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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Psalms 144:1

 

 

Blessed be the LORD, my rock, Who trains my hands for war, And my fingers for battle;

Adam Clarke Commentary

Teacheth my hands to war - To use sword, battle-axe, or spear.

And my fingers to fight - To use the bow and arrows, and the sling.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Psalms 144:1". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/psalms-144.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Blessed be the Lord my strength - Margin, as in Hebrew, “my rock.” See the notes at Psalm 18:46, where the same expression occurs in the Hebrew.

Which teacheth my hands to war - Hebrew, “To the war.” See the notes at Psalm 18:34. The Hebrew is not precisely alike, but the sense is the same.

And my fingers to fight - Hebrew, my fingers to the fight. That is, he teaches my fingers so that I can skillfully use them in battle. Probably the immediate reference here is to the use of the bow - placing the arrow, and drawing the string.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Psalms 144:1". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/psalms-144.html. 1870.

Coffman's Commentaries on the Bible

PSALM 144

THANKSGIVING FOR ISRAEL'S HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS MORNING

This glorious hymn of thanksgiving came upon the realization of David and all Israel that "the morning" he had so earnestly prayed for in the preceding psalm (Psalms 143:8) had indeed dawned. A united, happy Israel were enjoying great prosperity and peace following the defeat and death of Absalom. Upon the horizon of Israel's future, there still appeared the external threat of foreign enemies; and the psalmist includes a prayer unto God for their defeat (Psalms 144:5-8).

There is no doubt whatever of the Davidic authorship as stated in the superscription. We have lost all patience with unreasonable denials of this and with arbitrary dating of the psalm in "post-exilic times."[1] The exuberant happiness and prosperity of this psalm absolutely forbid its assignment to times after the captivity. Never one time in those long post-exilic centuries did Israel enjoy the prosperity visible here.

We deplore the near-unanimous clamor of critics denying all of this last group of Davidic psalms to their true author. Such views might have been tenable in the first quarter of this century, prior to the torpedo that shot down the myth that Aramaisms are a sign of post-exilic date. However, after the discoveries of the Ras Shamra expedition have been well-known for half a century, here come the die-hard critics alleging late dates on the basis that, "The vocabulary contains Aramaic ... elements."[2]

"Nothing but the disease that closes the eyes to fact and opens them to fancy could have led learned critics to ascribe this psalm to anyone except David."[3] What is that disease? In some instances, it might very well be the "darkening," "hardening" or "blinding" mentioned by Paul in Romans 1.

AUTHORSHIP. Of course, we accept the Davidic authorship of Psalms 144, and shall here outline our reasons for doing so.

(1) The superscription so ascribes it; and the ancient superscriptions are at least as dependable as the speculative guesses of modern critics.

(2) Mitchell Dahood ascribed the language of this psalm, based upon technical observations, "To the tenth century B.C."[4] Those, of course, were the times of David.

(3) The psalm is freely admitted to be "A Royal Psalm."[5] That fact alone eliminates the post-exilic period as a possible date, because Israel never had anything that even resembled a king following their return from exile.

(4) As noted above, the prosperity of Israel as revealed in the psalm, came not in the post-exilic period but in the days of the monarchy.

(5) In Psalms 144:10, the psalmist refers to himself as "David"; and only one of Israel's kings ever bore that name. Furthermore, the name "David" does not mean "some member of the Davidic dynasty."

(6) In Psalms 144:9, the psalmist promised to sing a new song, accompanying himself on a harp with ten strings. What other king in the whole history of Israel was either a singer or a proficient player on the harp? The silence of the critics on this point is deafening! Only David could have made such a promise.

