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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Psalms 30:1

 

 

I will extol You, O LORD, for You have lifted me up, And have not let my enemies rejoice over me.

Adam Clarke Commentary

I will extol thee - for thou hast lifted me up - I will lift thee up, for thou hast lifted me up. Thou hast made me blessed, and I will make thee glorious. Thou hast magnified me in thy mercy; and I will show forth thy praise, and speak good of thy name.

I have made some remarks on this Psalm in the Introduction.

In this Psalm we find seven different states of mind distinctly marked: -

  1. It is implied, in the first verse, that David had been in great distress, and nearly overwhelmed by his enemies.
  • He extols God for having lifted him up, and having preserved him from the cruelty of his adversaries, Psalm 30:1-3.
  • He is brought into great prosperity, trusts in what he had received, and forgets to depend wholly on the Lord, Psalm 30:4-6.
  • The Lord hides his face from him, and he is brought into great distress, Psalm 30:7.
  • He feels his loss, and makes earnest prayer and supplication, Psalm 30:8-10.
  • He is restored to the Divine favor, and filled with joy, Psalm 30:11.
  • He purposes to glory in God alone, and to trust in him for ever, Psalm 30:12.
  • As it is impossible for any man to have passed through all these states at the same time; it is supposed that the Psalm, like many others of the same complexion, has been formed out of the memoranda of a diary. See this point illustrated in the Introduction.

    Thou hast lifted me up - Out of the pit into which I had fallen: the vain curiosity, and want of trust in God, that induced me to number the people. Bishop Horsley translates, Because thou hast depressed me. I thank God for my humiliation and afflictions, because they have been the means of teaching me lessons of great profit and importance.


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    Bibliography
    Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Psalms 30:1". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/psalms-30.html. 1832.

    Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

    I will extol thee - literally, “I will exalt thee;” that is, he would make God first and supreme in his thoughts and affections; he would do what he could to make Him known; he would elevate Him high in his praises.

    For thou hast lifted me up - To wit, from the state of danger in which I was Psalm 30:2-3. The Hebrew word used here means properly to draw out, as from a well; and then, to deliver, to set free. As God had thus lifted him up, it was proper that he should show his gratitude by “lifting up” or extolling the name of God.

    And hast not made my foes to rejoice over me - Hast not suffered them to triumph over me; that is, thou hast delivered me from them. He refers to the fact that he had been saved from a dangerous illness, and that his enemies had not been allowed to exult over his death. Compare the notes at Psalm 41:5.


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    Bibliography
    Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Psalms 30:1". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/psalms-30.html. 1870.

    Coffman's Commentaries on the Bible

    PSALM 30

    THANKSGIVING FOR DELIVERANCE FROM DEATH

    There are no satisfactory reasons for rejecting the ancient inscription which identifies this psalm as "A Psalm of David." The further note in some versions that it is, "A Song at the Dedication of the House," also generally received as accurate, is the basis of several opinions regarding its meaning.

    A summary of various views as to what is meant by the "Dedication of the House" is as follows:

    It refers to the Temple of Zerubbabel in 165 B.C.[1] Some say it refers to the Temple of Solomon. Some think it means the house of David's palace, Others assign it to the purgation and re-dedication of David's house (palace) after Absalom left.

    Calmet believed the psalm was written by David on the occasion of the dedication of the Threshing Floor of Araunah, after the awful plague that followed David's numbering of the people (2 Samuel 24:25; 1 Chronicles 21:26).

    Adam Clarke discussed all of these opinions and then wrote, "All parts of this Psalm agree to Calmet's opinion so well, and to no other hypothesis, that I feel justified in basing my comment upon this understanding alone."[2]

    Leupold also accepted the same understanding of the occasion for this psalm, pointing out that, "1 Chronicles 22:1 uses the identical words that appear in the heading of this Psalm, namely, `Here shall be the House.' We feel that this Psalm fits this historical situation as a glove fits the hand."[3]

    There are a number of places in the psalm itself which correspond closely with the historical occasion; and we shall notice some of these in the comments below. The following paragraphs appear in the psalm.

    (Psalms 30:1-3) Thanksgiving is offered for a great deliverance. (Psalms 30:4,5) The people are invited to join in the thanksgiving. (Psalms 30:6-7) David confesses his sin which was to blame for the catastrophe. (V:8-10) David's appeal to God and his earnest supplications. (Psalms 30:11-12) The sudden and complete relief, the burst of joy, and the pledge to praise God forever.

