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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Psalms 146:2

 

 

I will praise the LORD while I live; I will sing praises to my God while I have my being.

Adam Clarke Commentary

While I live will I praise - The true feeling of a heart overpowered with a sense of God's goodness.

While I have any being - בעודי beodi, in my continuance, in my progression, my eternal existence. This is very expressive.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Psalms 146:2". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/psalms-146.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

While I live will I praise the Lord … - See the notes at Psalm 104:33, where the same language occurs substantially as in this verse: “I will sing unto the Lord as long as I live; I will sing praise to my God while I have my being.” The idea is, not merely that he would praise him during this life - short and fleeting as it is - but that as long as he had an existence - in the future world - forever he would praise him.

Through every period of my life

Thy goodness I‘ll pursue;

And after death, in distant worlds,

The glorious theme renew.

Through all eternity to Thee

A joyful song I‘ll raise;

But, oh! eternity‘s too short

To utter all thy praise.”

- Addison


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Psalms 146:2". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/psalms-146.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

While I live will I praise the Lord,.... As he had good reason to do, since he had his life from him, and was upheld in it by him; who also favoured him with the mercies and comforts of life; and that every day, being renewed to him every morning, and continued all the days of his life; which determined him throughout the whole of it to praise the Lord: nay, he had his spiritual life from him, with all the blessings of it; which are lasting, everlasting ones, and had hope of eternal life with him;

I will sing praises unto my God while I have any being; or "while I am"F12בעודי "dum fuero", Pagninus; "in adhuc me", Montanus; "quamdiu ero", Cocceius; εως υπαρχω, Sept. "quamdiu sum", Schmidt, Ethiopic version; so Ainsworth. ; not only in this world, but in the world to come; for men have a being or existence after death, and the saints have a most comfortable and happy one then; and will be more capable of singing praises to their incarnate God, and which will be their work to all eternity; see Psalm 104:33.


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Psalms 146:2". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/psalms-146.html. 1999.

James Nisbet's Church Pulpit Commentary

THE PRAISE BOOK OF THE JEWISH CHURCH

‘I will sing praises unto my God while I have any being.’

Psalms 146:2

Consider the glory and the use of the Book of Psalms.

I. Think, first, of the rareness and preciousness of that unique gift to the Church.—The Hebrew’s characteristic was his religion, and not his literature. The Hebrew race left behind it a trophy corresponding to this characteristic. It was not a code of laws, embodying the great issues of justice, though Moses was of the seed of Abraham. It was not a volume of poetry, to whose immortal pages the centuries add imperishable beauty; at least, it was not a volume of poetry as such. It was something more unusual. If we measure the preciousness of products by their reality, then prayers are the most precious of all products. So rare and unique is the Book of Psalms.

II. Note some of the general uses of the Psalter.—(1) The Psalms bring out with unapproachable practical influence the idea of a living, personal God, the Creator, and Judge, and Friend of men; His moral character; the whole body of truths rightly or wrongly termed natural religion. (2) The Psalms bring out as nothing else can the ideal of spiritual religion. (a) They show us that religion’s exceeding great reward is in itself. (b) They tell us that man’s spiritual ideal is not in its essence formal or ceremonial. (c) They show, as a feature of the spiritual character unknown to all other religions, a deep, abiding sense of sinfulness; a holiness arising not from effort, but from conscience feeling a burden and faith laying it upon a Saviour.

III. The Psalms are a proof of the existence of the Divine world, just as music is the proof of the existence of a world of harmony.—We possess aspirations beyond our present needs. They will never read man truly who forget that he bears within a spiritual prophecy, as truly as he bears without a natural history. Of this prophecy the Psalms are the accumulated utterances. They tell us that even if the tree of humanity, embedded in the soil of myriad ages, has roots that go down lower than the ‘cabin of the savage,’ to ‘the lair of the brute,’ yet aloft it has tendrils that stretch themselves upwards towards the light of immortality. ‘I am continually with Thee; Thou hast holden me by Thy right hand.’ ‘This God is our God for ever and ever; He shall be our Guide unto death.’

—Archbishop Alexander.

Illustrations

(1) ‘Christian, fix your eye upon Christ and you will soon praise Him. Dwell upon that Lamb of God till you forget yourself and become lost in the marvellous love to you, a guilty sinner. Read the meaning of those drops of blood, of that anguished look and that bitter cry. It was all for thee. It was because He was suffering for thy sin, and that thou mightest go up to the throne of God a blood-bought, pardoned sinner! Dwell on this love till self is forgotten and praises fill thy soul.’

(2) ‘A Psalm like the 146th hardly needs the Gloria at the close to bring it fully into unison with our Christian worship. It contains a threefold three in one. It has a heart of adoration which beats in threes. Of the strange threefold vibration in the blessings and descriptions of the Old Testament the Psalter abundantly partakes.’


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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Nisbet, James. "Commentary on Psalms 146:2". Church Pulpit Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cpc/psalms-146.html. 1876.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Psalms 146:2 While I live will I praise the LORD: I will sing praises unto my God while I have any being.

Ver. 2. While I live will I praise the Lord] George Carpenter, the Bavarian martyr, being desired by some godly brethren, that when he was burning in the fire he would give them some sign of his constance, answered, Let this be a sure sign unto you of my faith and perseverance in the truth, quod usque dum os aperire, aut certe hiscere licebit, that so long as I am able to hold open my mouth, or to whisper, I will never cease to praise God, and to profess his truth. Id quod et fecit, saith mine author, that which also he did; and so did many other martyrs besides (Scultet. Annal. dec. 2, p. 110).

While I have any being] Either in this world or in the next; for then also, and much more, I shall praise God.


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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Psalms 146:2". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/psalms-146.html. 1865-1868.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

2. While I have any being—Hebrew, in my continuance. An allusion to the life after death, according to the simple and comprehensive language usually employed to set forth the idea of immortality.


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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Psalms 146:2". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/psalms-146.html. 1874-1909.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Jerusalem. After the captivity, (Worthington) or at the beginning of David's reign, when he had taken Sion, and Israel acknowledged his dominion, 2 Kings v. It may also allude to the Church, (John xi. 51.) and to heaven, Hebrews xii. 22., and Apocalypse xxi. (Berthier)


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Psalms 146:2". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/psalms-146.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

God. Hebrew. Elohim. App-4.


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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Psalms 146:2". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/psalms-146.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

While I live will I praise the LORD: I will sing praises unto my God while I have any being.

While I live will I praise the Lord; I will sing praises unto my God while I have any being - (Psalms 104:33.)


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Psalms 146:2". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/psalms-146.html. 1871-8.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

While I live will I praise the LORD: I will sing praises unto my God while I have any being.
While I live
63:4; 71:14,15; 104:33; 145:1,2; Revelation 7:9-17

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Psalms 146:2". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/psalms-146.html.

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