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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Psalms 124:2

 

 

"Had it not been the LORD who was on our side When men rose up against us,

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

If it had not been the Lord who was on our side - Repeating the idea, since the mind was full of it, and carrying the thought forward. This is one of the instances of an ascent of thought in these psalms, from which it has been supposed that the title “Songs of Degrees” was given to this collection. See, however, Introduction to Psalm 120:1-7.

When men rose up against us - When we were assailed by our enemies. On what occasion this occurred, it is now impossible to determine.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Psalms 124:2". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/psalms-124.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

If it had not been the Lord who was on our side,.... This he repeats both for the confirmation of it, and to excite the attention of the Israelites to it; as well as to observe that it was not once only, but again and again, many times the Lord appeared to be on their side. The Targum renders it,

"the Word of the Lord;'

the essential Word, the Son of God; and so in Psalm 123:1, in the king's Bible;

when men rose up against us; wicked men; though no hard epithet is given in the text, however just. The enemies of God's people are only called "men" by them, to show their meekness and patience; it is in the singular number, "when man rose up"; hence Aroma interprets it of Pharaoh king of Egypt; and R. Obadiah of Haman: but it might be better interpreted of the man of sin, the man of the earth; who, at the head of his antichristian party, has rose up against the saints, oppressed them, and threatened them with utter ruin, 2 Thessalonians 2:4. Though it is best to understand it of a body of men; of men not mean, but mighty; not few, but numerous; and who united as one man against the people of God, and rose up against them in an hostile manner; being full of enmity to them, and bent upon their ruin.


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Psalms 124:2". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/psalms-124.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

against, etc. — (Psalm 3:1; Psalm 56:11).


Copyright Statement
These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Psalms 124:2". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/psalms-124.html. 1871-8.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

2.But for Jehovah who was on our side. It is not without cause that he twice repeats the same sentence. So long as we are in danger our fear is immoderate; but no sooner are we delivered than we lessen the greatness of our calamity, and Satan, deceiving us by this artifice, leads us to obscure the grace of God. Since then, after having been wonderfully preserved by the Lord, we for the most part devise all sorts of imaginary circumstances, in order to efface from our minds the remembrance of his grace, David, by introducing the people as struck with amazement, purposely dwells upon the amplification of the danger. In these words a bridle is put upon us, to keep us meditating upon our dangers, lest the sense of God’s grace should vanish from our minds. The common translation, Had not the Lord been on our side, does not sufficiently express David’s meaning; for he affirms that the deliverance and the salvation of the people proceeded from nothing else than God’s succor, and at the same time shows that this succor was both certain and evident. Two things then are here to be distinctly noticed; first, that the Lord had been at hand to afford aid to his servants, and had taken their part; and secondly, that being already in a desperate condition, they could not by help from any other quarter, or in another manner, have escaped from danger. Thus we are taught, that men then only ascribe the glory of their preservation to God, when they are persuaded of his being so favourably inclined towards them as to defend them and maintain them safe. In the second clause there is extolled in high terms the infinite power of God, of which he had given abundant proof in delivering the people, to teach us that such a manner of preserving does not belong to man. By the noun אדם , adam, which when it is collective signifies men in general, David seems to denote a vast number of enemies. The people of God, as if he had said, had not to contend merely against a few men, or against one nation, but were assailed by almost the whole world; it being abundantly manifest that all mankind were the enemies of the Jews.


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Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Psalms 124:2". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/psalms-124.html. 1840-57.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Psalms 124:2 If [it had not been] the LORD who was on our side, when men rose up against us:

Ver. 2. When men rose] Monsters rather; but such as think themselves the only men alive, and us the only slaves and zanies.


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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Psalms 124:2". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/psalms-124.html. 1865-1868.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

2. When men rose up against—The idea is that of a sudden rising, an open and hostile uprising.


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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Psalms 124:2". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/psalms-124.html. 1874-1909.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

About it. Coming from Joppe, travellers cannot see the city till they are very near it, though with respect to Judea, it is very elevated. Hence Josephus styles it "the navel of the land." (Jewish Wars iii. 2., or 4.) --- The construction of the Vulgate is very natural. (Calmet) --- For the promise regards the inhabitants, rather than the place, as Hebrew would insinuate. --- Lord. Zacharias ii. 5. Heresiarchs have in vain risen up against the Church, though they were able men, like mountains. (St. Augustine)


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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Psalms 124:2". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/psalms-124.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

men. Hebrew. "adam. App-14. (Sing, refers to Sennacherib).

they. The plural, referring to Sennacherib"s hosts; likened to a stream and waters in verses: Psalms 124:4, Psalms 124:5. See note on Psalms 46:3.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Psalms 124:2". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/psalms-124.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

If it had not been the LORD who was on our side, when men rose up against us:

If (it had not been) the Lord who was on our side. The repetition (cf. Psalms 124:1) marks that the Lord's interposition had been more than once.

When men rose up against us. However many and powerful be men, the believer, who has the Lord on his side, need not fear what man (a creature of earth) can do unto him (Psalms 56:11).


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Psalms 124:2". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/psalms-124.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(2) If it had not been.—For this motto of the covenant, see Psalms 94:17.

Men.—Better, man. In this use of the general term, we must, as Reuss points out, see an indication of the time of composition of the psalm. One who could so speak of the whole world as separated into two parts (Jews and heathen), discloses a sense of isolation and exclusiveness which brings us far down from the time of the prophets. They, indeed, spoke of it as the ideal of the future. This psalmist regards it as an accomplished fact.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Psalms 124:2". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/psalms-124.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

If it had not been the LORD who was on our side, when men rose up against us:
when men
21:1,2; 3:1; 22:12,13,16; 37:32; Numbers 16:2,3

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Psalms 124:2". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/psalms-124.html.

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