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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Psalms 28:8

 

 

The LORD is their strength, And He is a saving defense to His anointed.

Adam Clarke Commentary

The Lord is their strength - Instead of למו lamo, to them, eight MSS. of Kennicott and De Rossi have לעמו leammo to his people; and this reading is confirmed by the Septuagint, Syriac, Vulgate, Ethiopic, Arabic, and Anglo-Saxon. This makes the passage more precise and intelligible; and of the truth of the reading there can be no reasonable doubt. "The Lord is the strength of his People, and the saving strength of his anointed." Both king and people are protected, upheld, and saved by him.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Psalms 28:8". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/psalms-28.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

The Lord is their strength - Margin, “his strength.” The Hebrew is, “their strength,” or “strength to them.” The allusion is to the people of God. The course of thought seems to be, that the psalmist, having derived in his own case assistance from God, or having found God a strength to him, his mind turns from this fact to the general idea that God was the strength of “all” who were in similar circumstancaes; or that all His people might confide in Him as he had done.

And he is the saving strength - Margin, as in Hebrew, “strength of salvations.” That is, In Him is found the strength which produces salvation. See the notes at Psalm 27:1.

Of his anointed - See Psalm 2:2, note; Psalm 20:6, note. The primary reference here is doubtless to the psalmist himself, as one who had been annointed or set apaart to the kingly office; but the connection shows that he intended to include all the people of God, as those whom He had consecrated or set apart to His service. See 1 Peter 2:5, 1 Peter 2:9.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Psalms 28:8". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/psalms-28.html. 1870.

The Biblical Illustrator

Psalms 28:8

My heart trusted in Him; and I am helped.

The earlier and the later song

There are two actions of the heart--prophecy and memory. In the morning of life I look forward, “my heart trusted”; in the afternoon I look back, “my heart rejoiceth.” The morning trust comes before help; it is the prospect of the West seen from the crimson dawn. The afternoon joy follows help: it is the memory of the East seen from the setting sun. My heart is like the migration of the swallows. Every swallow makes its first migration in faith; but at the second its prophecy is turned into a memory. It is no more the heart trusting, but the heart rejoicing. My soul, which of thy migrations is the nobler? Is it the trusting or the rejoicing, the prophecy or the memory, thy journey from East to West, or thy travelling from West to East? The psalmist prefers Shy evening song--the song of memory. It is the swallow after migration. It is a song in spite of storm. It is a praise of life as it is. Faith may sing of the rose behind the thorn; but love sits upon the rose bush and smiles back upon the thorn. Faith journeys from Egypt to seek the promised land; love rests in the promised land, and blesses the journey from Egypt. Faith vows all worship if it shall come without pain to the Father’s house; love reposes in the Father’s house and says: “It was good for me to have been afflicted.” The song of memory is a song of praise. (G. Matheson, D. D.)


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Bibliography
Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "Psalms 28:8". The Biblical Illustrator. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/psalms-28.html. 1905-1909. New York.

Coffman's Commentaries on the Bible

"Jehovah is their strength, and he is a stronghold of salvation to his anointed.

Save thy people, and bless thine inheritance:

Be their shepherd also, and bear them up forever"

"Stronghold ... to his anointed" (Psalms 28:8). Addis stated that "anointed" in this passage may refer, "Either to the king or to the high priests."[22] This is true enough, of course; but as Dahood noted, in this passage, "The reference is to the King."[23]

"Here David builds upon the fact that he is God's anointed, that he is more than a private citizen. As the Lord's anointed (a term that grew into the Messiah), he stood for his people, and God's grace must be meant for them as well as for himself."[24]

Being assured that God has indeed answered his prayer, David here takes courage and asks for the deliverance of all Israel.

"As God's anointed here, David realizes that the fortunes of the people rise and fall with him."[25] From this, there springs at once this fervent prayer for the welfare of all of God's people, even the nation of Israel. The sudden outcropping of the Shepherd metaphor in the last line is another mark of the Davidic authorship.


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James Burton Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.

Bibliography
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Psalms 28:8". "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/psalms-28.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

The Lord is their strength,.... The strength of his people, mentioned in Psalm 28:9; not only the strength of David in particular, but of all his people in general; see Psalm 37:39;

and he is the saving strength of his anointed; meaning either himself, as before, who was anointed by Samuel king of Israel, and therefore had not invaded and thrust himself into an office he had no call and right unto; or the Messiah, the Lord's Anointed, whom he heard, helped, and strengthened in the day of salvation, and delivered him from the power of death and the grave, and raised him from thence, and gave him glory; see Psalm 20:6.


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Psalms 28:8". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/psalms-28.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

The LORD [is] g their strength, and he [is] the saving strength of his anointed.

(g) Meaning his soldiers who were means by which God declared his power.

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Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Psalms 28:8". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/psalms-28.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

The distinction made between the people.

their strength — and the anointed — may indicate Absalom‘s rebellion as the occasion.


