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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Psalms 136:10

 

 

To Him who smote the Egyptians in their firstborn, For His lovingkindness is everlasting,

Adam Clarke Commentary

Smote Egypt in their first-born - This was one of the heaviest of strokes: a great part of the rising generation was cut off; few but old persons and children left remaining.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Psalms 136:10". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/psalms-136.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

To him that smote Egypt in their first-born - Exodus 12:29. That is, he struck them down, or destroyed them, by his own direct power.

For his mercy … - It was in mercy to his people. It was the means of their deliverance from bondage, for the Egyptians would not otherwise have suffered them to depart. By all the results of their deliverance both to themselves and to mankind, the act was seen to be an act of mercy to the world. It was better for mankind that the Hebrews should be delivered even at this sacrifice than it would have been that they should not be brought into the promised land.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Psalms 136:10". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/psalms-136.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

To him that smote Egypt in their firstborn,.... In a tender part, in the dear part of themselves, in their sons and heirs, and who were to inherit their lands and estates, and perpetuate their names; this was an act of justice for using ill the Lord's firstborn, the people of Israel, slaying their sons, and refusing to let them go, Exodus 1:13; and yet there was mercy in it, for which thanks were to be given to God;

for his mercy endureth for ever; the Israelites, in a very merciful manner, were distinguished by the blood sprinkled on their door posts, when the destroying angel passed through the land of Egypt to destroy their firstborn; and when they were destroyed, it was owing to the kind providence of God that the Egyptians did not rise as one man to cut off the Israelites in vengeance; and yet not a dog was suffered to move his tongue against them when the dismal cry was made; yea, this was the means of their deliverance, which could not be obtained by all the other plagues; but now they not only bid them go, but were urgent upon them to be gone, Exodus 11:5.


Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Psalms 136:10". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/psalms-136.html. 1999.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

10.Who smote the Egyptians in, their first-born Some read with their first-born, but the other rendering reads better. As we do not mean to sermonize upon the passage, it is unnecessary to detain the reader here with many words, as nothing is mentioned but what has been treated elsewhere. Only we may notice that the Egyptians are well said to have been smitten in their first-born, because they continued in their outrageous obstinacy under the other plagues, though occasionally terrified by them, but were broken and subdued by this last plague, and submitted. As it was not intended to recount all the wonders successively done in Egypt, the whole is summed up in one word when it is said, that he led his people forth from the midst of it with a mighty and a stretched out arm. For pressed down as they were on every side, it was only by a wonderful display of divine power that they could effect an escape. The figure of an outstretched arm is appropriate, for we stretch out the arm when any great effort is required; so that this implies that God put forth an extraordinary and not a common or slight display of his power in redeeming his people. (175)


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These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Psalms 136:10". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/psalms-136.html. 1840-57.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Psalms 136:10 To him that smote Egypt in their firstborn: for his mercy [endureth] for ever:

Ver. 10. To him that smote Egypt] See Psalms 135:8.


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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Psalms 136:10". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/psalms-136.html. 1865-1868.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

smote Egypt. Compare Exodus 12:29.


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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Psalms 136:10". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/psalms-136.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

To him that smote Egypt in their firstborn: for his mercy endureth for ever:

To him that smote Egypt in their first-born - i:e., in respect to, or in the person of, their first-born. To him that smote Egypt in their first-born - i:e., in respect to, or in the person of, their first-born.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Psalms 136:10". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/psalms-136.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(10) For his mercy.—Here the refrain, after the mention of the destruction of the Egyptian first-born, and subsequently after that of war and slaughter, sounds harsh to Christian ears. But the word mercy (khesed) in the Hebrew motto implies distinctly covenant grace, that special favour of Jehovah in which the heathen did not share, and which was often most signally shown in their destruction.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Psalms 136:10". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/psalms-136.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

To him that smote Egypt in their firstborn: for his mercy endureth for ever:
78:51; 105:36; 135:8; Exodus 11:5,6; 12:12,29; Hebrews 11:28

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Psalms 136:10". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/psalms-136.html.

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