corner graphic

Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Psalms 136:13

 

 

To Him who divided the Red Sea asunder, For His lovingkindness is everlasting,

Adam Clarke Commentary

Divided the Red Sea into parts - Some of the Jews have imagined that God made twelve paths through the Red Sea, that each tribe might have a distinct passage. Many of the fathers were of the same opinion; but is this very likely?


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Psalms 136:13". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/psalms-136.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

To him which divided the Red sea into parts - More literally, “Parted it into parts;” made parts of that which before was unbroken and a whole. It was actually divided into two parts, so that the Hebrews passed between them: Exodus 14:21-22.

For his mercy … - This, too, was an exercise of mercy, or a manifestation of benevolence toward them and toward the world, to be measured by all the good which would result from it in itself, and by all the power which was put forth to effect it.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Psalms 136:13". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/psalms-136.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

To him which divided the Red sea into parts,.... Into two parts, so that the waters of it stood as a wall on the right and left hand of the Israelites, as they passed through; this was done by means of a strong east wind, Exodus 14:21. The Jews have a tradition, which Jarchi, Kimchi, and Arama, make mention of, that the sea was divided into twelve parts, according to the twelve tribes of Israel, and every tribe had a path by itself to walk in; but for this there is no foundation: however, the dividing it into parts was a wonderful work, and a rich display of mercy to Israel;

for his mercy endureth for ever; the children of Israel were encompassed about, and in the utmost distress: the rocks were on each side, Pharaoh and his host behind them, the Red sea before them; and so no visible way of escape; but the Lord cut a way for them through the sea, and saved them. The sea is an emblem of this world, which is like a tempestuous troubled sea; where everything is restless, fluctuating, and passing away; where the people of God are tossed with tempests; and where afflictions, like the waves and billows of the sea, come over them one after another; and through which they must pass and enter the kingdom: and God, that wills, orders, and appoints them, sets these proud waves of the sea their bounds, or makes them a calm; and, sooner or later, makes a way through them and out of them, which is owing to his enduring mercy, 1 Corinthians 10:13.


Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Psalms 136:13". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/psalms-136.html. 1999.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

13.Who divided the Red Sea I have already (Psalms 106:7) spoken of the word סוף, suph, and have not therefore hesitated to render it the Red Sea The Psalmist speaks of divisions in the plural number, which has led some Jewish authors to conjecture that there must have been more passages than one — an instance of their solemn trifling in firings of which they know nothing, and of their method of corrupting the Scriptures entirely with their vain fancies. ‘We may well laugh at such fooleries, yet we are to hold them at the same time in detestation; for there can be no doubt that the Rabbinical writers were led to this by the devil, as an artful way of discrediting the Scriptures. Moses plainly and explicitly asserts that the heaps of waters stood up on both sides, from which we infer that the space between was one and undivided. (176) But as the people passed through in troops, and not one by one, the pathway being so broad as to admit of their passing freely men and women, with their families and cattle, the Psalmist very properly mentions divisions, with a reference to the people who passed through, this circumstance not a little enhancing the mercy of God, that they saw large depths or channels dried up, so that they had no difficulty in advancing in troops abreast. Another circumstance which confirmed or enhanced the mercy shown, was, that Pharaoh was shortly afterwards drowned; for the very different issue proved that it could not be owing to any hidden cause of a merely natural kind, that some should have perished, while others passed over with entire safety. The distinction made afforded a conspicuous display of God’s mercy in saving his people. Much is included in the single expression that God was the leader of his people through the wilderness. It was only by a succession of miracles of various kinds that they could have been preserved for forty years in a parched wilderness, where they were destitute of all the means of subsistence. So that we are to comprehend, under what is here stated, the various proofs of divine goodness and power which are mentioned by Moses as having been vouchsafed, in feeding his people with bread from heaven — in making water to flow from the rock — in protecting them under the cloud from the heat of the sun — giving them a sign of his presence in the pillar of fire — preserving their raiment entire — shielding them and their little ones in their exile wanderings under tents of leaves, (177) with innumerable other instances of mercy which must occur to the reader.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Psalms 136:13". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/psalms-136.html. 1840-57.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Psalms 136:13 To him which divided the Red sea into parts: for his mercy [endureth] for ever:

Ver. 13. To him which divided the Red Sea] Into twelve several parts, say the Jews, for the twelve tribes to pass through.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Psalms 136:13". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/psalms-136.html. 1865-1868.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

To him which divided the Red sea into parts: for his mercy endureth for ever:

To him which divided the Red sea into parts - literally, 'into divisions' (Exodus 14:22, "The Lord caused the sea to go back by a strong east wind all that night, and made the sea dry land, and the waters were divided"). The 'divisions' were the two parts of the one division-the one on the right hand, the other on the left. The Rabbins fancied from this passage that the Red Sea was divided into as many divisions as there were tribes-namely, twelve, in order that each tribe should have its own way open before it. But Exodus 14:1-31 disproves this. At the same time the language implies that He divided it most widely, so that they passed abreast, not merely by twos or threes, but by thousands (Gejer). A northeast wind striking the sea at Ayun Mousa would sweep the whole breadth of the sea for sixteen or eighteen miles in front. This is just what the Mosaic narrative requires. Almost three millions, with flocks and herds, had to cross the sea in one night. The Wady Mousa (the valley of Moses) or Tawarik (i:e., the valley of nocturnal travelers: cf. Exodus 12:31-42) presents the only level and open space along the Egyptian shore or west side, and is eighteen miles between the extreme points, Baal-zephon and Migdol. Along the whole fine of eighteen miles at once the Israelite army entered the dry channel Not one needless hour was lost in reaching the opposite side. To have crossed in one night was impossible, except by entering by thousands, or even tens of thousands, simultaneously and abreast. Opposite are the Ayun Mousa - i:e., wells of Moses (C. Forster).


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Psalms 136:13". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/psalms-136.html. 1871-8.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

To him which divided the Red sea into parts: for his mercy endureth for ever:
66:5,6; 74:13; 78:13; 106:9-11; Exodus 14:21,22,29; Isaiah 63:12,13; Hebrews 11:29

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Psalms 136:13". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/psalms-136.html.

To report dead links, typos, or html errors or suggestions about making these resources more useful use our convenient contact form
Powered by Lightspeed Technology