corner graphic

Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Psalms 105:42

 

 

For He remembered His holy word With Abraham His servant;

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

For he remembered … - He was faithful to his promise made to Abraham, and did not forget his descendants in the hour of need. This is the statement made in Psalm 105:8-9; and to illustrate and confirm the faithfulness of God, this reference is made to the history of the Hebrew people. See the notes at those verses.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Psalms 105:42". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/psalms-105.html. 1870.

Coffman's Commentaries on the Bible

ISRAEL ENTERS THE LAND OF CANAAN

"For he remembered his holy word,

And Abraham his servant.

And he brought forth his people with joy,

And his chosen with singing.

And he gave them the lands of the nations;

And they took the labors of the peoples in possession."

The previous three verses were a summary of the forty-years in the wilderness; and these three verses condense the entire history of the Conquest of Canaan under Joshua into these few lines. The whole Book of Joshua is devoted to the record of what is here stated so briefly.

In context, the psalmist is here declaring, simply, that God who had promised to deliver the land of Canaan to the patriarchs actually did so, the four centuries intervening notwithstanding.


Copyright Statement
James Burton Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.

Bibliography
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Psalms 105:42". "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/psalms-105.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

For he remembered his holy promise,.... It was not owing to the goodness of this people, to their obedience to the divine will, to any worthiness or merit of theirs, that such signs and wonders were wrought for them in Egypt; and that they were brought out from thence in such a manner as they were; and were protected and so plentifully provided for in the wilderness; but it was owing to the grace and goodness of God, to his covenant and promise, which he sacredly and inviolably observed; the grace and covenant of God are the source and spring of all blessings of goodness; he is ever mindful of his covenant, and therefore sends meat to them that fear him, as he did to the Israelites, Psalm 111:5.

And Abraham his servant; or the promise he made to Abraham his servant; so the Targum,

"which "was" with Abraham his servant;'

that is, which holy word or promise was with Abraham, was spoken to him; and was with him, that he would give him and his seed the land of Canaan; and that though they should be afflicted long in Egypt, yet should come out from thence with great substance, Genesis 15:13, this he remembered, as he never forgets any promise of his, nor ever suffers his faithfulness to fail, nor his covenant to be broken. Hence it follows,


Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Psalms 105:42". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/psalms-105.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

For he remembered his holy x promise, [and] Abraham his servant.

(x) Which he confirms to the posterity in whom after a sort the dead live and enjoy the promises.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Psalms 105:42". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/psalms-105.html. 1599-1645.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

42.For he remembered his holy promise The Psalmist again mentions the cause why God dealt so graciously with that people, and sustained them so tenderly, namely, that he might fulfill his promise; for he had entered into a covenant with Abraham, engaging to be the God of his seed. Nor did the prophets without cause teach so carefully as we find them doing, that the free covenant is the fountain whence the deliverance, and the continual welfare of the people flowed. Thereby the grace of God became better known, since what took place, so far from happening upon the sudden, and without anticipation, was only the fulfillment of what he had promised four hundred years before. God then, for ages previous to this, gave the light of his word of promise, that his grace and truth might be brought the more distinctly into view. For this reason the prophet again repeats, that God was not led from some new cause to deliver his people, but that his design in doing so was to prove the faithfulness of his covenant, and to give it effect; just as if a man should dig up from the ground a treasure which he had buried in it. Nor is it to be doubted, that the prophet aimed at leading the faith of his countrymen still farther, — that his object was that their posterity might be persuaded beyond all doubt, that as God had then proved, in the experience of that generation, the sure and substantial truth of his promise delivered many hundred years before, so he would not be to them otherwise than their fathers had found him to be in times past. Accordingly, he signalises this promise by the epithet, holy, intimating, that after the death of Abraham it retained its virtue and efficacy unimpaired. God had spoken it to Abraham; but the force of the covenant died not with him. God continued to show himself faithful towards the posterity of the patriarch.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Psalms 105:42". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/psalms-105.html. 1840-57.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Psalms 105:42 For he remembered his holy promise, [and] Abraham his servant.

Ver. 42. For he remembered his holy promise] Holy, that is, firm, and inviolable, Heb. the word of his holiness, that is, his sacred and gracious engagement, whereby he had made himself a voluntary debtor to Abraham’s posterity.

And Abraham his servant] To whom he had passed his promise four hundred and thirty years before. Nullum tempus occurrit regi.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Psalms 105:42". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/psalms-105.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Psalms 105:42. His holy promise, and Abraham The word of his holiness with Abraham. See Psalms 105:8-9.

REFLECTIONS.—1st, Before the Psalmist enters on his subject, he prefaces his discourse with an exhortation to all around him,

1. To exalt and magnify the great and glorious God, and this in a variety of ways. Give him thanks for all his mercies past and present, and all his promises so rich and gracious. Call upon his name in humble faith, assured of being heard and answered: make known his deeds, what great things he has done for your souls and bodies, to encourage the hope, and excite the praises of all the righteous: talk ye of all his wondrous works, let them be the delightful daily subject of your conversation. Sing unto him, sing psalms unto him, in tongue as well as heart rejoice, ye that seek the Lord, as the grand object of your desires, and the rock of your hopes. Yea, glory in his holy name, renouncing all glorying in yourselves, to make mention only of his inestimably precious righteousness and grace. Seek the Lord and his strength, who alone can enable you to stand against your spiritual foes, and overcome them: seek his face evermore, in ceaseless prayer in this world, that you may behold the light of his countenance for ever in a better.