    THANKSGIVING FOR A GREAT DELIVERANCE

    Some think of a terrible illness into which David fell, but the more likely explanation is that David, feeling his own blame and guilt connected with the awful plague that destroyed 70,000 people in a single day, knowing that he certainly deserved to die and probably expecting his death momentarily, thanks the Lord, not for a delivery from illness, but for a deliverance "from death" as the heading states. (2 Samuel 24:15f).

    Psalms 30:1-3

    "I will extol thee, O Jehovah, for thou hast raised me up,

    And hast not made my foes to rejoice over me.

    O Jehovah my God,

    I cried unto thee, and thou hast healed me.

    O Jehovah, thou hast brought up my soul from Sheol;

    Thou hast kept me alive, that I should not go down to the pit."

    There are five things for which David here thanks God: (1) God has raised him up, (2) has not allowed his foes to rejoice over him, (3) healed him, (4) brought up his soul from Sheol, (5) and kept him alive.

    "Thou hast raised me up" (Psalms 30:1). The marginal reading here is "drawn me up"; and, "This is the word for pulling up a bucket from a well."[4] This appears to us as an expression more appropriate for an acute state of depression and fear than it would be for some kind of an illness.

    "Thou hast healed me" (Psalms 30:2). "The word `healed' here is perhaps used metaphorically for the removal of mental sufferings. David's grief when he saw the suffering and death of so many of his people from the plague (for which he was to blame) seems to have prostrated him both in mind and in body."[5] "David was keenly aware of the danger that threatened him. Many were dying in Israel, and he knew himself to be the chief sinner that brought it about, thus feeling that his doom was as good as sealed."[6] It was David's sin of numbering the people that caused the plague.


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    James Burton Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.

    Bibliography
    Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Psalms 30:1". "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/psalms-30.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

    John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

    I will extol thee, O Lord,.... Or "lift thee up on high"F11אדוממך "superexaltabo te", Cocceius; "elevabo te", Michaelis. . The Lord is high in his name, he is the most High; and in his nature, there is none besides him, nor like unto him; and in place, he dwells in the high and holy place; he is above all, angels and men; he is above all gods; he is the King of kings, and Lord of lords; he cannot be higher than he is: to extol him, therefore, is to declare him to be what he is; to exalt him in high praises of him, which the psalmist determined to do, for the following reasons;

    for thou hast lifted me up; or "drawn me up", or "out"F12רליגי "me sursum extraxisti", Cocceius; so Michaelis; "thou hast drawn me up", Ainsworth. ; from the pit of nature; the low estate of unregeneracy; the pit wherein is no water: the horrible pit, the mire and clay of sin and misery, in which all men, while unconverted, are; and out of which they cannot lift themselves, being without strength, yea, dead in sin: this is God's work; he takes out of this pit, he draws out of it by his efficacious grace; he raises up the poor out of the dust, and lifts up the beggar from the dunghill; and this is an instance of his grace and mercy, and requires a new song of praise: or this may regard some great fall by sin, from which he was restored, through the grace and power of God; or deliverance from great troubles, compared to waters, out of which he was drawn, Psalm 18:16; and was lifted up above his enemies; and agrees very well with his being brought to his palace and throne again, upon the defeat of Absalom;

    and hast not made my foes to rejoice over me; as Satan does over unregenerate sinners, when he possesses their hearts, and keeps the house and goods in peace; and as the men of the world do over fallen saints, when forsaken by the Lord, and afflicted by him, and are under the frowns of his providence; but the conspirators against David were not suffered to succeed and rejoice over him, which they otherwise would have done; and for this he praises the Lord.


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    Bibliography
    Gill, John. "Commentary on Psalms 30:1". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/psalms-30.html. 1999.

    Geneva Study Bible

    "A Psalm [and] Song [at] the dedication of the a house of David." I will extol thee, O LORD; b for thou hast lifted me up, and hast not made my foes to rejoice over me.

    (a) After Absalom had polluted it with most filthy fornication.

    (b) He condemns them for great ingratitude who do not praise God for his benefits.


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    Bibliography
    Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Psalms 30:1". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/psalms-30.html. 1599-1645.

    Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

    Psalm 30:1-12. Literally, “A Psalm-Song” - a composition to be sung with musical instruments, or without them - or, “Song of the dedication,” etc. specifying the particular character of the Psalm. Some suppose that of David should be connected with the name of the composition, and not with “house”; and refer for the occasion to the selection of a site for the temple (1 Chronicles 21:26-30; 1 Chronicles 22:1). But “house” is never used absolutely for the temple, and “dedication” does not well apply to such an occasion. Though the phrase in the Hebrew, “dedication of the house of David,” is an unusual form, yet it is equally unusual to disconnect the name of the author and the composition. As a “dedication of David‘s house” (as provided, Deuteronomy 20:5), the scope of the Psalm well corresponds with the state of repose and meditation on his past trials suited to such an occasion (2 Samuel 5:11; 2 Samuel 7:2). For beginning with a celebration of God‘s delivering favor, in which he invites others to join, he relates his prayer in distress, and God‘s gracious and prompt answer.

    lifted me up — as one is drawn from a well (Psalm 40:2).


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    Bibliography
    Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Psalms 30:1". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/psalms-30.html. 1871-8.

    Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

    1.I will extol thee, O Jehovah! As David had been brought, as it were, from the grave to the life-giving air, he promises to extol the name of God. It is God who lifts us up with his own hand when we have been plunged into a profound gulf; and therefore it is our duty, on our part, to sing his praises with our tongues. By the foes who, he says, obtained no matter of rejoicing over him, we may understand both domestic and foreign enemies. Although wicked and evil disposed persons flattered him with servile adulation, they at the same time cherished secret hatred against him, and were ready to insult him as soon as an opportunity should occur. In the second verse, he concludes that he was preserved by the favor of God, alleging in proof of this, that when he was at the very point of death he directed his supplications to God alone, and that he immediately felt that he had not done so in vain. When God hears our prayers, it is a proof which enables us to conclude with certainty that he is the author of our salvation, and of the deliverance which we obtain. As the Hebrew word רפא, rapha, signifies to heal, interpreters have been led, from this consideration, to restrict it to sickness. But as it is certain, that it sometimes signifies to restore, orto set up again, and is moreover applied to an altar or a house when they are said to be repaired or rebuilt, it may properly enough mean here any deliverance. The life of man is in danger in many other ways than merely from disease; and we know that it is a form of speech which occurs every where in the Psalms, to say that David was restored to life whenever the Lord delivered him from any grievous and extreme danger. For the sake of amplification, accordingly, he immediately adds, Thou hast brought up my soul from the grave He reckoned that he could not sufficiently express in words the magnitude of the favor which God had conferred upon him, unless he compared the darkness of that period to a grave and pit, into which he had been forced to throw himself hastily, to protect his life by hiding, until the flame of insurrection was quenched. As one restored to life, therefore, he proclaims that he had been marvellously delivered from present death, as if he had been restored to life after he had been dead. And assuredly, it appears from sacred history, how completely he was overwhelmed with despair on every side.


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    Calvin, John. "Commentary on Psalms 30:1". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/psalms-30.html. 1840-57.

    John Trapp Complete Commentary

    Psalms 30:1 « A Psalm [and] Song [at] the dedication of the house of David. » I will extol thee, O LORD for thou hast lifted me up, and hast not made my foes to rejoice over me.

    A Psalm and Song] i.e. A holy hymn, first framed in metre, then sung with men’s voices.

    At the dedication of the house of David] Either when it was newly built, 2 Samuel 5:11, confer Deuteronomy 20:5, Nehemiah 12:27, saying, as he once,

    Iamque, meos dedo tibi, Princeps, iure Penates,

    Tu mihi ius dederas, posse vocare meos.

    God so loveth his people that their walls are ever in his sight, Isaiah 49:16; they should therefore have holiness to the Lord written upon them, Zechariah 14:20, sanctified they should be by the word and prayer, 1 Timothy 4:5. Or else, after he had defiled it by his adultery with Bathsheba, and Absalom had much more defiled it by his abominable incest and other villanies, See 2 Samuel 20:3.

    Ver. 1. I will extol thee, O Lord; for thou hast lifted me up] De puteo peccati caenoso, saith Kimchi, out of the miry pit of sin; or out of the ditch of deadly danger, say others. Therefore I will extol thee, that is, I will have high and honourable conceptions of thee. I will also do mine utmost, both by words and deeds, that thou mayest be acknowledged by others to be as thou art, the great and mighty monarch of the whole world.

    And hast not made my foes to rejoice over me] Beside all former victories, Absalom and Sheba were lately slain.


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    Bibliography
    Trapp, John. "Commentary on Psalms 30:1". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/psalms-30.html. 1865-1868.

    Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

    Psalms 30.

    David praiseth God for his deliverances: he exhorteth others to praise him by the example of God's dealing with him.

    A Psalm and Song, at the dedication of the house of David.

    Title. שׁיר מזמור mizmor shiir. A psalm and song, &c.— This excellent composition is well suited to the occasion on which it was penned: for nothing could be more proper than the recollection of the past conduct of Providence, amid the various changes of condition which had attended David, the numerous and dangerous distresses that had befallen him, and the deliverances which God had seasonably wrought out for him; till, at length, he was brought to the height of prosperity, when he saw Jerusalem well fortified, and her numerous buildings rising up under his hand, and his own palace magnificently finished for the residence of himself and family. This psalm is penned with great strength and elegance of diction, and the sentiments of piety in it are truly noble and instructive. The manner in which he describes the interpositions of God's favour, and the gratitude of his own heart, is warm, sententious, and affecting; the periods being short, generally without the connective particles, and answering to the events which crowded fair one after another, and the various affections which inspired him. Nor should the excellent design of it be forgotten; which is to put men in mind of the folly and vanity of that presumption which causes them to forget themselves, and fondly depend on the continuance of their external prosperity; and to shew them, that when their expectations of this kind are highest, they may then be nearest to a severe disappointment by a sudden reverse of their circumstances, in order more effectually to convince them, that, as all their prosperity is originally from God, the continuance of it depends solely on his favour. And, on the other hand, we are instructed, that all the afflictions of life are under a divine direction; that we should never despair, but should apply ourselves to God, when exercised with them, by frequent supplication, and hope in his mercy, who can and will deliver us out of them, if, upon the whole, it be necessary to promote our best and highest happiness. Dr. Chandler.

    At the dedication of the house of David The original word חנכה chanukkah signifies to initiate, or the first use which is made of any thing. It was common, when any person had finished a house and entered into it, to celebrate it with great rejoicings, and keep a festival, to which his friends were invited, and to perform some religious ceremonies to procure the protection of heaven. See Deuteronomy 20:5.

    Psalms 30:1. Thou hast lifted me up Or, Thou hast drawn me up. The verb דלה dalah is used in its original meaning, to denote the reciprocating motion of the buckets of a well; one descending as the other rises, and vice versa; and it is here applied, with admirable propriety, to point out the various reciprocations and changes of David's fortunes, as described in this psalm, as to prosperity and adversity; and particularly that gracious reverse of his afflicted condition which he now celebrates, God having raised him up to great honour and prosperity; for, having built his palace, he perceived that the Lord had established him king over Israel, and that he had exalted his kingdom, for his people Israel's sake. 2 Samuel 5:12 and see Schultens on Proverbs 20:5 and Chandler.


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    Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Psalms 30:1". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/psalms-30.html. 1801-1803.

    Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary

    CONTENTS

    The title of this Psalm tells what it is. The Psalmist praiseth God for his goodness, and he calleth upon others to do the same from the same cause.

    A Psalm and Song at the dedication of the house of David.

    Psalms 30:1

    The dedication of David's house leads to the spiritual sense of this blessed scripture. The temple, or house, is a type of the body of Jesus. Our authority for this interpretation we find in the Apostle James (Acts 15:16), who expressly, in so many words, determines the repair of David's tabernacle to be altogether a type of the ever blessed Jesus at his resurrection. So that here we are at no loss to discover Jesus thus extol ling God the Father for that illustrious event. And with this clue, we shall find sweet discoveries of Jesus praising and blessing God for his own victory over all the foes of his salvation, and his people's victory in him. Reader, pray for grace to keep this in remembrance, while perusing this Psalm; and then if through faith we are raised from the death of sin, through him, we shall feel our own personal interest in all that is here said concerning him, in whom we triumph.


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    Hawker, Robert, D.D. "Commentary on Psalms 30:1". "Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/pmc/psalms-30.html. 1828.

    Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

    PSALM 30

    A Psalm and Song; or, A Psalm of Song; i.e. either,

    1. A Psalm to be sung with the voice to an instrument. Or,

    2. A Psalm of joy and praise; for so this is. And this Hebrew word schir may be here taken not simply for a song, but for a joyful song, as it is Genesis 31:27 Exodus 15:1 Psalms 33:3 42:8 Proverbs 25:20 Isaiah 30:29 Amos 8:3,10. At the dedication of the house of David; either,

    1. At the dedication of the temple, called the house, or that house, eminently and emphatically. So the Chaldee paraphrast and the Hebrew doctors understand it. And then the last words, of David, are to be joined with the first, a Psalm and Song. But this seems not probable, because the temple was not built by David, nor in his days, although he might prescribe a Psalm to be used afterwards upon that occasion. Or,

    2. At the dedication of David’s house, which was built, 2 Samuel 5:11, and doubtless was dedicated, as God had commanded. See Deuteronomy 20:5 Nehemiah 12:27. Or,

    3. At the second dedication of David’s house, after it had been polluted by Absalom and his concubines. But there is no law of God for any re-dedication of houses in such cases, nor any evidence that David did so. And indeed it seems strange, if this Psalm was made upon this occasion, or upon any of these dedications here mentioned, that there should not be one line in it suitable to that occasion. Others therefore make these words,

    the dedication of the house, not to note the matter of this Psalm or Song; but either,

    1. The name of the tune to which this song was sung, which was the same that David used at the dedication of his house; and so this gives us a reason why the word Song is added to that of Psalm, and why this Psalm was called the Song of the dedication. Or,

    2. The time when it was sung; which was at the dedication of David’s house. For such dedications were performed in a very solemn manner, with divers rites and prayers, and praises to God, as the nature of that business required. And it seems probable from the matter of this Psalm, compared with the title, that David had about this time been delivered from some eminent distresses, and particularly from some dangerous sickness; for which he here gives thanks to God, taking advantage of this public and solemn occasion.

    The psalmist praiseth God for deliverance out of great danger, Psalms 30:1-3; and exhorteth others to do the same, Psalms 30:4,5. He acknowledgeth to God that his prayer was heard, and him-self girded with gladness, Psalms 30:6-11. He will give thanks to God for ever, Psalms 30:12.

    Lifted me up; or, drawn up, to wit, out of the deep pit, or waters; to which great dangers and afflictions are frequently compared.

    To rejoice over me; which they both desired and confidently expected an occasion to do.


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    Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Psalms 30:1". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/psalms-30.html. 1685.

    Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

    1. Lifted me up—The word signifies to draw up, as water from a well, or a man out of a deep pit, and is used to denote any extrication from perilous conditions. See Psalms 30:3.

    My foes to rejoice over me—Great as David had become in war and in peace, he was never without deadly enemies who would have rejoiced at his downfall, and only waited opportunity to accomplish it. No innocence or prudence can protect a man in power and influence from envy, rivalry, and hatred, nor a godly man from persecution.


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    Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Psalms 30:1". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/psalms-30.html. 1874-1909.

    Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

    The reason David wanted to praise God was that the Lord had restored him (cf. Isaiah 38:10-20). Had God not done this, the psalmist believed his enemies would have been able to rejoice over his death.


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    Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on Psalms 30:1". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/psalms-30.html. 2012.

    Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

    Psalms 30:1. Thou hast lifted me up — Hebrew, דליתני, dillitani, evexisti me, Buxtorff. Dr. Waterland renders it, Thou hast drawn me up, namely, out of the deep pit, or waters, to which great dangers and afflictions are frequently compared. “The verb is used, in its original meaning, to denote the reciprocating motion of the buckets of a well; one descending as the other rises, and vice versa; and it is here applied with admirable propriety to point out the various reciprocations and changes of David’s fortunes, as described in this Psalm, as to prosperity and adversity; and particularly that gracious reverse of his afflicted condition, which he now celebrates, God having raised him up to great honour and prosperity: for, having built his palace, he perceived that the Lord had established him king over Israel, and that he had exalted his kingdom, for his people Israel’s sake, 2 Samuel 5:21.” — Chandler.


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    Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on Psalms 30:1". Joseph Benson's Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/psalms-30.html. 1857.

    George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

    Ecstacy. This word is not in Hebrew nor in some of the best Greek copies. (Theodoret) --- It seems to be taken from ver. 23., (Calmet) and intimates that the just may recite this psalm in the latter times, (Worthington) when they shall be in the greatest perplexity. (Haydock) --- David composed it when he was obliged to flee from court, (1 Kings xix. 1., and xxvii. 1.; Calmet) or in the desert of Moan, seeing himself in the most imminent danger; (1 Kings xxiii. 25.; Kimchi; Du Pin) though some refer this psalm to the conspiracy of Absalom, (Theodoret; Menochius) or to the unpremeditated fall of David, (Eusebius) or to the captives. (St. Chrysostom) --- Our Saviour repeated part of ver. 6., upon the cross; and he may perhaps be the object of the whole psalm. The Church prescribes only the six first verses to be recited at Complin. (Berthier)


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    Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Psalms 30:1". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/psalms-30.html. 1859.

