of man praising God."

"Feet hurt with fetters" (Psalms 105:18). This is a detail not found in Genesis; but the truth of it cannot be doubted.

"He was laid in chains of iron" (Psalms 105:18). An alternative reading is, "The iron entered into his soul." The RSV renders this, "His neck was put in a collar of iron."

"The word of Jehovah tried him" (Psalms 105:19). Dean Johnson believed that the implied promise to Joseph of preeminence above his brothers in those dreams which led to their hatred of him (Genesis 37) seemed utterly impossible of fulfilment during Joseph's imprisonment; and that, "This bitter contrast with what Joseph had expected is what tried or tested Joseph."[9] The opinion of this writer is that it was the temptation from the wife of Potiphar which was at least one of the ways in which the word of Jehovah tried him. It might have been both and also have included other tests.


Copyright Statement
James Burton Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.

Bibliography
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Psalms 105:16". "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/psalms-105.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Moreover, he called for a famine upon the land,.... On the land of Egypt; or rather on the land of Canaan, where Jacob and his sons sojourned; and which reached to all lands, Genesis 41:56 and calling for it, it came, being a servant at the command of the Lord; see 2 Kings 8:1.

He brake the whole staff of bread; so called, because it is the support of man's life, the principal of his sustenance: as a staff is a support to a feeble person, and which, when broke, ceases to be so. The staff of bread is broken, when either the virtue and efficacy of it for nourishment is taken away or denied; or when there is a scarcity of bread corn; which latter seems to be intended here; see Isaiah 3:1.


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Psalms 105:16". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/psalms-105.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

Moreover he called for a famine upon the land: he brake the whole k staff of bread.

(k) Either by sending scarcity or the strength and nourishment of it.

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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Psalms 105:16". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/psalms-105.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

God ordered the famine. God

called for a famine — as if it were a servant, ready to come at God‘s bidding. Compare the centurion‘s words, as to disease being God‘s servant (Matthew 8:8, Matthew 8:9).

upon the land — namely, Canaan (Genesis 41:54).

staff of bread — what supports life (Leviticus 26:26; Psalm 104:15; Isaiah 3:1).


Copyright Statement
These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Psalms 105:16". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/psalms-105.html. 1871-8.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Moreover he called for a famine upon the land: he brake the whole staff of bread.

Staff of bread — Bread, which is the staff or support of our lives.


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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Psalms 105:16". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/psalms-105.html. 1765.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

16.And he called a famine upon the land Here the inspired writer recounts a most illustrious proof of divine providence towards the chosen people, at the time when the covenant might seem to be void and disannulled. The inheritance of the land of Canaan (as has been stated above) was added, as an earnest or pledge for confirmation. The descent of Jacob into Egypt, which deprived his house of the sight of the land, could not make the covenant to perish. In this the constancy of God shone forth the brighter; yea, by this trial he manifested more plainly how provident a father he was in preserving the seed of Abraham. But it is better to consider each particular in the verse. In the first place, it is taught, that the famine which drove Jacob into Egypt did not happen by chance. Although only one particular famine is here treated of, it is to be held as a general principle, that there is no other cause of any scarcity of sustenance except this, that God, in withdrawing his hand, takes away the means of support. The curse of God is expressed more emphatically, when it is said, that the famine was called; as if it were ready at his command, as a minister of his wrath. By this we are instructed, that famine, pestilence, and other scourges of God, do not visit men by chance, but are directed by his hand whither it pleases him, and are obedient to his will. (211) The manner in which the famine was called is next stated, namely, when he brake the staff of bread The metaphor of staff is very appropriate; for God has put into bread the power and property of strengthening man, by a secret virtue which fits it to sustain us. So long as it pleases him to nourish us by such means, a staff as it were lies hidden within it. This staff is broken in two ways; either, first, when he takes away the supply of grain necessary for our nourishment, the sense in which it seems to be used in Ezekiel

“Moreover, he said unto me, Son of man, behold, I will break the staff of bread in Jerusalem, and they shall eat bread by weight, and with care; and they shall drink water by measure, and with astonishment;” Ezekiel 4:16

or, secondly, when he breathes in anger upon the bread itself, so that those who would satisfy themselves by devouring it, instead of having their hunger thereby removed, remain famished still. And certainly to the barrenness of the earth this second is commonly added, namely, that he takes away the sustaining power which is in bread; for, as it is declared in Deuteronomy 8:3, bread does not give life of itself, but borrows its secret virtue from the mouth of God.


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These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Psalms 105:16". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/psalms-105.html. 1840-57.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Psalms 105:16 Moreover he called for a famine upon the land: he brake the whole staff of bread.

Ver. 16. Moreover he called for a famine] How easy is it with God soon to starve us all by denying us a harvest or two! If he do but call for a famine it is done.

He brake the whole staff of bread] Either by withdrawing bread, that staff of man’s life, or his blessing from it; for man liveth not by bread alone (or at all), but by every word, &c., Matthew 4:4, without which bread can no more nourish us than a clod of clay, In pane conclusus est quasi baculus, qui nos sustineat. See Haggai 1:6. {See Trapp on "Haggai 1:6"}


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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Psalms 105:16". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/psalms-105.html. 1865-1868.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

He called for, i.e. he effectually procured, as this word is used, 2 Kings 8:1 Isaiah 47:1,5 56:7 Romans 4:17.

The whole staff of bread, i.e. bread, which is the staff or support of our animal lives. See Leviticus 26:26 Psalms 104:15 Ezekiel 4:16.


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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Psalms 105:16". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/psalms-105.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

16. Famine—Recorded Genesis 41:54-57.

Staff of bread—That is, support of bread, their reliance for sustentation. This famine extended over Arabia, Palestine, Syria, and the surrounding nations.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Psalms 105:16". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/psalms-105.html. 1874-1909.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Holy one. By his function (Worthington) of priest. Core wished to take his place, as the rest did to supplant Moses in the civil government, Numbers xvi. (Calmet)


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Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Psalms 105:16". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/psalms-105.html. 1859.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(16) Called for a famine.—Comp. 2 Kings 8:1; and in Ezekiel 14 we see how famine, with war and pestilence and noisome beasts, were regarded as Divine emissaries to be summoned and sent on His missions.

Staff of bread.—Leviticus 26:26. (See, too, Note on Psalms 104:15.)


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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Psalms 105:16". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/psalms-105.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Moreover he called for a famine upon the land: he brake the whole staff of bread.
Moreover
Genesis 41:25-32,54; 42:5,6; 2 Kings 8:1; Amos 3:6; 7:1-4; Haggai 1:10,11; 2:17; Matthew 8:8,9; Revelation 6:8
brake
104:15; Genesis 47:13,19; Leviticus 26:26; Isaiah 3:1; Ezekiel 4:16; Acts 7:11

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Psalms 105:16". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/psalms-105.html.

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