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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Psalms 19:6

 

 

Its rising is from one end of the heavens, And its circuit to the other end of them; And there is nothing hidden from its heat.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

His going forth - The psalmist now describes that race which he has to run, as borne over the entire circuit of the heavens, from one end of it to another - sweeping the whole space across the firmament.

Is from the end of the heaven - From one end of the heaven; that is, from the East, where he starts.

And his circuit - The word used here - תקופה teqûphâh - means properly a coming about, or a return, as of the seasons, or of the year. It is found only in Exodus 34:22, “At the year‘s end;” 1 Samuel 1:20, “When the time was come about” (Margin, in revolution of days); 2 Chronicles 24:23, “At the end of the year” (Margin, in the revolution of the year). The word here does not refer to the fact that the sun comes round to the starting-point on the following day, but to the sweep or circuit which he makes in the heavens from one end of it to the other - traveling over the entire heavens.

Unto the ends of it - That is, to the other side of the heavens. The plural term is used here perhaps from the idea of completeness, or to denote that there was nothing beyond. The complete journey was made.

And there is nothing hid from the heat thereof - The rays of the sun penetrate everywhere. Nothing escapes it. It is not a mere march for show and splendor; it is not an idle and useless journey in the heavens; but all things - vegetables, birds, beasts, men - all that lives - feel the effect of his vital warmth, and are animated by his quickening influence. Thus the sun in his goings illustrates the glory of God. The psalmist was fully alive to the splendor, the glory, and the value of this daily march over the heavens, and shows that while, as in the remainder of the psalm, he dwells on the law of the Lord as having another sphere, and in its place more fully illustrating the divine glory, he is not by any means insensible to the grandeur and beauty of the works of God as showing forth the divine perfections.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Psalms 19:6". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/psalms-19.html. 1870.

The Biblical Illustrator

Psalms 19:6

There is nothing hid from the heat thereof.

The moral uses of the weather

1. The contrasts and the changes of the season’s. What a picture of the vicissitudes of human life is in them! The experience of thousands has ranged from the extreme severity of winter’s poverty to the scorching blaze of midsummer prosperity. The man of wealth yesterday has become the beggar of today. Such contrasts and changes seem to have been far more numerous of late years than formerly.

2. Doubtless the extremes of heat and cold have their part to play in the beneficent economy of nature; yet no one doubts the physical evils that arise from them. To some, no doubt, the cold of winter seems invigorating and bracing, but to multitudes severity means death. So, too, there may be those to whom poverty and trial are stimulants to patient endurance, and develop some of the nobler qualities of the soul. We question, however, whether those are not the exceptions rather than the rule. Many of those around us are what they are largely because of their surroundings. When a man loses the stimulus of hope it is not very likely that his life will blossom into much moral beauty. We often hear it said, that prosperity is more dangerous to a man’s virtues than adversity; but we question whether there is not far more moral evil traceable to human poverty than many well-to-do philosophers are apt to imagine.

3. The poets have been influenced by something more than fancy when they have associated the ideas of cold and death, heat and life. Cold is only a relative term. Heat is essential to life.

4. The sun is the chief source whence heat is derived. The resistless energies of this omnipotent and all-pervading agent are in constant operation. There is not an instant or time that heat is not performing some important duty in fulfilment of the Divine purposes.

5. How dependent we are upon the weather for a bountiful harvest! Every summer brings us within a measurable distance of absolute want. The harvest, at best, does but provide for the wants of the year. It is seemly, then, that we should pray to the Lord of the harvest, that our “garners may be full.” Practical lessons--


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Bibliography
Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "Psalms 19:6". The Biblical Illustrator. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/psalms-19.html. 1905-1909. New York.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

His going forth is from the end of the heaven,.... From the east, where it rises:

and his circuit to the ends of it; to the west, where it sets; which is expressive of the large compass the Gospel administration took in the times of the apostles; whereby the grace of God appeared to all men, shone out in a very illustrious manner, and Christ became, what the sun is to the earth, the light of the world;

and there is nothing hid from the heat thereof; though things may be hid from the light of it, yet not from its heat, so forcible and penetrating it is Christ, in the administration of the Gospel to all to whom it comes with power, not only enlightens their minds, but quickens their souls, warms their hearts, causes them to burn within them, arises with healing in his wings upon them, and makes his Gospel the savour of life unto life unto them. The psalmist goes on to say more and excellent things of the Gospel, its nature and usefulness.


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Psalms 19:6". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/psalms-19.html. 1999.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

His going forth is from the end of the heaven, and his circuit unto the ends of it: and there is nothing hid from the heat thereof.

The ends — His course is constant from east to west, and thence to the east again. So that there is no part of the earth which doth not one time or other feel the benefit of his light and heat.


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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Psalms 19:6". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/psalms-19.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Psalms 19:6 His going forth [is] from the end of the heaven, and his circuit unto the ends of it: and there is nothing hid from the heat thereof.

Ver. 6. His going forth is from the end of the heaven] i.e, From the east unto the west, in which course, notwithstanding, while he compasseth the circle of heaven and earth, he visiteth the south and the north, and is unweariable.

And there is nothing hid from the heat thereof] i.e. From the beneft of the sun’s heat, who is ut cor incorpore, as the heart in the body, saith Aben Ezra; all things feel the quickening heat of the sun; not only the roots of trees, plants, &c., but metals and minerals, in the bowels of the earth.