    E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

    Title. A Psalm. Hebrew. mizmor. See App-65.

    Song. Hebrew. Shir. The only Shir in the first book. See App-65.

    dedication. Hebrew. hanak. Used of houses in Deuteronomy 20:5.

    of the house of David. Compare 2 Samuel 7:1, 2 Samuel 7:2. Not the temple.

    lifted me up = as out of a pit.


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    Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Psalms 30:1". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/psalms-30.html. 1909-1922.

    Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

    I will extol thee, O LORD for thou hast lifted me up, and hast not made my foes to rejoice over me.

    The dedication of the house of David - namely, the site of the future temple which Solomon built. The Hebrew, ch


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    Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Psalms 30:1". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/psalms-30.html. 1871-8.

    Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

    (1) Thou hast lifted me up.—The Hebrew word seems to mean to dangle, and therefore may be used either of letting down or drawing up. The cognate noun means bucket It is used in Exodus 2:19, literally of drawing water from a well; in Proverbs 20:5, metaphorically of counsel. Here it is clearly metaphorical of restoration from sickness, and does not refer to the incident in Jeremiah’s life (Jeremiah 38:13), where quite a different word is used.


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    Bibliography
    Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Psalms 30:1". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/psalms-30.html. 1905.

    Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

    I will extol thee, O LORD; for thou hast lifted me up, and hast not made my foes to rejoice over me.
    A. M. 2987. B.C. 1017. (Title.) A psalm. Or, "A psalm or song of David, at the dedication of the house;" by which is supposed to be meant the place he built on the threshing floor of Araunah, after the grievous plague which had nearly desolated the kingdom
    2 Samuel 24:25; 1 Chronicles 21:6
    at the
    Deuteronomy 20:5; 2 Samuel 5:11; 6:20; 7:2; 20:3
    extol
    34:3,4; 66:17; 145:1; Daniel 4:37
    for
    27:6; 28:9
    hast not
    13:4; 25:2; 35:19,24,25; 41:11; 79:4,10; 89:41-46; 140:8; Lamentations 2:15

    Copyright Statement
    These files are public domain.
    Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

    Bibliography
    Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Psalms 30:1". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/psalms-30.html.

    Ver. 1. I wilt exalt Thee, O Lord, for Thou hast exalted me, and hast not permitted my foes to rejoice over me. Muis: "I will praise thee, is followed in the second clause by the ground, why he desires to praise God; and he expands this in the two following verses, for the purpose of shoving how great is his obligation to praise Him." The three verses are bound together as one whole; by the thrice-repeated address to God. The first clause, "I will exalt Thee," stands in manifest reference to the second, "because Thou hast exalted me." Calvin: "Because he was, as it were, exalted from the grave to the vital air, he promises that he will exalt the name, of God. For as God exalts on high by His hand when we are sunk in the deep, so it is, on the other hand, our duty to exalt His praise with heart and lips." The term דלה, properly to draw water, is explained by the circumstance, that the calamity is represented under the figure of a deep well, into which the Psalmist had sunk. That we are not to dream of a literal rendering, is manifest from the (Psalms 30:3) 3d verse, "Thou hast brought up my soul from the grave;" and from Psalms 30:2, where "Thou hast drawn me up" corresponds to "Thou hast healed me." שמה with ל designates, according to the connection, malicious pleasure. It signifies, properly, to rejoice at any one, so that the joy pertains to him, or bears reference to him. David's enemies, like those of every pious king, were the numerous enemies of the Lord,—the ungodly: compare 2 Samuel 12:14, "Because by this deed thou hast given great occasion to the enemies of the Lord to blaspheme, the child also that is born unto thee shall surely die." As these had hitherto contemplated with envy the previous manifestations of the grace of God towards him, so now they derived a peculiar gratification from the calamity with which he had been visited. They hoped that he would now be utterly destroyed—a consummation which they had in vain looked for in the days of Absalom. This hope was frustrated, when they saw that God had forgiven the infirmity of His repentant servant, and that He did not destroy him along with the ungodly.


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    These files are public domain.
    Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

    Bibliography
    Hengstenberg, Ernst. "Commentary on Psalms 30:1". Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/heg/psalms-30.html.

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