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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Psalms 28:8". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/psalms-28.html. 1871-8.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

8.Jehovah is their strength. By way of explanation, he repeats what he had said before, that God had been his strength; namely, because he had blessed his armies. David had indeed employed the hand and labor of men, but to God alone he ascribes the victory. As he knew that whatever help he had obtained from men proceeded from God, and that his prosperous success flowed likewise from his gratuitous favor, he discerned his hand in these means, as palpably as if it had been stretched forth from heaven. And surely it is passing shameful, that human means, which are only the instruments of God’s power, should obscure his glory; although there is no sin more common. It is a manner of speaking which has great weight, when, speaking of his soldiers, he uses only the pronoun their, as if he pointed to them with the finger. The second clause assigns the reason of the other. He declares that himself and his whole army were endued with victorious valor from heaven, because he fought under the standard of God. This is the meaning of the word anointed; for, had not God appointed him king, and freely adopted him, he would not have favored him any more than he did Saul. By this means, in extolling solely the power of God which advanced him to the kingdom, he attributes nothing to his own policy or power. In the meantime, we may learn, that when one is satisfied of the lawfulness of his calling, this doctrine encourages him to entertain good hope with respect to the prosperous issue of his affairs. In particular, it is to be observed, as we have briefly noticed in another place, that the fountain whence all the blessings God bestows upon us flows is, that he hath chosen us in Christ. David employs salvations or deliverances in the plural number, because he had been often and in various ways preserved. The meaning, therefore, is, that from the time when God had anointed him by the hand of Samuel, he never ceased to help him, but delivered him in innumerable ways, until he had accomplished the work of his grace in him.


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Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Psalms 28:8". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/psalms-28.html. 1840-57.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Psalms 28:8 The LORD [is] their strength, and he [is] the saving strength of his anointed.

Ver. 8. The Lord is their strength] Not mine only, as Psalms 28:7, but the strength of all and every one of the holy community, of true Christians, partakers of Christ’s unction, of his Spirit.


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Psalms 28:8". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/psalms-28.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Psalms 28:8. The Lord is their strength The Lord is his guard; even he himself is the triumphant guard of his anointed. So Mudge; who observes, that the words are evidently spoken by the people, or priests, returning the words which the king had just before used. Houbigant renders it, The Lord is the strength of his people; and indeed our translation, as it now stands, plainly refers to the people in the next verse.


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Bibliography
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Psalms 28:8". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/psalms-28.html. 1801-1803.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Their strength, i.e. the strength of his people, mentioned in the next verse; the relative being put before the antecedent, which is left to be gathered out of the following matter, as it is Numbers 24:17 Psalms 87:1. Or, his strength; for the Hebrew affix mo, which commonly is plural, is sometimes taken singularly; of which see my Latin Synopsis here, and on Isaiah 53:8. And his, i.e. of his anointed, as the next clause explains it. Or the words may be thus rendered, Strength is or belongs to thee Lord. Heb. The Lord, strength is his, or to him. It is a Hebrew pleonasm.

The saving strength, Heb. the strength of the preservations, or deliverances, or victories, or salvations, i.e. he by whose strength alone he hath got these victories, &c.

Of his anointed, i.e. of me, whom he hath anointed to be king, whom therefore he will defend; he speaks of himself in the third person, which is usual in the Hebrew tongue.


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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Psalms 28:8". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/psalms-28.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

8. Their strength—The pronoun, which may be either singular or plural, should be here rendered singular, as it corresponds with anointed (that is, the king) in the parallel line, which should read:

“Jehovah is his strength,

Even the strength of the salvations of his Anointed is he.”


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Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Psalms 28:8". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/psalms-28.html. 1874-1909.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

Psalms 28:8. The Lord is their strength — That is, the strength of his people, mentioned in the next verse. He is the saving strength — Hebrews ישׁועות מעון, the strength of the preservations, deliverances, or salvations; of his anointed — Of me, whom he hath anointed to be king, and whom therefore he will defend. He signifies that it was by God’s strength alone that his victories, deliverances, and preservations were wrought.


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Bibliography
Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on Psalms 28:8". Joseph Benson's Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/psalms-28.html. 1857.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

their = [strength] to His People. The letter Aleph being interchangeable with Ayin. This orthography is attested by some codices, and by Septuagint and Syriac. Thus agreeing with Psalms 29:11.

saving strength = great saving strength. Hebrew "strength of salvations". Plural of majesty.

of = to.

His anointed = His Messiah, as in Psalms 2:2.


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Psalms 28:8". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/psalms-28.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

The LORD is their strength, and he is the saving strength of his anointed.

Their strength. "The Lord," whom he had called "my strength" (Psalms 28:7), he now calls "their strength;" so wholly identified is his cause with that of his people.

He is the saving strength - literally, the strength of saving deliverances. In saving his anointed king, God saves the people over whom He has anointed him (Psalms 18:50; cf. Psalms 28:9).


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Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Psalms 28:8". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/psalms-28.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(8) Their strength—i.e., the strength of His people, who are throughout in the poet’s thought, even if it is the individual and not the community that speaks. The LXX. and Vulg. read (comp. Psalms 29:11) “to his people.”

Saving strength.—Better, stronghold of salvation. (See margin.)


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Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Psalms 28:8". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/psalms-28.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

The LORD is their strength, and he is the saving strength of his anointed.
their
or, his. saving strength. Heb. strength of salvations. his.
2:2; 20:6; 1 Samuel 16:13; Isaiah 61:1

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Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Psalms 28:8". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/psalms-28.html.

Ver. 8. The Lord is their strength, and He is the saving stronghold of His anointed one. There follows here the song spoken of in the preceding verse, so that we are to read this verse as if with marks of quotation. The reason why we have "their," without any noun going before to which it might refer, obviously is, that the king in the preceding verses had prayed for himself, not so much as an individual, but as a king, and as thus one with his people. Compare Psalms 28:9. The Psalmist so sunk his personality in his official position, and so identified himself with his people, that he wrote simpliciter למו instead of לי. When the Psalmist, in the second clause, applies to himself the title of "the anointed of the Lord" (compare Psalms 50), he must thereby be understood as expressly asserting, that the help which had been vouchsafed to him as king was therefore imparted in him to the people of God. On the plu. ישועות, compare at Psalms 18:50.

In the conclusion, the Psalmist prays that the Lord would do eternally that which He had now done.


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Bibliography
Hengstenberg, Ernst. "Commentary on Psalms 28:8". Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/heg/psalms-28.html.

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