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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Psalms 124:7

 

 

Our soul has escaped as a bird out of the snare of the trapper; The snare is broken and we have escaped.

Adam Clarke Commentary

Our soul is escaped as a bird out of the snare - This is a fine image; and at once shows the weakness of the Jews, and the cunning of their adversaries. Haman had laid the snare completely for them; humanly speaking there was no prospect of their escape: but the Lord was on their side; and the providence that induced Ahasuerus to call for the book of the records of the kingdom to be read to him, as well indeed as the once very improbable advancement of Esther to the throne of Persia, was the means used by the Lord for the preservation of the whole Jewish people from extermination. God thus broke the snare, and the bird escaped; while the poacher was caught in his own trap, and executed. See the Book of Esther, which is probably the best comment on this Psalm.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Psalms 124:7". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/psalms-124.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Our soul is escaped - We have escaped; our life has been preserved.

As a bird out of the snare of the fowlers - By the breaking of the snare, or the gin. The bird is entangled, but the net breaks, and the bird escapes. See the notes at Psalm 91:3.

The snare is broken … - It was not strong enough to retain the struggling bird, and the captive broke away. So we seemed to be caught. The enemy appeared to have us entirely in his power, but escape came to us as it does to the bird when it finds the net suddenly break, and itself again at large.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Psalms 124:7". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/psalms-124.html. 1870.

The Biblical Illustrator

Psalms 124:7

Our soul is escaped as a bird.

Soul manumission

I. It is a liberation from a miserable bondage.

1. It is a bondage of the man himself.

2. It is a bondage associated with a sense of guilt.

3. It is a bondage from which God alone can deliver.

II. It is a liberation into a happy freedom. The freedom of the soul consists in the freest exercise of its intellectual faculties and spiritual powers. The freedom of the soul consists in being unconstrained by any force bur love for the infinite. “It is a glorious liberty.” Glorious on account of the hero who achieved it--glorious on account of the immortal blessedness it secures. (Homilist.)

The bird escaped from the snare

I. The soul compared to a bird.

1. It is a little bird, too--a sparrow, or one of the sparrow kind. “Our soul is escaped as a little bird”--not as a great bird that could break the net and free itself by its own force. A little bird fitly represents our soul when we are lowly in heart. In our unregenerate condition we think ourselves eaglets at the very least, but we are not great creatures after all. We talk of great men: we are all little in God’s sight. If He cares for sparrows, be sure He cares for souls, and when you think least of yourself, yet believe that the Lord regards you.

2. Again, our soul is like a little bird because it is so ignorant. Birds know little about snares, yet they know so much that “surely in vain is the net spread in the sight of any bird.” Even this slender wisdom is more than men display, for they fly into the net when it is spread in their sight; aye, into the selfsame net out of which, in God’s providence, they have just been permitted to escape. So foolish are we and ignorant, we are as birds ready for the lure, till the Lord teaches us wisdom; and even then we need hourly keeping, or we are entrapped by the destroyer.

3. Our soul is often like a little bird because it is so eager and venturesome. How birds will trust themselves in winter around traps of the simplest kind if but a few crumbs are used as bait! Alas, men are equally foolhardy: they see others perish, yet they follow their ways.

4. The little bird, also, when once taken in the net, is a good comparison with the soul captured by sin, for it is defenceless.

5. Souls are also like birds because they are the objects of snares.

II. The snare.

1. It is concealed. Always suspect that in a temptation to sin there is more than you can see. Never say that it is a little thing; for great evil lurks in a little fault. Death and destruction hide under apparently small offences.

2. Snares and traps are usually attractive. The poor bird sees seeds which he is fond of, and he goes for them, little judging that he is to give his life in exchange for brief enjoyment. So it is with Satan. He tempts us with pleasures, with the lust of the eye, the lust of the flesh, and the pride of life: we taste the sweet, and are pierced with the smart.

3. Satan’s snares, like the fowler’s, are sadly effectual. Multitudes upon multitudes are the victims of their own passions, victims of that hellish art which makes evil appear to be good. God save us from being taken in these most deadly snares!

III. The capture. How came the bird to be taken?

1. It may have been through hunger. If you are extremely needy, you may be tempted to do wrong to provide for your wife and family; I pray that you may never yield to the temptation, but trust in God, and He will deliver you without your putting forth your hand unto iniquity.

2. Other birds are taken merely by their appetite. They are not excessively hungry, but they enjoy certain choice seeds, and the fowler knows it; and he scatters such around the trap. Easy of body, indulgence of taste, the joy of being admired, the sweets of power and position, all these and many more have been the fowler’s baits.

3. Some persons are entrapped by fear. Birds have rushed into the net for fear of danger; many persons have become great offenders against God through lack of moral courage. They are afraid of the laughter of fools. They cannot bear the sarcasm of the so-called wise; and so they suppress truth, and join in sin to escape scorn.

4. Some little birds are lost by love of company. The fowler has a decoy-bird which sings sweetly or coquettes pleasantly, and the other birds must needs follow it. In the Church of God we lose many members by ungodly marriages.

