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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Psalms 124:5

 

 

Then the raging waters would have swept over our soul."

Adam Clarke Commentary

Then the proud waters - The proud Haman had nearly brought the flood of desolation over our lives.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Psalms 124:5". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/psalms-124.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Then the proud waters had gone over our soul - Over us. The word proud here is applied to the waters as if raging, swelling, rolling, tumultuous; as if they were self-confident, arrogant, haughty. Such raging billows, as they break and dash upon the shore, are a striking embIem of human passions, whether in an individual, or in a gathering of men - as an army, or a mob. Compare Psalm 65:7. This is again an amplification, or an ascent of thought. See the notes at Psalm 124:2. It is, however, nothing more than a poetical embellisment, adding intensity to the expression.


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These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Psalms 124:5". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/psalms-124.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Then the proud waters had gone over our soul. The wicked, who, through their pride, persecute the poor saints: these proud tyrants and persecutors would prevail over them, to their ruin and destruction; who, for their number, force, and strength, and especially for their pride and haughtiness, are like to the strong, boisterous, and swelling waves of the sea, were they not stopped and bounded by him who has said, Thus far shall ye go, and no farther, Job 38:11.


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Psalms 124:5". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/psalms-124.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

The epithet proud added to waters denotes insolent enemies.


Copyright Statement
These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Psalms 124:5". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/psalms-124.html. 1871-8.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Then the proud waters had gone over our soul.

The proud — Our enemies, compared to proud waters, for their great multitude and swelling rage.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Psalms 124:5". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/psalms-124.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Psalms 124:5 Then the proud waters had gone over our soul.

Ver. 5. Then the proud waters, &c.] The same again, to note the greatness both of the danger and of the deliverance. And it may teach us not lightly to pass over God’s great blessings, but to make the most of them.


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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Psalms 124:5". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/psalms-124.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Psalms 124:5. Then, &c.— Then it had passed over our soul, even {proud / swelling} waters.

REFLECTIONS.—The greater the danger is to which we are exposed, the greater doth the power and grace of our God appear in our rescue, and the more are we indebted to him in love and praise.

1. The enemies of God's church and people are many and mighty; rising up fierce as a lion, and ready to devour them, quick and eager in the pursuit, and raging in their wrath to destroy them. Then in that day of trial we may truly say, the waters had overwhelmed us, and the stream had gone over our soul; then the proud waters had gone over our soul, the floods of persecution, affliction, temptation had prevailed, and we had sunk as a stone in the mighty waters, if,—and a blessed if it is—

2. If it had not been the Lord, who was on our side, or with us, for our strength is weakness, and we have no power to stand, either against our foes without or within; but having a friend close to our side, one so faithful to stand by us, so almighty to save us, even Jehovah, we cannot sink under these mighty waters; fixed, as upon a munition of rocks, we may look down secure, and mock their impotent rage.

3. The Psalmist, in the person of the faithful, blessed God for their support and deliverance. Blessed be the Lord, who hath not given us as a prey to their teeth, he hath broken the teeth of the lions, our persecutors; and, as a bird from the fowler's snare, are we escaped from our wily foes. Note; When the faithful are nearest in appearance to be overcome, and perish, then shall they be made more eminently to experience the salvation of God.

4. Past experience encourages the faithful to stay themselves still upon God. Our help is in the name of the Lord; we have no other able or willing to save us, but he who made heaven and earth; and he can assuredly save to the uttermost. Let Israel therefore trust in the Lord.


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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Psalms 124:5". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/psalms-124.html. 1801-1803.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Our enemies, compared to

proud waters, for their great multitude, and swelling rage, and mighty force.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Psalms 124:5". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/psalms-124.html. 1685.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Bonds, obligationes. "Knots," as Greek: straggalias, also means, (Berthier) rather than duties. (Bellarmine) --- Some suspect that obligationes was put originally, as Hebrew means "crooked ways," (Calmet) "embarrassments." (Aquila) --- He may allude to the dark machinations of false brethren, who endeavoured to thwart the pious designs of Nehemias, vi. 14. Apostles shall be treated like infidels, (Calmet) or rather worse, as we shall be if we act not up to the lights, (Haydock) and graces which we have received. (Calmet) --- Those who enter into any covenant, &c., to uphold a false religion, though they may despise it in their hearts, must expect to be punished, while the Church shall have peace. (Worthington) --- Israel. St. Paul adds, of God, to shew who may be entitled to this blessing. (Berthier) --- Heretics can neither give nor receive this peace. (St. Augustine)


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Psalms 124:5". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/psalms-124.html. 1859.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Then the proud waters had gone over our soul.

Then the proud waters had gone over our soul. The term "proud" implies that the waters are figurative-namely, haughty enemies (Psalms 89:9).


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Psalms 124:5". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/psalms-124.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(5) Proud.—The Hebrew presents a rare form, which is considered indicative of later composition. For the epithet, comp. Æschylus, Prom. Vinct. 717:

“And you will reach the scornful river—well it deserves

the name.”


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Psalms 124:5". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/psalms-124.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Then the proud waters had gone over our soul.
the proud
93:3,4; Job 38:11; Jeremiah 5:22

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Psalms 124:5". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/psalms-124.html.

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