corner graphic

Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Psalms 28:6

 

 

Blessed be the LORD, Because He has heard the voice of my supplication.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Blessed be the Lord, because he hath heard the voice of my supplications - This is one of those passages which frequently occur in the Psalms, when there has been an earnest and anxious prayer offered to God, and when the answer to the prayer seems to be immediate. The mind of the anxious and troubled pleader becomes calm; the promises of God are brought directly to the soul; the peace which was sought is obtained; and he who began the psalm with deep anxiety and trouble of mind, rejoices at the close of it in the evidences of the divine favor and love. What thus happened to the psalmist frequently occurs now. The answer to prayer, so far as giving calmness and assurance to the mind is concerned, is often immediate. The troubled spirit becomes calm; and whatever may be the result in other respects, the heart is made peaceful and confiding, and feels the assurance that all will be well. It is sufficient for us to feel that God hears us, for if this is so, we have the assurance that all is right. In this sense, certainly, it is right to look for an immediate answer to our prayers. See Isaiah 65:24, note; Daniel 9:21, note.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Psalms 28:6". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/psalms-28.html. 1870.

Coffman's Commentaries on the Bible

"Blessed is Jehovah,

Because he hath heard the voice of my supplications.

Jehovah is my strength and my shield;

My heart hath trusted in him, and I am helped;

Therefore my heart greatly rejoiceth;

And with my song will I praise him."

"He hath heard the voice of my supplications" (Psalms 28:6). This man, when he stood praying, believed that he had what he asked, and, so, believing, had it. There was no change in circumstances, but he was changed. Now there was no fear of going down into the pit, and the dread of the evil-doers disappeared.[20]

We may receive Maclaren's comment here as a valid deduction from what Jesus said, "And all things, whatsoever ye shall ask in prayer, believing, ye shall receive" (Matthew 21:22).

"I am helped ... will greatly rejoice .., and will praise him" (Psalms 28:7). The expression of such confidence begins with the statement that, "Jehovah is my strength," of which Adam Clarke declared the meaning to be, "I have the fullest persuasion that God hears, will answer, and will save me."[21]


Copyright Statement
James Burton Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.

Bibliography
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Psalms 28:6". "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/psalms-28.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Blessed be the Lord,.... Which must be understood, not as invoking nor as conferring a blessing on him, neither of which can be done by a creature; nor does he stand in need of any, he being Elshaddai, God all sufficient, God over all, blessed for ever; but as ascribing all blessedness to him, congratulating his greatness and happiness, and giving him praise and glory for mercies received; and particularly for the following:

because he hath heard the voice of my supplications; what he had prayed for, Psalm 28:2; an answer was quickly returned, even while he was speaking, Isaiah 65:24; though this may be an expression of faith, being fully persuaded and assured that he was heard, and would be answered, and may be said by a prophetic spirit; knowing that what he had humbly asked for would be granted; so Aben Ezra and Kimchi understand it in a way of prophecy.


Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Psalms 28:6". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/psalms-28.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

f Blessed [be] the LORD, because he hath heard the voice of my supplications.

(f) Because he felt the assurance of God's help in his heart, his mouth was opened to sing his praises.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Psalms 28:6". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/psalms-28.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

supplications — or, “cries for mercy.”


Copyright Statement
These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Psalms 28:6". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/psalms-28.html. 1871-8.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

6.Blessed be Jehovah, who hath heard. This is the second part of the psalm in which the prophet begins to give thanks to God. We have already seen how he employed himself in prayer in the midst of his dangers; and now by this thanksgiving he teaches us that his prayers were not in vain. Thus he confirms by his own example, that God is ready to bring help to his people whenever they seek him in truth and sincerity. He declares the same truth more fully in the next verse, calling God his strength and his shield; for he was persuaded that God had heard him from this, that he had been wonderfully preserved. He adds, that he had been helped in respect of his confidence and hope; for it often comes to pass, that those who call upon God, notwithstanding come short of his grace through their own unbelief. Thirdly, he says that he will add to his joy a testimony of his gratitude. Wicked men and hypocrites flee to God when they are overwhelmed with difficulties, but as soon as they escape from them, forgetting their deliverer, they rejoice with frantic mirth. In short, David trusted not in vain, since he truly found by experience that God possesses ever present power to preserve his servants; and that this was matter of true and solid joy to him, that he found God ever favorable to him. On this account, likewise, he promises that he would be mindful of God, and grateful to him. And undoubtedly, when God spreads cheerfulness through our hearts, it is to open our mouths to sing his praises.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Psalms 28:6". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/psalms-28.html. 1840-57.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Psalms 28:6 Blessed [be] the LORD, because he hath heard the voice of my supplications.

