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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Psalms 144:3

 

 

O LORD, what is man, that You take knowledge of him? Or the son of man, that You think of him?

Adam Clarke Commentary

Lord, what is man - See the notes on Psalm 8:4, Psalm 8:5. What is Adam, that thou approvest of him? Can he do any thing worthy of thy notice? Or the son of feeble perishing man, that thou shouldest hold him in repute? What care, love, and attention, dost thou lavish upon him!


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Psalms 144:3". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/psalms-144.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Lord, what is man, that thou takest knowledge of him? - The sentiment here is the same as in Psalm 8:4, though the language is not precisely the same. See the notes at that passage. The word rendered “that thou takest knowledge of him,” means here to take notice of; to regard. The idea is, It is amazing that a being so insignificant as man should be an object of interest to God, or that One so great should pay any attention to him and to his affairs. In Psalm 8:4, the language is “that thou art mindful of him,” that is, that thou dost remember him - that thou dost not altogether pass him over. In Psalm 8:1-9 the remark is made in view of the heavens as being so exalted in comparison with man, and the wonder is, that in view of worlds so vast occupying the divine attention, and needing the divine care, “man,” so insignificant, does not pass out of his view altogether. Here the remark seems to be made in illustration of the idea that there is no strength in man; that he has no power to accomplish anything of himself; that he is entirely dependent on God.

Or the son of man - Man - any of the race. See the notes at Psalm 8:4.

That thou makest account of him! - Psalm 8:4, “that thou visitest him.” See the notes at that passage. The word here means “that thou shouldest “think” of him,” that he should ever come into thy thought at all.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Psalms 144:3". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/psalms-144.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Lord, what is man, that thou takest knowledge of him?.... Man, that is at most and best but a creature, made of the dust of the earth, is but dust and ashes; yea, a sinful creature, that drinks up iniquity like water: and yet the Lord not only knows him, as he is the omniscient God, but takes notice of him in a way of providence, and in a way of grace. His chosen people are no other nor better than others, of the same original, and of the same character; and yet he owns and acknowledges them as his peculiar people, and makes himself known unto them: and so it is rendered by the Septuagint version, "that thou shouldest be known unto him?" or, "appear to him?" as the Arabic; reveal thyself to him, not only by the light of nature and works of creation, but in Christ, and by the spirit of wisdom and revelation in the knowledge of him;

or the son of man, that thou makest account of him? as the Lord does, especially of some of the sons of men; whom he reckons as his portion and inheritance, his jewels and peculiar treasure, and who are as dear to him as the apple of his eye; whom he "magnifies", as in Job 7:17; makes them kings and priests; raises them from the dunghill, and sets them among princes, to inherit the throne of glory; on whom he sets his heart, and loves them with an everlasting love: or, "that thou shouldest think of him?"F7ותחשבהו "quod cogites de eo", Tigurine version, Vatablus. thoughts of peace, and not of evil; so as to provide a Saviour for men, and send down the Spirit of his Son into their hearts to quicken them; so as to bless them with all spiritual blessings, and at last to glorify them. David no doubt had a special respect to himself; and wondered at the goodness of God to him, in taking him from a family of little or no account, from a mean employ, from a shepherd's cottage, and raising him to the throne of Israel; and especially in making him a partaker of grace, and an heir of glory; see Psalm 8:4; which is applied to Christ, Hebrews 2:6.


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Psalms 144:3". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/psalms-144.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

LORD, what [is] man, that thou c takest knowledge of him! [or] the son of man, that thou makest account of him!

(c) To give to God just praise, is to confess ourselves to be unworthy of so excellent benefits, and that he bestows them on us of his free mercy.

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Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Psalms 144:3". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/psalms-144.html. 1599-1645.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

3.O Jehovah! what is man, etc. He amplifies the goodness shown by God by instituting a comparison. Having declared how singularly he had been dealt with, he turns his eyes inward, and asks, “Who am I, that God should show me such condescension? “He speaks of man in general; only the circumstance is noticeable that he commends the mercy of God, by considering his lowly and abject condition. In other places he mentions grounds of humiliation of a more personal or private nature, — here he confines himself to what has reference to our common nature; and though even in discussing the nature of man there are other reasons he might have specified why he is unworthy of the regard and love of God, he briefly adverts to his being like the smoke, and as a shadow. (259) We are left to infer that the riches of the divine goodness are extended to objects altogether unworthy in themselves. We are warned, when apt at any time to forget ourselves, and think we are something when we are nothing, that the simple fact of the shortness of our life should put down all arrogance and pride. The Scriptures, in speaking of the frailty of man, comprehend whatever is necessarily connected with it. And, indeed, if our life vanish in a moment, what is there stable about us? We taught this truth also — that we cannot properly estimate the divine goodness, unless we take into consideration what we are as to our condition, as we can only ascribe to God what is due unto him, by acknowledging that his goodness is bestowed upon undeserving creatures. The reader may seek for further information upon this point in the eighth Psalm, where nearly the same truth is insisted upon.


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Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Psalms 144:3". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/psalms-144.html. 1840-57.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Psalms 144:3 LORD, what [is] man, that thou takest knowledge of him! [or] the son of man, that thou makest account of him!

Ver. 3. Lord, what is man?] What am I, that thou shouldest do all this for me? or, what is the strongest man alive, when such a giant as Goliath so suddenly and easily is slain by me?

That thou makest account of him?] Tantus tantillos et tales, saith a Father.


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Psalms 144:3". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/psalms-144.html. 1865-1868.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Lord, what is man he aggravates God’s goodness to him, expressed Psalms 144:2, by the consideration of his own meanness. Though I am king over my people, yet, alas, I am but a man. a base, sinful, mortal, and miserable creature; if compared with thee, less than nothing and vanity.

Takest knowledge of him, i.e. hast any care and kindness for him, as words of knowledge commonly imply in Scripture.

Makest account of him; the same thing repeated in other words.


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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Psalms 144:3". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/psalms-144.html. 1685.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

End. Hebrew, "finding out," because he is infinite. (Berthier) (Job v. 9.)


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Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Psalms 144:3". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/psalms-144.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

what . . . ? Figure of speech Erotesis. App-6. Compare Psalms 8:4.

man. Hebrew. "adam. App-14.

Greek. This word is read in some codices, with one early printed edition.

man. Hebrew. "enosh. App-14.


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Psalms 144:3". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/psalms-144.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

LORD, what is man, that thou takest knowledge of him! or the son of man, that thou makest account of him!

Lord, what is man, that thou takest knowledge (i:e., notice) of him! Or the son of man, (Hebrew, Enosh, mortal man: note, Psalms 8:4) that thou makest account of him! - from Psalms 8:4. David is lost in adoring wonder at the grace which lavishes such loving-kindness on one so frail and insignificant. So 2 Samuel 7:18-19; Isaiah 55:8.


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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Psalms 144:3". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/psalms-144.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(3) See Psalms 8:4.


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Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Psalms 144:3". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/psalms-144.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

LORD, what is man, that thou takest knowledge of him! or the son of man, that thou makest account of him!
what is man
8:4; Job 7:17; 15:14; Hebrews 2:6
or the son
146:3,4

Copyright Statement
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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Psalms 144:3". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/psalms-144.html.

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