(7) The style, language, thought-patterns, etc. are David's and only his. The critical device for meeting this argument is their unsupported, unprovable and ridiculous postulation that "some imitator" carefully put together a "mosaic" of known Davidic sayings to produce this psalm. They realize, of course, that the psalm contains a great deal of new, original material found nowhere else. How do they get around that? Dummelow tells us how! Psalms 144:12-15," are supposed to be, "A quotation from a lost Psalm, possibly by David."[6] The remarkable thing here is that the critics have no trouble at all ascribing that `lost psalm' to David. Behold here the genius of criticism which boldly ascribes some psalm that was never seen, or never heard of, to David, but, contrary to all the evidence, insists that David is NOT the author here! We do not hesitate to say that that is ridiculous.

Every weapon in the arsenal of criticism is forced into action against this psalm. Briggs called it, "A composite,"[7] finding two separate compositions and a "fragment" (Psalms 144:1-15). However, Spurgeon's view on this is correct. He wrote, "The whole psalm is perfect as it stands. It exhibits such unity that it is literary vandalism as well as a spiritual crime to rend away one part from another."[8]

Psalms 144:1-4

"Blessed be Jehovah my rock,

Who teacheth my hands to war,

And my fingers to fight:

My lovingkindness, and my fortress;

My high tower, and my deliverer,

My shield, and he in whom I take refuge;

Who subdueth my people under me.

Jehovah, what is man, that thou takest knowledge of him?

Or the son of man, that thou makest account of him?

Man is like to vanity:

His days are as a shadow that passeth away."

"My rock ... lovingkindness ... fortress ... high tower ... deliverer ... shield ... refuge" (Psalms 144:1-2).. All of these metaphors for God are used frequently in the Davidic psalms, as we have often noted.

"Who teacheth ... to war ... to fight" (Psalms 144:1). This acknowledges on David's part that God had instructed and helped him in the long struggles that had brought him to the throne and preserved him through the rebellion of Absalom.

"Who subdueth my people under me" (Psalms 144:2). This speaks of a period of tranquillity in the kingdom. The rebellion had been ruthlessly put down; its leaders were dead; its armies had been defeated with the slaughter of tens of thousands of them; and the people were then content to settle down and enjoy the prosperity of David's kingship.

The whole paragraph here (Psalms 144:1-4) was paraphrased by Delitzsch: "Praise be to Jahve who teaches me to fight and conquer (Psalms 144:1-2), me, the feeble mortal who am strong only `in Him' (Psalms 144:3-4)."[9]

Baigent also has a beautiful word on this paragraph:

"Such martial skills and exploits as he (David) achieved are gratefully traced back to God, their only source. `Every virtue' he possesses, and `every victory won' are God's alone. He is a kindred spirit of Paul, who wrote, `By the grace of God, I am what I am.' (1 Corinthians 15:16).[10]

"Psalms 144:2 here has marked resemblances to Psalms 18:2, but there are peculiar and original touches which indicate the author, and not the copyist."[11]


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James Burton Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.

Bibliography
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Psalms 144:1". "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/psalms-144.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Blessed be the Lord my strength,.... The author and giver of his natural strength of body, and of the fortitude of his mind, and of all the spiritual strength he had, to exercise grace, to bear up under afflictions and trials, to perform duty, and withstand enemies. It may be applied to Christ, the antitype of David, the man of God's right hand, he has made strong for himself. It may be rendered, "my rock"F3צורי "rupes mea", Montanus, Tigurine version, Junius & Tremellius, Piscator, &c. so Ainsworth. ; to whom the psalmist fled for shelter, when in distress and overwhelmed; and on whom he built his faith, and hope of eternal salvation, as well as depended on him for all supplies of grace and strength, and for help and succour in all times of need. The Septuagint, Vulgate Latin, Ethiopic, and Arabic versions, render it, "my God": and so the word "rock" is used for God, Deuteronomy 32:30;

which teacheth my hands to war, and my fingers to fight; he took him from being a shepherd, and made him a soldier; and from being the leader of a flock of sheep, to be a general of armies; and all his military skill in marshalling of troops, in leading them on to battle, and bringing them off as well as all his courage and success, were from the Lord: he whose hands and fingers had been used to the shepherd's crook, and to the handling of the harp and lyre, were taught how to handle the sword, the bow, the shield, and spear. God is a man of war himself; and he teaches the art of war, as he does husbandry and other things; see Exodus 15:3; and so the Lord furnishes his people, who are here in a militant state, with spiritual armour, to fight against their spiritual enemies; he teaches them how to put it on, and directs them how to make use of every piece of it; as well as gives them boldness to face their enemies, and victory over them.


