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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Psalms 144:14

 

 

Let our cattle bear Without mishap and without loss, Let there be no outcry in our streets!

Adam Clarke Commentary

Our oxen may be strong to labor - We have not only an abundance of cattle; but they are of the most strong and vigorous breed.

No breaking in - So well ordered is the police of the kingdom, that there are no depredations, no robbers, house-breakers, or marauding parties, in the land; no sudden incursions of neighboring tribes or banditti breaking into fields or houses, carrying away property, and taking with them the people to sell them into captivity: there is no such breaking in, and no such going out, in the nation. My enemies are either become friends, and are united with me in political interests; or are, through fear, obliged to stand aloof.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Psalms 144:14". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/psalms-144.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

That our oxen may be strong to labour - Margin, “able to bear burdens;” or, “laden with flesh.” The Hebrew is simply loaded or laden: that is, with a burden; or, with flesh; or, as Gesenius renders it, with young. The latter idea would best suit the connection - that of cattle producing abundantly or multiplying.

That there be no breaking in, nor going out - No breaking in of other cattle into enclosed grounds, and no escape of those which are shut up for pasture. That property may be safe everywhere. The image is that of security, peace, order, prosperity.

That there be no complaining in our streets - literally, “outcry; clamor.” That the land may be at peace; that order and law may be observed; that the rights of all may be respected; that among neighbors there may be no strifes and contentions.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Psalms 144:14". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/psalms-144.html. 1870.

The Biblical Illustrator

Psalms 144:14

That there be no complaining in our streets.

English pauperism

English pauperism is a peculiar product of this island. You see nothing like it anywhere else. Those who have heard me speak on this topic know what an essential difference I draw between pauperism and poverty. Poverty is a relative term. Man may be poor, and yet may be healthy and very happy, and may not need your sympathy. But pauperism describes the conditions of those unhappy fellow-citizens of ours in such wretched circumstances that it is absolutely impossible for them to maintain themselves and their families in health and decency. Now, this kind of extreme poverty or pauperism is quite different from anything that you witness anywhere else. As a distinguished minister of my own church, Dr. Rigg, said a quarter of a century, ago, in a book which he published on the subject of Education, English pauperism is “a national institution, a legacy from mediaeval times and dregs of an outworn feudalism.” In other words, the peculiar pauperism which exists in this country arises from the fact that the people have been divorced from the soil. (H. P. Hughes, M. A.)

Remedy for pauperism

Many who have no sympathy with abstract committees would be delighted to help particular cases. If any such committee were able to put affluent men and women into direct relations with some starving families, it would be a great gain every way. This suggestion is not novel. It was made five years ago by a gentleman at the second conference we ever held. Suppose we could get every household represented here to look after one destitute household. Instead of giving their charity here and there, suppose I could introduce you to one family--husband, wife, and children--all in great need of work. You could in various ways assist with practical sympathy and advice as well as with money. I do not know how many families there are likely to be out of work. Suppose 20,000 or 30,000 are in this condition, and suppose I could get 20,000 or 30,000 men and women to undertake to be a real friend to one family each, it would not be a great strain upon their purse or time, and it would be an untold blessing. Oh, that we could do something to bring together into direct personal contact the unprivileged and the privileged! Their separation is the root of the want of social sympathy between them. But let me say that many of those who seem to be the most remote from the poor are deeply touched by their condition, and are extremely anxious to help them. And I think the way suggested by Mr. Arnold White is one of the most effectual. Further, it will be found that if we could only prevent the pauperism occasioned by intemperance, there would scarcely be any pauperism left. (H. P. Hughes, M. A.)