IV. The escape.

1. It is due to God alone.

2. It is achieved by power. “The snare is broken”--the meshes torn with a strong hand, the steel trap dashed to pieces.

3. The escape is complete. Our deliverance must be entire, or it is not true.

V. The lesson. It ought to teach us--

1. To sing.

2. To trust.

3. To watch. “Let them not turn again to folly,” is one of God’s own cautions to His people. He has brought you up out of the horrible pit; do not play near the edge of it. He has set your feet on a rock; what have you to do with the miry clay? Get away from the slippery ground, and on the rock let your goings be established. (C. H. Spurgeon.)

The escape of the soul from danger

I. A melancholy fact supposed.

1. The sources of temptation are various.

2. The nature and limits of the power of temptation.

3. From no quarter, perhaps, are we more exposed to danger than from former habits of once-indulged and unrepented sin, because there is a constant predisposition, without great watchfulness, to yield again to pursuits upon which the sinner has once entered.

4. Our safety is found in early resistance.

II. A joyful triumph expressed. We may justify this joy in experiencing the Divine protection under those dangers which threaten the stability of our faith and hope--

1. From our knowledge of the mournful results of temptation in the ease of others.

2. Because evil resisted and overcome is an occasion of inward satisfaction and happiness. Temptation foiled is happiness begun.

3. Because every such victory is a pledge and precursor of final conquest.

III. A practical improvement demanded.

1. Rejoice that the power and grace of Christ are equal to the worst extremities of human character and condition.

2. Remember the power of prayer.

3. Importance of habits of watchfulness and self-denial.

4. Temptation is only for a season. (S. Thodey.)


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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "Psalms 124:7". The Biblical Illustrator. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/psalms-124.html. 1905-1909. New York.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Our soul is escaped as a bird out of the snare of the fowlers,.... The people of God are like little birds, being harmless and innocent, singing forth the praises of God for his goodness to them; as also because weak and unable to resist their foes; and worthless in themselves, like sparrows, as the wordF9כצפור ως σπουθιον, Sept. "sicut passer", V. L. here used signifies; and are fearful and timorous, and flee at the least apprehension of danger, Psalm 102:7. Satan, and wicked men under his influence, are like fowlers who lay snares for them, to draw them into sin, into immorality and error, in order to bring them to ruin and destruction; hence we read of the snare of the devil and of wicked men, 1 Timothy 3:7, 2 Timothy 2:26; and who form plans and lay schemes to oppress and destroy them; but through the wisdom given them to discern these devices and stratagems, and through the power of divine grace, accompanying them, they escape what was intended for their hurt, and particularly in the following manner:

the snare is broken, and we are escaped; measures concerted by wicked men are broken, their schemes are confounded, their devices are disappointed, so that they cannot perform their enterprise; and by this means the saints escape the evils designed against them, the afflictions of the world, and the temptations of Satan.


Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Psalms 124:7". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/psalms-124.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

Our soul is escaped as a bird out of the d snare of the fowlers: the snare is broken, and we are escaped.

(d) For the wicked not only furiously rage against the faithful, but craftily imagined to destroy them.

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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Psalms 124:7". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/psalms-124.html. 1599-1645.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Psalms 124:7 Our soul is escaped as a bird out of the snare of the fowlers: the snare is broken, and we are escaped.

Ver. 7. Our soul is escaped, &c.] Man’s extremity is God’s opportunity. See Genesis 22:14, Ezekiel 37:11, 2 Kings 19:3-4.

The snare is broken, &c.] God hath with as much ease delivered us as a bird net is broken.


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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Psalms 124:7". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/psalms-124.html. 1865-1868.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

7. Snare is broken, and we are escaped—Both snare and fowler are in God’s hands, and he will not only deliver his people, but crush the power of the enemy. The figure applies only to such an escape as is from the very teeth of death. They were already in the snarethe watchful fowler had only to take his prey.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Psalms 124:7". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/psalms-124.html. 1874-1909.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

PSALM CXXIV. (QUI CONFIDUNT.)

The just are always under God's protection.


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Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Psalms 124:7". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/psalms-124.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

as a bird. The reference is to the words of Sennacherib on his cylinder, where he mentions Hezekiah by name, whom he had got "as a bird in a cage". See App-67.


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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Psalms 124:7". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/psalms-124.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Our soul is escaped as a bird out of the snare of the fowlers: the snare is broken, and we are escaped.

Our soul is escaped as a bird out of the snare of the fowlers - (Psalms 91:3.)

The snare is broken, and we are escaped. The bird is shut out from escape, unless the snare be broken (cf. Psalms 25:15).


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Psalms 124:7". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/psalms-124.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(7) Snare.—Another rapid transition to a favourite figure, that of the hunter’s net. (Comp. Psalms 10:9, &c)


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Psalms 124:7". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/psalms-124.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Our soul is escaped as a bird out of the snare of the fowlers: the snare is broken, and we are escaped.
Our soul
1 Samuel 23:26,27; 24:14,15; 25:29; 2 Samuel 17:2,21,22
as a bird
25:15; 91:3; Proverbs 6:5; Jeremiah 5:26; 18:22; 2 Timothy 2:26

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Psalms 124:7". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/psalms-124.html.

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