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Psalms 144:1". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/psalms-144.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

"[A Psalm] of David." Blessed [be] the LORD my strength, which a teacheth my hands to war, [and] my fingers to fight:

(a) Who out of a poor shepherd has made a valiant warrior and mighty conqueror.

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Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Psalms 144:1". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/psalms-144.html. 1599-1645.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

1.Blessed be Jehovah, my strength (257) It is very evident that David, since he celebrates the favor of God in such high terms, had not only obtained the kingdom, but gained signal victories. When he calls God his strength, he acknowledges that any courage he had was given him from above, not only because he had been made from a country shepherd a mighty warrior, but because the constancy and perseverance he had shown was signally a gift from God. This term answers better than were we to translate it rock; for, by way of explanation, he adds immediately afterwards, that he had been formed under God’s teaching for war. The words certainly imply an acknowledgment, that though of a warlike spirit, he was not born for warlike enterprises but needed to undergo a change. What kind of a commencement, for example, did he show in the case of Goliah? That attempt would have been preposterous on any other supposition than his being upheld by secret divine support, so as to be independent of mere human help. (1 Samuel 17:40.)


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Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Psalms 144:1". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/psalms-144.html. 1840-57.

James Nisbet's Church Pulpit Commentary

‘IF GOD BE FOR ME, WHO CAN BE AGAINST ME?’

‘Blessed be the Lord my strength, which teacheth my hands to war, and my fingers to fight.’

Psalms 144:1

I am far from thinking that this sentence applies exclusively to what we designate spiritual conflicts. I should suppose whoever the writer of the Psalm was, gave thanks that he had been able to fight with the Philistines and the Ammonites. No one who had learned Jewish history by heart would attempt an artificial division between national wars and spiritual wars. The first supposed the last; the visible enemy was permitted to put forth his strength that the spiritual strength which was dormant might be called forth to withstand him. Man is made for battle. His inclination is to take his ease; it is God who will not let him sink into the slumber which he counts so pleasant, and which is so sure to end in a freezing death.

I. I have spoken of this thanksgiving as of universal application; there are some cases in which we shrink from using it, and yet in which we are taught by experience how much better we should be if we dared to use it in all its force and breadth. There are those who feel much more than others the power of that first enemy of which I have spoken. To withstand the lusts of the flesh is with them, through constitution, or education, or indulgence, such an effort as their nearest friends may know nothing of. What help then may be drawn from the words, ‘Blessed be the Lord God, who has taught my hands to war, and my fingers to fight’!

II. Violent desires or passions remind us of their presence.—The fashion of the world is hemming us in and holding us down without our knowing it. A web composed of invisible threads is enclosing us. It is not by some distinct influence that we are pressed, but by an atmosphere full of influences of the most mixed quality, hard to separate from each other. ‘Blessed be the Lord God of Israel, who stirs the hands to war, and the fingers to fight,’ for the Divine order which He has established, and not man. Blessed be that Lord God for not allowing His creature, His child, to lie buried under the weight of opinions, maxims, traditions, which is crushing him; for giving him visions of a city which has foundations, of which He is the Builder and Maker; for giving Him the assurance that he may, and that he must, beat down all obstacles that hinder him from possessing its glorious privileges.

III. Least of all is there any natural energy in us to contend against that enemy who is described in Scripture as going about seeking whom he may devour.—Is it not true that the time which boasts to have outlived the evil spirit is the one which is most directly exposed to his assaults? May it not be that our progress has brought us into a closer conflict with the spiritual wickedness in high places than our forefathers were ever engaged in? Blessed be the Lord God of Israel, who teacheth our hands to war, and our fingers to fight. Blessed be He for bringing us into immediate encounter with His own immediate enemies, that so we may know more than others did of His own immediate presence.