Ver. 6. Blessed be the Lord, because he hath heard, &c.] God will one day turn the prayers of his people into praises. David, Psalms 28:1, had said, Be not silent to me; here, Blessed be God, for he hath answered me. So Jehoshaphat had his Baca soon turned into Berachah, 2 Chronicles 20:18-19. See David’s syllogism; and mark his conclusion, Psalms 66:18-20, not according to the rules of logic, but better.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Psalms 28:6". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/psalms-28.html. 1865-1868.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

He speaks of it as past, either because God had in part heard and answered him already, or because God assured him by his Spirit that he had heard and accepted his prayers, and would assuredly answer him in due time.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Psalms 28:6". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/psalms-28.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

6. Blessed be the Lord—The psalm suddenly turns from prayer to praise.

Because he hath heard—The answer of prayer is the ground of David’s rejoicing. Some sudden turn of affairs, or the uprising of a new power of faith, gives assurance of his restoration to his throne and the sanctuary. Probably he wrote the former part of the psalm before, and the latter after, the battle and victory. 2 Samuel 18. This agrees with the preterites of Psalms 28:7 : “My heart trusted, and I have been helped,” etc.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Psalms 28:6". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/psalms-28.html. 1874-1909.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Shall reduce them to pieces, &c. In Hebrew, shall make them to skip like a calf. The psalmist here describes the effects of thunder, (which he calls the voice of the Lord) which sometimes breaks down the tallest and strongest trees; and makes their broken branches skip, &c. All this is to be understood mystically, of the powerful voice of God's word in his Church; which has broke the pride of the great ones of this world, and brought many of them meekly and joyfully to submit their necks to the sweet yoke of Christ. (Challoner) --- Calf, or "branch," as the Greek word also implies. But Hebrew seems more naturally to signify "a calf; Libanus and Sirion, (or Sarion.; Deuteronomy iii. 9.) as the son of the unicorn." These two mountains are represented jolting together. (Calmet) --- The violence of an earthquake has sometimes produced such effects. (Pliny, [Natural History?] ii. 83.) See Psalm cxiii. 4., Judges v. 5., and Habacuc iii. 10. (Calmet) --- And as. The construction & dilectus, seems rather to make this only nominative, "the Lord shall, &c., and the beloved, (Haydock) the Messias, like the son of the unicorn," shall perform the like wonders. It seems probable that the Septuagint have read Jeshurun for Shirion, (Berthier) or vissron, instead of ussriun; as i would onlybe a little transposed. (Haydock) --- Jeshurun is a title of Israel, (Deuteronomy xxxii. 15., and xxxiii. 5, 26.) who was a figure of the Messias, the beloved of God. (Berthier) --- "And he will scatter them as a calf would do; Libanus and Sarion, are in motion, like the son of the rhinoceros." (St. Jerome) (Haydock) The most powerful submit to Christ, who works these wonders. (Worthington)


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Psalms 28:6". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/psalms-28.html. 1859.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Blessed be the LORD, because he hath heard the voice of my supplications.

Assurance follows prayer in God's appointed order.

Blessed be the Lord, because he hath heard. The thanksgiving is in the very words of his prayer (Psalms 28:2), marking the inseparable connection of prayer and its answer.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Psalms 28:6". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/psalms-28.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(6) This burst of thanksgiving, breaking in on the poet’s prayer, has led to the supposition that an interval elapsed between the composition of the former part of the psalm and this verse, and that the writer takes up his pen to record the answer his supplications have received. Others regard the psalm as composed by the union of two distinct pieces. Others again treat Psalms 28:6 as an interpolation. It certainly seems discordant with the rhythm as well as with the sense of the rest.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Psalms 28:6". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/psalms-28.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Blessed be the LORD, because he hath heard the voice of my supplications.
31:21,22; 66:19,20; 69:33,34; 107:19-22; 116:1,2; 118:5

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Psalms 28:6". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/psalms-28.html.

Ver. 6. Blessed be the Lord, because He hath, heard the voice of my supplications. The words of the second verse are here designedly repeated, only the imperative is changed into the Preterite. The Lord be thanked, exclaims the Psalmist joyfully, I now possess what I have prayed for.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Hengstenberg, Ernst. "Commentary on Psalms 28:6". Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/heg/psalms-28.html.

To report dead links, typos, or html errors or suggestions about making these resources more useful use our convenient contact form
Powered by Lightspeed Technology