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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Psalms 105:18

 

 

They afflicted his feet with fetters, He himself was laid in irons;

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Whose feet they hurt with fetters - In Genesis 40:3; it is said of Joseph that he was “bound” in prison. It is not improbable that his “feet” were bound, as this is the usual way of confining prisoners.

He was laid in iron - In the prison. The margin is, “his soul came into iron.” The version in the Prayer-Book of the Episcopal Church is, the iron entered into his soul. This is a more striking and beautiful rendering, though it may be doubted whether the Hebrew will permit it. DeWette renders it, “In iron lay his body.”


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Psalms 105:18". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/psalms-105.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Whose feet they hurt with fetters,.... For it seems Joseph was not only cast into prison, upon the calumny of his mistress; but had fetters put upon him, and his feet were made fast with them; and these were so close and heavy, as to pinch and gall and hurt him; which, though not mentioned in his history, was undoubtedly true; see Genesis 39:20.

He was laid in iron: or "the iron" (or, as the Targum, "the iron chain") "went into his Soul"F6So Pagninus, Montanus, Vatablus. ; his body; it ate into him, and gave him great pain: or rather, as it is in the king's Bible, "his soul went into the iron chain"; there being, as Aben Ezra observes, an ellipsis of the particle ב, and which is supplied by Symmachus, and so in the Targum; that is, his body was enclosed in iron bands, so BuxtorfF7Lexic. "in voce" ברזל. . In all this he was a type of Christ, whose soul was made exceeding sorrowful unto death: he was seized by the Jews, led bound to the high priest, fastened to the cursed tree, pierced with nails, and more so with the sins of his people he bore; and was laid in the prison of the grave; from whence and from judgment he was brought, Isaiah 53:8.


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Psalms 105:18". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/psalms-105.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

hurt with fetters — (Genesis 40:3).

was laid in iron — literally, “his soul” (see on Psalm 16:10), or, “he came into iron,” or, he was bound to his grief (compare Psalm 3:2; Psalm 11:1). The “soul” is put for the whole person, because the soul of the captive suffers still more than the body. Joseph is referred to as being an appropriate type of those “bound in affliction and iron” (Psalm 107:10).


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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Psalms 105:18". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/psalms-105.html. 1871-8.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

18They afflicted his feet in the fetters It is not without cause that the Psalmist prosecutes the winding course of Jacob’s early history, which might so confuse the minds of men as to prevent them from directing their attention to the counsel of God. What seemed less likely than to believe that God, by so directly opposite and circuitous a path, meant to accomplish what he had purposed? But his providence, by surmounting so many obstacles, is brought out more conspicuously, than if he had despatched the whole matter by a short and easy road. Had Joseph, as soon as he arrived in Egypt, been presented to the king, and made its governor, the way to what followed would have been easy. But when he was carried away to prison, and lay there separated from the society of men, living as one half-dead; and when his becoming known to the king was a long time subsequent to this, and beyond all expectation, such a sudden change renders the miracle much more evident. This circuitous course then, which the prophet recounts, serves not a little to illustrate the subject in hand. Joseph was many times dead before he was sold. Hence it follows, that God as often showed his care of his Church by delivering him who might be termed her father. When after, having been brought into Egypt, Joseph was conveyed from hand to hand till he descended into another grave, is it not the more clearly manifest from this that God, while he seems to be asleep in heaven, is all the while keeping the strictest watch over his servants, and that he is carrying forward his purpose more effectually by these various windings, than if he had gone straight forward, yea, than if he had run with rapid pace? For this reason the prophet affirms that his feet were afflicted in the fetters; a fact which, although not stated in the narrative of Moses, he speaks of as well known. And no doubt, many things were delivered by tradition to the Jews of which no mention is made in the Scriptures. (212) It is also probable enough, that, instead of being put at first under mild restraint, as was afterwards the case, he was rigorously confined. Whether we read, his soul entered into the iron, or the iron entered into his soul, (213) the meaning, which, in either case, is exactly the same, amounts to this, that the holy man was so galled with fetters, that it seemed as if his life had been given over to the sword. Whence it follows, that the safety of his life was as hopeless as the restoration of life to a dead body.


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Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Psalms 105:18". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/psalms-105.html. 1840-57.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Psalms 105:18 Whose feet they hurt with fetters: he was laid in iron:

Ver. 18. Whose feet they hurt with fetters] God hereby fitting him for that great service; as he did afterwards Moses, by forty years’ banishment in Midian, and David, by Saul’s persecution, till his soul was even as a weaned child, Psalms 131:2.

He was laid in iron] Heb. His soul came into iron; or, the iron entered into his soul; but sin entered not into his conscience. See a like phrase Luke 2:35.


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Psalms 105:18". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/psalms-105.html. 1865-1868.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Heb. his soul came into iron; which seems to be added emphatically to aggravate his imprisonment, and to show how grievous it was to his very soul, which must needs sympathize with his body, and moreover was greatly vexed to consider both the great injury which was done to him, and yet the foul and public scandal which lay upon him.


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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Psalms 105:18". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/psalms-105.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

18. Hurt with fetters—The Egyptian laws were very severe against the crime of which Joseph was wickedly charged. “An attempt at adultery was to be punished with one thousand blows.”Delitzsch. Joseph’s punishment was much lighter. Potiphar probably doubted the story of his wife. Still, Joseph was put with the “king’s prisoners” in a “dungeon,” or pit, “bound,” as guilty of a state crime, (Genesis 39:20,) until he obtained favour of the “keeper of the prison,” and his condition was alleviated.

He was laid in iron—Hebrew, his soul came into iron.


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Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Psalms 105:18". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/psalms-105.html. 1874-1909.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Wicked. Two hundred and fifty accomplices, (Numbers xv. 35.; Calmet) and fourteen thousand seven hundred murmurers. (Menochius)


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Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Psalms 105:18". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/psalms-105.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

Whose feet. Figure of speech Hysteresis. App-6. Further particulars Divinely revealed.

He = His soul. Hebrew. nephesh.

iron. Put by Figure of speech Metonomy (of Cause), for manacles made from it.


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Psalms 105:18". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/psalms-105.html. 1909-1922.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(18) He was laid in iron.—The Prayer Book Version, “the iron entered into his soul,” has established itself so firmly among expressive proverbial sayings, that the mind almost resents the Authorised Version. The grammar of the clause does not decide its sense with certainty; for its syntax is rather in favour of the Prayer Book Version, though the feminine form of the verb makes in favour of the marginal rendering. Symmachus has, “his soul came into iron;” the LXX., “his soul passed through iron.” The Vulg., however, has the other Version, “the iron passed through his soul”—first found in the Targum. The parallelism is in favour of the Authorised Version.


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These files are public domain.
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Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Psalms 105:18". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/psalms-105.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Whose feet they hurt with fetters: he was laid in iron:
Whose
Genesis 39:20; 40:15; Acts 16:24
he was laid in iron
Heb. his soul came into iron.
107:10

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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Psalms 105:18". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/psalms-105.html.

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