Rev. F. D. Maurice.


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Bibliography
Nisbet, James. "Commentary on Psalms 144:1". Church Pulpit Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cpc/psalms-144.html. 1876.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Psalms 144:1 « [A Psalm] of David. » Blessed [be] the LORD my strength, which teacheth my hands to war, [and] my fingers to fight:

A Psalm of David] The Greek addeth, against Goliath; and the Chaldee, for the hurtful sword, Psalms 144:10, hath Goliath’s sword.

Ver. 1. Blessed be the Lord my strength] See Psalms 18:1, and observe how this psalm suiteth with that.

Which teacheth my hands] Used to the hook and harp, and not to the sword and spear; but God hath apted and abled them to feats of arms, and warlike exploits. It is God that giveth skill and success, saith Solomon, Proverbs 8:1-36, wisdom and ability, saith Daniel, Daniel 2:19-23 And as in the spiritual warfare, so here, our weapons are mighty through God, 2 Corinthians 10:4, who promiseth that no weapon formed against his people shall prosper, Isaiah 54:17.


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Psalms 144:1". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/psalms-144.html. 1865-1868.

Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary

CONTENTS

This Psalm hath much in it concerning Christ. If we read it wholly with reference to him and his church, we shall find it to be a very delightful hymn, suited to the times of the gospel.

A Psalm of David.


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Bibliography
Hawker, Robert, D.D. "Commentary on Psalms 144:1". "Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/pmc/psalms-144.html. 1828.

Sermon Bible Commentary

Psalms 144:1

I am far from thinking that this sentence applies exclusively to what we designate spiritual conflicts. I should suppose that David, or whoever the writer of the Psalm was, gave thanks that he had been able to fight with the Philistines and the Ammonites. No one who had learned Jewish history by heart would attempt an artificial division between national wars and spiritual wars. The first supposed the last; the visible enemy was permitted to put forth his strength that the spiritual strength which was dormant might be called forth to withstand him. Man is made for battle. His inclination is to take his ease; it is God who will not let him sink into the slumber which he counts so pleasant, and which is so sure to end in a freezing death.

I. I have spoken of this thanksgiving as of universal application; there are some cases in which we shrink from using it, and yet in which we are taught by experience how much better we should be if we dared to use it in all its force and breadth. There are those who feel much more than others the power of that first enemy of which I have spoken. To withstand the lusts of the flesh, not to be completely overpowered by them, is with them, through constitution, or education, or indulgence, such an effort as their nearest friends may know nothing of. What help then may be drawn from the words, "Blessed be the Lord God, who has taught my hands to war, and my fingers to fight"!

II. Violent desires or passions remind us of their presence. The fashion of the world is hemming us in and holding us down without our knowing it. A web composed of invisible threads is enclosing us. It is not by some distinct influence that we are pressed, but by an atmosphere full of influences of the most mixed quality, hard to separate from each other. "Blessed be the Lord God of Israel, who stirs the hands to war, and the fingers to fight," for the Divine order which He has established, and not man. Blessed be that Lord God for not allowing His creature, His child, to lie buried under the weight of opinions, maxims, traditions, which is crushing him; for giving him visions of a city which has foundations, of which He is the Builder and Maker; for giving him the assurance that he may, and that he must, beat down all obstacles that hinder him from possessing its glorious privileges.

III. Least of all is there any natural energy in us to contend against that enemy who is described in Scripture as going about seeking whom he may devour. Is it not true that the time which boasts to have outlived the evil spirit is the one which is most directly exposed to his assaults? May it not be that our progress has brought us into a closer conflict with the spiritual wickedness in high places than our forefathers were ever engaged in? Blessed be the Lord God of Israel, who teacheth our hands to war, and our fingers to fight. Blessed be He for bringing us into immediate encounter with His own immediate enemies, that so we may know more than others did of His own immediate presence.