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Psalms 19:6". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/psalms-19.html. 1865-1868.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

His course is constant from east to west, and thence to the east again. There is no part of the earth which doth not one time or other feel the comfort and benefit of its light and heat.


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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Psalms 19:6". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/psalms-19.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

6. From the end of the heaven… unto the ends of it—The description is in the language of common life. But as the natural sun appears to sweep the circuit of the heavens, flooding the celestial spaces with his light and heat, so spiritually does the “Sun of righteousness” (Malachi 4:2,) who also is the “Bridegroom.” John 3:29


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Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Psalms 19:6". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/psalms-19.html. 1874-1909.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

Psalms 19:6. His going forth is from the end of heaven — His course is constant from east to west, and thence to the east again. Or, “the light diffused on every side from its fountain, extendeth to the extremities of heaven, filling the whole circle of creation; penetrating even to the inmost substances of grosser bodies, and acting in and through all other matter as the general cause of life and motion.” — Horne. And there is nothing hid from the heat thereof — There is no part of the earth which doth not, at one time or other, feel the comfort and benefit of its light and heat; and there is no creature which does not, more or less, partake of its influence.


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Bibliography
Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on Psalms 19:6". Joseph Benson's Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/psalms-19.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Salvation. Jesus Christ, who gives us the victory over all our spiritual enemies, (Calmet) or in thy prosperity; (Worthington) which we shall attribute to God. The first words may also be addressed to Him. We shall rejoice if thou grant us the victory, and we will return thanks. Hebrew, "we shall praise, or be praised, for thy salvation; and in thy name we shall lift up the standard." (Calmet) --- But there is no proof that nodgol, (Haydock) which occurs no where else, has this signification. It is probable that the Septuagint read nogdol; and Houbigant adopts their version. St. Jerome has, "we shall dance." All the versions denote joy. (Berthier)


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Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Psalms 19:6". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/psalms-19.html. 1859.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

His going forth is from the end of the heaven, and his circuit unto the ends of it: and there is nothing hid from the heat thereof.

And there is nothing hid from the heat thereof. "Heat" here includes light, which is its accompaniment; because the word "hid" must primarily refer to light. There is nothing hid from its all-warming light, which is the handmaid to life (cf. John 1:4; John 1:8-9), as to the antitypical light.

The all-penetrating power of the sun (Psalms 19:6) forms the natural transition to the spiritual Sun. The section Psalms 19:7-10 sets forth the glories of the law, which emanates from the same God whose praises the heavens declare (Psalms 19:1-6). In the Psalms 19:7-9 twelve marks of praise are ascribed to the law, forming six pairs, in which the second mark of praise in each pair is related to the first as effect to cause; accordingly, no copula precedes the second, and the name of Yahweh occurs in the first member alone. Thus, in Psalms 19:7, "The law of the Lord is perfect, (and hence) it converts the soul: the testimony of the Lord is sure, (and hence) it makes wise the simple." In Psalms 19:7-8 the effects are those which the law produces on the soul and heart of man. In Psalms 19:10 the preciousness and sweetness of the words of God are indicated generally.


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Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Psalms 19:6". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/psalms-19.html. 1871-8.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

His going forth is from the end of the heaven, and his circuit unto the ends of it: and there is nothing hid from the heat thereof.
His going
139:9; Job 25:3; Ecclesiastes 1:5; Colossians 1:23
circuit
Job 22:14

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Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Psalms 19:6". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/psalms-19.html.

Ver. 6. He goes forth from the end of the heavens, and runs about even to their end, and nothing is concealed from his heat. On מוצא comp. Christol. P. III. p. 300. על is to be explained from the fact, that the going round at last touches, reaches the ends of the heavens. The אין נסתר prop. "not is concealed," "there is not anything which can be concealed." Heat is not to be considered as the opposite to light, as Venema and others think, according to whom what precedes refers only to the light; but as its inseparable accompaniment, equivalent to, "before its warming light." These last words also have respect to the mighty power of the sun, so that the Psalmist has this, through the whole representation, before his eyes.

There follows now, in Psalms 19:7-10, the praise of the law which has been given by this God, whose glory the heavens proclaim, and from whom, on this territory also, nothing but what is glorious and perfect can proceed. An artistic arrangement in this praise is not to be overlooked. In the three verses, Psalms 19:7-9, the law is praised in twelve sayings. These fall into six pairs, in which the second always stands to the first in the relation of effect to cause—a relation which is intimated through the regular want of the copula in the second, and the occurrence of Jehovah only in the first clause. So, for example, in Psalms 19:7, "The law of the Lord is perfect, (and hence) it quickens the soul; the testimony of the Lord is sure, (and hence) makes the simple wise." In Psalms 19:7 and Psalms 19:8, the result is uniformly some effect which the law produces in the mind of man, according to the quality indicated in the preceding clause. In the concluding verse, Psalms 19:10, the glory and preciousness of the law thus constituted, is celebrated as a whole. To the sixfold mention of the name Jehovah here, there is added a seventh at the close in Psalms 19:14.


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Bibliography
Hengstenberg, Ernst. "Commentary on Psalms 19:6". Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/heg/psalms-19.html.

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