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Bibliography
Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "Psalms 144:14". The Biblical Illustrator. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/psalms-144.html. 1905-1909. New York.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

That our oxen may be strong to labour,.... To draw carriages, to plough with, and to tread out the corn: or "may be burdened"F23מסבלים "onusti", Pagninus, Montanus, Gejerus; "onerarii", so some in Vatablus; "onerati", Schmidt; "loden", Ainsworth, ; fit to carry burdens; or burdened with flesh, be plump and fat, and in good condition to work; or burdened with young, as someF24So Bochart. Hierozoic. par. 1. l. 2. c. 295. understand it, and then it must be meant of cows, as the word is used, Deuteronomy 7:13; and so here an increase of kine is wished for, as of sheep before. Ministers of the word are compared to oxen for their patience in suffering, and their laboriousness in working, 1 Corinthians 9:9, 1 Timothy 5:17; and happy is it for the churches of Christ when their ministers are laborious ones; are strong to labour, and do labour, in the word and doctrine; stand fast in the faith, and quit themselves like men, and are strong;

that there be no breaking in: of the enemy into the land to invade it, into cities and houses to plunder and spoil them;

nor going out: of the city to meet the enemy and fight with him, peace and not war is desirable; or no going out of one's nation into captivity into a foreign country, as Kimchi; or no breaking in to folds and herds, and leading out and driving away cattle, to the loss of the owners thereof. SomeF25lbid. understand both these of abortion, of any violent rupture of the womb, and an immature birth;

that there be no complaining in our streets; on account of famine, pestilence, the sword, violence, and oppression; or no cryingF26צוחה "clamor", Pagninus, Montanus, Tigurine version, Musculus, Cocceius, Gejerus, Michaelis. , no mournful cry or howling and shrieking on account of the enemy being at hand, and just ready to enter in, or being there, killing, plundering, and spoiling.


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
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Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Psalms 144:14". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/psalms-144.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

[That] our m oxen [may be] strong to labour; [that there be] no breaking in, nor going out; that [there be] no complaining in our streets.

(m) He attributes not only the great conveniences, but even the least also to God's favour.

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Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Psalms 144:14". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/psalms-144.html. 1599-1645.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

That our oxen may be strong to labour; that there be no breaking in, nor going out; that there be no complaining in our streets.

Breaking in — Of enemies invading the land, or assaulting our cities, and making breaches in their walls.

Going out — Of our people, either out of the cities to fight with an invading enemy: or out of the land into captivity.


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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Psalms 144:14". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/psalms-144.html. 1765.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

14.Our oxen, etc. The Hebrew word סבל, sabal, is properly to carry. Accordingly some understand מסובלים, mesubbalim, to mean robust, (274) as unless they were strong oxen they would not be fit for carriage, or bearing burdens. Others think they are spoken of as laden with fat. There is no need for insisting upon this point, as it does not affect the main scope of the passage. It may be more important to notice, that God’s fatherly care of his people is celebrated on the account that he condescends to attend to every the smallest matter which concerns their advantage. As in the verse before he had ascribed the fruitfulness of the herds and flocks to God’s goodness, so now the fattening of their oxen, to show that there is nothing relating to us here which he overlooks. As it would signify little to have abundance of everything unless we could enjoy it, he takes notice of it as another part of the Lord’s kindness that the people were peaceable and quiet. By breach I have no doubt that he alludes to hostile incursions, that there was no enemy to break in upon them through demolished gates or walls. By goings out it is surprising that any should understand exile, that the people were not torn away from the bounds of their native country. All he means simply is, in my opinion, that there was no necessity of sallying out to repel an enemy, none offering violence or molestation. To the same effect is the expression, as to any crying in the streets, the effect of a sudden tumult. The meaning is, accordingly, that there was no disturbance in the cities, because God kept enemies at a distance.


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Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Psalms 144:14". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/psalms-144.html. 1840-57.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Psalms 144:14 [That] our oxen [may be] strong to labour; [that there be] no breaking in, nor going out; that [there be] no complaining in our streets.

Ver. 14. Nor going out] viz. To encounter the enemy, or to be led into captivity.

No complaining] No outcries but harvest homes.


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Psalms 144:14". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/psalms-144.html. 1865-1868.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

To labour, Heb. laden, either with flesh and fat, as many understand it; or, as others, with young: but then the foregoing word is not to be rendered

oxen, but cows, as the same word and in the same masculine gender is used Deuteronomy 7:13. And so this agrees best with the former prayer for the sheep, Psalms 144:13, and he wisheth the same blessing of fruitfulness both for greater and smaller cattle.

No breaking in, to wit, of enemies invading the land, or assaulting our cities, and making breaches in their walls.