F. D. Maurice, Sermons, vol. i., p. 317.


References: Psalms 144:4.—R. W. Evans, Parochial Sermons, vol. i., p. 162, and vol. ill., p. 133. Psalms 144:5.—S. Baring-Gould, Village Preaching for a Year, vol. ii., p. 88.


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Bibliography
Nicoll, William R. "Commentary on Psalms 144:1". "Sermon Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/sbc/psalms-144.html.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Psalms 144.

David blesseth God for his mercy: he prayeth that God would powerfully deliver him from his enemies: he promiseth to praise God: he prayeth for the happy estate of the kingdom.

A Psalm of David.

Title. לדוד ledavid. This is evidently a psalm of triumph, probably upon the same occasion with the 118th. I guess so, says Mudge, partly from the particular deliverance of David from the evil sword of Ishbibenob; and partly for that it seems to be a victory over the Philistines, (for them I take to be the sons of the stranger, as the LXX. calls them αλλοφυλοι ; and being in a manner mixed with the sons of Israel, it was natural by way of distinction to call them so;) who by their everlasting wars against Saul and David, certainly in breach of treaties, seem to be truly characterised by persons whose mouth speaketh falsehood, &c. From the victory the author takes occasion to describe the happiness of those people who live under the protection of God.

Psalms 144:1. Which teacheth my hands, &c.— Who hath taught my hands; and so in Psalms 144:2. Who hath subdued, or made my people subject to my will. Green renders it, Who reduceth nations to my obedience.


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Bibliography
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Psalms 144:1". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/psalms-144.html. 1801-1803.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

PSALM 144

THE ARGUMENT

The matter of this Psalm is partly gratulatory for mercies received, and partly petitionary for further blessings. It seems to have been composed after Saul’s death, and in the beginning of David’s reign, when he was exposed to many perils, both from his own rebellions subjects, and from the Philistines and other foreign enemies, yet so that lie had a good prospect and assurance of a more complete and established felicity.

David, blesseth God for his mercy to him in his wars and government, confesseth his own and man’s nothingness, Psalms 144:1-4; prayeth that he would deliver him from his powerful enemies, Psalms 144:5-8, and promiseth to praise him, Psalms 144:9-11. The happiness of that kingdom whose God is the Lord, Psalms 144:12-15.

Who has given me that skill in military conduct, and that dexterity in the management of my weapons, which was wholly unsuitable to and much above my education and former course of life.


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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Psalms 144:1". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/psalms-144.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

1. My strength—Hebrew, My rock, but clearly in a broad and figurative sense.


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Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Psalms 144:1". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/psalms-144.html. 1874-1909.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Praise. The remaining seven psalms relate to the praises of God, to intimate that this occupation ought to be our glory, both in time and in eternity, as all were created for that purpose. (Ven. Bede) --- This is the seventh of the alphabetical psalms, the four last of which are only recognized by St. Jerome as perfect. See Psalm xxiv., xxxiii., xxxvi., cx., cxi., and cxviii. Yet here the ver 14., which should commence with N, is wanting in Hebrew, though it was probably there at first, as it is in the Greek and Latin, (Worthington) as well as in the Syriac and Arabic. (Calmet) --- Hence it appears, that our versions ought not always to be corrected by the Hebrew, which might be rendered more perfect by a collation with them. (Worthington) --- The Jews assert, that whoever reads this psalm thrice-a-day, may be sure of obtaining heaven, provided, says Kimchi, that his heart accompany his words. The new baptized used to recite it in thanksgiving, for having received the body and blood of Christ. (St. Chrysostom) --- Ferrand supposes that his psalm was composed after the captivity. But there seems to be no ground for this supposition, and the author had probably no particular event in view. (Calmet) --- My king. On whom I entirely depend. (Berthier) --- And ever. St. Jerome, "and after," (Haydock) both in time and in eternity. Christ is styled king,, to whom the nations were promised; (Psalm ii.) and David gives the highest honour to the blessed Trinity. (Worthington) --- David still praises God by the mouths of the faithful, as also in heaven.


