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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Psalms 108:10

 

 

Who will bring me into the besieged city? Who will lead me to Edom?

Adam Clarke Commentary

The strong city - The possession of the metropolis is a sure proof of the subjugation of the country.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Psalms 108:10". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/psalms-108.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Who will bring me … - This is taken, without alteration, from Psalm 60:9.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Psalms 108:10". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/psalms-108.html. 1870.

James Nisbet's Church Pulpit Commentary

OPENED CITY GATES

‘Who will bring me into the strong city? who will lead me into Edom?’

Psalms 108:10

I. The strong city built on the rock, even man’s hardened heart, stronger and more stony than the tomb, He has conquered and overcome; and in Him and His might are His people to carry on His warfare, casting down all the strongholds of human pride and stubbornness and unrepentance.

II. There is another application of these words which should not be overlooked.—According to Jewish tradition, Edom typifies Rome. Rome means ‘strength,’ and as the ‘great city which reigneth over the kings of the earth,’ it is regarded by many as having been the most formidable antagonist to God’s Word and God’s people. Even to-day, ‘the strong city’ of Romanism is the chief opponent of the Gospel on the Continent of Europe, and the soul zealous for the spread of God’s truth has still to cry, ‘Who will bring me into the strong city? who will lead me into Edom?’ and to add, if entrance for the Gospel is to be obtained, ‘Vain is the help of man. Through God we shall do valiantly.’

Illustrations

(1) ‘We cannot find it in our heart to dismiss this psalm (as most of the commentators have done) by merely referring the reader first to Psalms 57:7-11, and then to Psalms 60:5-12, though it will be at once seen that these two portions of Scripture are almost identical with the verses before us. The Holy Spirit is not so short of expressions that He needs to repeat Himself. There must be some intention in the arrangement of two former Divine utterances in a new connection.’

(2) ‘Let it be noted how over against God’s “strong city” stands another “strong city” in the 108th psalm, and how in the later strains of prophecy down to the Apocalypse, the destruction of a “strong city” is one great theme of joy.’


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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Nisbet, James. "Commentary on Psalms 108:10". Church Pulpit Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cpc/psalms-108.html. 1876.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

This he repeats in this place, either because, though the enemies were defeated and subdued, yet there was some strong city or cities which were not yet taken; or in way of thankful commemoration of God’s goodness in answering his former requests, as if he had said, I remember this day, to thy glory and my own comfort, my former straits and dangers, which made mile cry out, Who will bring me, &c.?


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Psalms 108:10". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/psalms-108.html. 1685.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Out. Hebrew, "seek." St. Jerome, "be sought after," which implies that the are rejected. (Houbigant) --- The being reduced to beg, is terrible to one who has been brought up in a better manner. --- Dwellings. Septuagint (Menochius) and St. Jerome, "ruins." The Jews were forbidden to weep over the ruins of Jerusalem, and are become vagabonds. (Calmet)


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Psalms 108:10". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/psalms-108.html. 1859.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Who will bring me into the strong city? who will lead me into Edom?
who will lead
20:6-8; 60:1; *title; Isaiah 63:1-6; Jeremiah 49:7-16; Obadiah 1:3,4

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Psalms 108:10". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/psalms-108.html.

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