2. Abundant reason there is why we should thus do, if we consider, (1.) His past mercies, works of providence and grace, wonderful and great, such as Israel experienced in Egypt and the desart, and as the people of God daily find in their journey through this world's wilderness; and the judgments of his mouth, his revealed word, according to which we must finally be judged, and which will bring upon us the heaviest condemnation, if we forget or neglect the great salvation therein contained. (2.) Our interest in him, as the Lord our God, our Jehovah, all-sufficient to supply every want of his people, worthy their most enlarged praise; and to engage them thereunto, offering himself to be their portion and exceeding great reward. (3.) His universal government, his judgments are in all the earth; and as the God of all the earth, he is most worthy to be obeyed and adored by all, and for ever: or it may refer to the judgments of his vengeance on the wicked, in the flood, in the destruction of Sodom and Gomorrah, or in the plagues of Egypt; the fame of which were spread abroad, and God's justice and holiness therein manifested; for which praise should be ascribed to him.

2nd, The grand subject of the Psalmist's thanksgiving is, the covenant established in Christ Jesus.

1. God revealed it to Abraham; and, as the type of the eternal inheritance designed for his faithful spiritual children, assured him of the possession of the land of Canaan as the inheritance of his natural posterity.

2. He fulfilled the promise in opposition to all human appearances, notwithstanding the difficulties which seemed insurmountable. They were few, very few; strangers, not possessed of a foot of land; driven from place to place, sojourning sometimes in Egypt, sometimes in Philistia, on account of the famine; but, in all their wanderings, still they experienced the divine protection; restrained by divine power, none dared to lift their hand to hurt them; and even kings are reproved, and warned how dangerous it would be to touch God's anointed ones, or harm his prophets. Note; (1.) The faithful people of God are indeed strangers and pilgrims upon earth, but God hath prepared for them a city: when their wanderings here below are ended, there remaineth for them an eternal rest. (2.) God's prophets are his peculiar care; he who toucheth them toucheth the apple of his eye, so jealous is he to vindicate their wrongs.

3. In the extraordinary case of Joseph, God, in a most astonishing providential manner, opened a way for the accomplishment of his designs of mercy towards them. He sent a famine on the land of Canaan, and brake the whole staff of bread, so that instant death and utter destruction seemed to threaten them; but he had made provision for their sustenance by means of Joseph, whom, though his envious brethren had wickedly sold for a slave, God had designed to send as their deliverer, after having experienced the deepest distresses, under the most cruel and unjust accusations of an enraged mistress; doomed to the lowest dungeon, bound in fetters of iron, and loaded with the most ignominious reproaches; but all wrought together for his good: when his faith and patience had been tried, God's word came unto him; and, divinely taught to interpret the dreams of his fellow-prisoners, the fame of it reached the court of Pharaoh, who sought the inspired prisoner. Convinced, by his interpretation of his dreams, that God's Spirit dwelt within him, the king loosed his bands, and vindicated his injured innocence from the accusations laid against him; advanced him to the highest post in his kingdom; delegated to him the exercise of his royal power to enact laws which all, even the greatest, must obey; and, wiser than the aged senators, appointed him their teacher, whence probably flowed the superior wisdom of the Egyptians. By him, his aged father and all his family were brought to Egypt, and in the land of Goshen richly provided for during the days of famine; where they increased exceedingly, and God's promises began to take effect. Note; (1.) Mysterious are the ways of Providence. When all things seem most against us, they are often really working for our good. (2.) Joseph, in his humiliation and exaltation is the type of Jesus, whose sufferings far exceeded, and whose glory infinitely excelleth. (3.) In every advancement we must remember whose hand hath raised us, and that we only then adorn our station, when we seek to make it subservient to the advancement of his kingdom and glory. (4.) Whatever calumnies and sufferings the saints of God endure, when their faith is tried, they shall be discharged with honour. (5.) God's church will never want a friend; he can raise them protectors where they least expect to find favour. (6.) We are sojourners on earth, as Jacob in that strange land: this is not our home nor our rest; nay, though never so much increased in worldly goods, we would not fit here below, but look for our promised Canaan, and long for our heavenly inheritance.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Psalms 105:42". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/psalms-105.html. 1801-1803.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Or rather, with (as this particle is oft used)

Abraham; made with or to Abraham.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Psalms 105:42". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/psalms-105.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

42. This and the following verses form the conclusion of the psalm.

He remembered—These wonders were in fulfilment of God’s covenant with Abraham, (Psalms 105:8-11,) and in reward of the patriarch’s fidelity.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Psalms 105:42". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/psalms-105.html. 1874-1909.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

promise. Same word as in Psalms 105:8, "word".


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Psalms 105:42". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/psalms-105.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

For he remembered his holy promise, and Abraham his servant.

For he remembered his holy promise - the ground of His wonderful acts of long-suffering tenderness.

(And) Abraham his servant - rather, connected with "promise;" 'His holy promise to Abraham' (Genesis 15:14-18). His promise is that engaging the possession of Canaan to Abraham's seed, Psalms 105:8-9; Psalms 105:11. Exodus 2:24 is alluded to.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Psalms 105:42". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/psalms-105.html. 1871-8.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

For he remembered his holy promise, and Abraham his servant.
For he
8-11; Genesis 12:7; 13:14-17; 15:14; Exodus 2:24; Luke 1:54,55,72,73
Abraham
Exodus 32:13; Deuteronomy 9:5,27; Micah 7:20

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Psalms 105:42". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/psalms-105.html.

To report dead links, typos, or html errors or suggestions about making these resources more useful use our convenient contact form
Powered by Lightspeed Technology