Nor going out, to wit, of our people; either out of the towns and cities, to fight with an invading enemy; or out of the land into captivity.

No complaining; or, no outcry, or howling, for any sad tidings, or public grievances or calamities.


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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Psalms 144:14". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/psalms-144.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

14. Breaking in, is in Hebrew only “breaking,” and refers to damage or painful casualty; while going out is loss or failure. These verses follow beautifully Psalms 144:11, and continue its prayer; portraying in few words a copious prosperity, such as a king might wish for his people.


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Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Psalms 144:14". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/psalms-144.html. 1874-1909.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Lifteth. Hebrew, "upholdeth all who are falling." (Haydock) --- No one can stand or rise without God. (Berthier) --- He is ready to lift up every one. (Worthington)


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Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Psalms 144:14". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/psalms-144.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

strong to labour = well laden.

no breaking in = no invasion.

nor going out = no captivity.


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Psalms 144:14". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/psalms-144.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

That our oxen may be strong to labour; that there be no breaking in, nor going out; that there be no complaining in our streets.

That our oxen may be strong to labour - literally, 'strong to bear burdens' (Muis, from Kimchi) (1 Chronicles 12:40). Heavily laden oxen imply that there is a rich produce for them to bear. The Hebrew for oxen implies trained oxen [ 'aluwp (Hebrew #441), from 'aalap (Hebrew #502), to learn]. Its meaning is also a leader. It is applied to the dukes of Edom (Genesis 36:1-43), and after the captivity, by Zechariah, to governors (Zechariah 9:7; Zechariah 12:5-6). But there is no ground for the forced translation of Maurer, etc., 'that our leaders may be erect' (a sense of the adjective unsanctioned by the Hebrew). 'Yoke oxen' are naturally named after "sheep."

That there be no breaking in, nor going out - no irruption into the folds, no going out of cattle or sheep, carried away by the plunderer. Hengstenberg translates, 'no breach' (Judges 21:15; 2 Samuel 6:8). 'No misfortune whereby the entireness of our felicity is rent.' 'No going out' means no loss.

That there be no complaining in our streets - literally, no cry; namely, over breach or loss (Isaiah 24:11).


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Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Psalms 144:14". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/psalms-144.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(14) This verse is full of obscurities. The words rendered “oxen, strong to labour,” can hardly bear this meaning with the present pointing, since the participle is passive, and there is no authority for rendering oxen bearing burdens. The words have been rendered oxen laden, either with the produce of the land, or with their own fat (so apparently the LXX.), or with young, pregnant—all open to the objection that the passive of to bear must mean “to be borne,” and the latter to the further objection that the words are in the masculine. But since allûphîm elsewhere means “heads of families” (Jeremiah 13:21, &c) or “princes,” and the noun cognate with the verb is used of a post connected with the revenue (1 Kings 11:28; comp. the connection between the Greek ϕορός and ϕέρτερος), the participle passive may easily here mean “honoured,” or “high in office.” Or, from the use of the cognate Chaldee form in Ezra 6:3, “strongly laid,” we might render, our princes firmly established; and this is the best explanation of the passage.

No breaking in.—Heb., a “breach,” i.e., in the town walls. LXX. and Vulg., “no falling of the fence.” Others refer to the folds for cattle. (See Psalms 60:2.) Ewald, however, connecting closely with the mention of “pregnant oxen,” renders no abortion. So Syriac: “Our cattle are great (with young), and there is not a barren one among them.”

Nor going out—i.e., either to war, or into captivity (Prayer Book version), or the breaking out of cattle. The first is the more probable.

Complaining.—Rather, outcry, cry of sorrow, as in Jeremiah 14:2; or possibly, cry of battle.

Streets.—Better, squares.


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Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Psalms 144:14". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/psalms-144.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

That our oxen may be strong to labour; that there be no breaking in, nor going out; that there be no complaining in our streets.
strong to labour
Heb. able to bear burdens, or loaden with flesh. no breaking in.
Deuteronomy 28:7,25; Judges 5:8; 6:3,6; 1 Samuel 13:17-23; 31:7; Jeremiah 13:17-19; 14:18; Lamentations 1:4-6; Zechariah 8:3-5

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Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Psalms 144:14". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/psalms-144.html.

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