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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Psalms 141:10

 

 

Let the wicked fall into their own nets, While I pass by safely.

Adam Clarke Commentary

Let the wicked fall into their own nets - This is generally the case; those who lay snares for others fall into them themselves. Harm watch, harm catch, says the old adage. How many cases have occurred where the spring guns that have been set for thieves have shot some of the family! I have known some dismal cases of this kind, where some of the most amiable lives have been sacrificed to this accursed machine.

Whilst - I withal escape - They alone are guilty; they alone spread the nets and gins; I am innocent, and God will cause me to escape.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Psalms 141:10". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/psalms-141.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Let the wicked fall into their own nets - See the notes at Psalm 35:8. Compare Psalm 7:15-16.

While that I withal escape - Margin, as in Hebrew, “pass over.” While I safely pass over the net or snare which has been secretly laid for me. The word “withal” means, in the Hebrew, “together, at the same time;” that is, At the same time that they fall into the net, let me pass over it in safety. See the notes at Job 5:13.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Psalms 141:10". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/psalms-141.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Let the wicked fall into their own nets,.... Which they have laid for others, as they very often do; see Psalm 7:15; or "into his net"F11במכמריו "in retiacula ejus", Pagninus, Montanus; "in retia ejus", Vatablus, Cocceius; so Ainsworth. , either Saul into his own net, and others with him, so Kimchi and Ben Melech; or the wicked into the net which God has laid for them; see Ezekiel 12:13;

whilst that I withal escape; or "whilst I together escape", or "pass over"F12יחד "simul transeam", Montanus, Vatablus, Musculus; "una cum meis transiturus sum", Piscator. ; that is, while he, together with his companions, passed over the net laid; or,

"till I pass over safe and sound,'

will all mine, as NoldiusF13Concord. Partic. Ebr. Chald. p. 363. No. 1279. so Michaelis. ; not only pass over and escape the snares of the wicked, but pass out of this world into a state of happiness and glory in another.


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Psalms 141:10". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/psalms-141.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

Let the wicked fall into i their own nets, k whilst that I withal escape.

(i) Into God's nets, by which he catches the wicked in their own malice.

(k) So that none of them escape.


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Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Psalms 141:10". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/psalms-141.html. 1599-1645.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Psalms 141:10 Let the wicked fall into their own nets, whilst that I withal escape.

Ver. 10. Let the wicked fall] Metaphora a piscibus, saith Tremellius, as fishes in casting nets, Isaiah 19:8.

Whilst that I withal escape] The righteous is delivered out of trouble, and the wicked cometh in his stead, Proverbs 9:8. It appeareth at length that simple honesty is the best policy, and wicked policy the greatest simplicity, and most self-destructive.


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Psalms 141:10". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/psalms-141.html. 1865-1868.

Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary

REFLECTIONS

BLESSED Jesus! under the incense of thy merits, and with a steady unwearied eye looking to thee and thy one all-sufficient sacrifice, would my soul desire, morning by morning, and evening by evening, to come before thy mercy-seat; and in language like this sweet Psalm, would I pray that my poor prayer, and my uplifted hands, should set forth my only hope, my only dependence on thee. Oh! for grace, blessed Lord, to be always habitually prepared for this employment, in being forever clothed with thy righteousness, and having all the ascension-gifts of thy Spirit implanted in my heart! Then would the actual exercises of grace upon thee, and to thee, be manifested in the going forth of my soul in faith and supplication, in love and praise. Then should I cry out with the church: Because of the savour of thy good ointment, thy name is as ointment poured forth, therefore do the virgins love thee. And while my soul is looking unto thee, hanging upon thee, and longing for thee with an earnestness that nothing but enjoyment can satisfy, I shall praise thee with joyful lips. Jesus will then bring me into his banqueting house, and his banner over me will be love. Then the noise without, and even the smiting of those that would reproach me within, will only tend to make Jesus more precious. Mine eyes shalt be looking unto the Lord, who will keep me from every snare, and at length bring me home to his heavenly kingdom!


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Bibliography
Hawker, Robert, D.D. "Commentary on Psalms 141:10". "Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/pmc/psalms-141.html. 1828.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Into their own nets, Heb. into his nets; either into God’s nets, the relative being put without the antecedent, as is usual in such cases, where it is easily understood; or, each

into his own nets, to wit, the mischiefs which he designs against me.

Withal, or, together, to wit, with my followers; or, in like manner, as I have done formerly. But this word may seem to be more fitly joined to the foregoing clause, to which it is next placed in the Hebrew, and the verse may be and is by divers, both ancient and later translators, thus rendered, Let the wicked fall (or, the wicked shall fall) into their own nets together, (altogether, or alike, one as well as another, Saul himself not excepted, whom though I dare not destroy, God will judge,)

whilst that I escape; am preserved from that common calamity in which mine enemies shall perish; which was verified by the event. For David was strangely kept out of harm’s way when Saul and others of David’s enemies were cut off by the Philistines, 1Sa 31.


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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Psalms 141:10". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/psalms-141.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

10. Let the wicked fall, etc.The verb is in the declarative futurethe wicked shall fall into their own nets.

Whilst that I withal escape—The Hebrew pointing seems at fault here. Yahad, “together,” (English version “withal,”) belongs to the previous hemistich, and the whole should read:

The wicked together shall fall into their own nets;

Meanwhile I shall pass over [safely.]


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Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Psalms 141:10". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/psalms-141.html. 1874-1909.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

PSALM CXLI. (VOCE MEA.)

A prayer of David in extremity of danger.


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Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Psalms 141:10". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/psalms-141.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

the wicked = lawless ones. Hebrew. rasha". App-44.

withal = Same as "yet", Psalms 141:5.

escape = pass on [in safety].


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Psalms 141:10". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/psalms-141.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Let the wicked fall into their own nets, whilst that I withal escape.

Let the wicked fall into their own nets - (Psalms 140:9-10; Psalms 7:15.)

While that I withal escape - literally, 'pass over.' "Withal" - i:e., at the same time, or in the meantime [ yachad (Hebrew #3162)]. Maurer translates, 'until that I in all my parts (i:e., wholly) shall have escaped:' so Job 10:8.


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Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Psalms 141:10". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/psalms-141.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(10) Comp. Psalms 7:15.

Withal.—Probably, altogether (“whilst I altogether escape”), which some join with the previous clause, “Let the wicked fall into their own nets together, whilst I escape.”


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Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Psalms 141:10". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/psalms-141.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Let the wicked fall into their own nets, whilst that I withal escape.
the wicked
7:15,16; 35:8; 37:14,15; 64:7,8; 140:9; Esther 7:10; Proverbs 11:8
escape
Heb. pass over.

Copyright Statement
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Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Psalms 141:10". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/psalms-141.html.

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