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Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Psalms 144:1". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/psalms-144.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

Title, of David = by David. The Septuagint adds "concerning Goliath." This may be because Psalm 8, which relates to David and Goliath, has the same words in Psalms 8:4 as in Psalms 144:3. In any case, Psalm 144 is peculiarly appropriate to David"s victory (1 Samuel 17). Not a "compilation" of "fragments" of some "lost Psalms", but a perfect whole with a perfect design, as shown by the Structure.

Blessed. Figure of Speech Benedictio (App-6.). Not Beatitudo as in Psalms 144:15.

the LORD. Hebrew. Jehovah. App-4.

strength = rock, or fortress. Compare Deuteronomy 32:4. 1 Samuel 2:2; 2 Samuel 22:47. 2 Samuel 18:2, 2 Samuel 18:31, 2 Samuel 18:46; 2 Samuel 19:14; 2 Samuel 28:1; 2 Samuel 62:2, 2 Samuel 62:6.

to war . . . to fight. Not merely generally, but specially in the case of Goliath (1Sa 17). See Title.


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Psalms 144:1". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/psalms-144.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Blessed be the LORD my strength, which teacheth my hands to war, and my fingers to fight:

Psalms 144:1-15.-Blessed be Yahweh, my strength, in subduing my enemies (Psalms 144:1-2). How marvelous that thou shouldest regard frail man! (Psalms 144:2; Psalms 144:4). Bow thy heavens and come down to save me (Psalms 144:5-8). I will praise thee already for salvation anticipated by faith (Psalms 144:9-10). Rid me from strange children who speak vanity, that our children may be as vigorous plants and as polished stones (Psalms 144:11-12); that abundant stores may be ours, and no complainings (Psalms 144:13-14); Epiphonema: Happy are they whose God is Yahweh (Psalms 144:15). David herein applies much of the 18th psalm in a new relation. The grateful review there of God's mercies to himself is in the first part here applied to the edification of his seed and nation. This is the transition psalm from the Prayer-Psalms 138:1-8; Psalms 139:1-24; Psalms 140:1-13; Psalms 141:1-10; Psalms 142:1-7; Psalms 143:1-12; Psalms 144:1-15; Psalms 145:1-21 to the concluding Praise-Psalms 145:1-21. Cf Psalms 144:9-10.

Blessed be the Lord my strength - Hebrew, my rock; from Psalms 18:2; Psalms 18:31; Psalms 18:46. Which teacheth my hands to war, and my fingers to fight - from Psalms 18:34. It is not merely David, but David's seed and the elect nation that say so. In Psalms 144:1-2 David sets forth God's relations to him; and on this and God's condescension he grounds the prayer (Psalms 144:5) that God would deliver him and his seed, according to the promise in 2 Samuel 7:1-29.


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Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Psalms 144:1". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/psalms-144.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(1) Strength.—Rather, rock. Comp. Psalms 18:2; Psalms 18:46. LXX. and Vulg., “my God.”

Which teacheth.—See Psalms 18:34. More literally,

“Who traineth my hands for war,

My fingers for fight.”


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Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Psalms 144:1". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/psalms-144.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Blessed be the LORD my strength, which teacheth my hands to war, and my fingers to fight:
(Title
&) A Psalm of David. Calmet and others think that this Psalm was composed by David after the death of Absalom; and from a collation of it with Ps 18, in which the same ideas and form of expression occur, there can be no doubt of both having proceeded from the same pen, and that David was the author.
my strength
Heb. my rock.
18:2,31; 71:3; 95:1; Deuteronomy 32:30,31; Isaiah 26:4; *marg:; Isaiah 45:24
teacheth
18:34; 44:3,4; 60:12; 2 Samuel 22:35; 2 Corinthians 10:4; Ephesians 6:10,11
to war
or, to the war, etc.

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Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Psalms 144:1". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/psalms-144.html.

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