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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Psalms 30:11

 

 

You have turned for me my mourning into dancing; You have loosed my sackcloth and girded me with gladness,

Adam Clarke Commentary

Thou hast turned - my mourning into dancing - Rather into piping. I have not prayed in vain. Though I deserved to be cut off from the land of the living, yet thou hast spared me, and the remnant of my people. Thou hast taken away my sackcloth, the emblem of my distress and misery, and girded me with gladness, when thou didst say to the destroying angel, when he stood over Jerusalem ready to destroy it: "It is enough, stay now thy hand;" 2 Samuel 24:16.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Psalms 30:11". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/psalms-30.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Thou hast turned for me - In my behalf. That is, God had heard his prayer; he had brought his troubles to an end; he had caused his sorrows to be succeeded by correspondent joy.

My mourning into dancing - Joy, exultation, every expression of rejoicing, had been made to succeed his deep sorrows. Compare Psalm 30:5. It was this which he commemorated at the dedication of his house; this joy succeeding scenes of sorrow that he now called to remembrance as he entered the place which he had reared for a permanent abode. The contrast of his circumstances now - in a palace, with every comfort of plenty and peace around him - with his former circumstances which had been so sad, made it proper for him thus to celebrate the goodness of God.

Thou hast put off my sackcloth - That which I wore, or had girded around me, as an emblem of sorrow, or in the time of my mourning. See Isaiah 3:24, note; Job 16:15, note; and Matthew 11:21, note.

And girded me with gladness - Instead of a girdle of sackcloth he had been clothed in a festive dress, or with such a dress - girded with an elegant girdle - as was worn on joyous and festive occasions. See the notes at Matthew 5:38-41.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Psalms 30:11". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/psalms-30.html. 1870.

Coffman's Commentaries on the Bible

SUDDEN RELIEF; ABOUNDING JOY; PRAISE GOD FOREVER

"Thou hast turned for me; my mourning into dancing;

Thou hast loosed my sackcloth, and girded me with gladness;

To the end that my glory may sing praise to thee and be not silent.

O Jehovah my God, I will give thanks unto thee forever."

"Thou hast turned" (Psalms 30:11). What had happened so quickly? The explanation is in 2 Samuel 24:18, which records how God sent the Prophet Gad to David with word that the plague was ended.

"Thou hast loosed my sackcloth" (Psalms 30:11). "That the king had clothed himself in sackcloth upon this occasion is mentioned in 1 Chronicles 21:16,"[20] the same being another evidence that this psalm is tied to that event.

"That my glory may sing praise to thee, and not be silent" (Psalms 30:12). Perhaps the RSV should be followed here, where the rendition is, "That my soul may praise thee, and not be silent."

Adam Clarke preferred the rendition in KJV, which is followed in our version (American Standard Version). He interpreted it to mean that the wealth, splendor, and glory of David's kingdom were here pledged by the king to be employed in praising the Lord. "Once my glory sang praise to itself; now it shall be employed for another purpose; it shall give thanks to God and never be silent."[21] There is the possibility that the older versions are correct.


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James Burton Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.

Bibliography
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Psalms 30:11". "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/psalms-30.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Those hast turned for me my mourning into dancing,.... This, with what follows, expresses the success he had in seeking the Lord by prayer and supplication; there was a sudden change of things, as it often is with the people of God; sometimes they are mourning by reason of sin, their own and others; or on account of afflictions; or because of spiritual decays; or through the temptations of Satan; or, as it was the case of the psalmist now, because of the hidings of God's face; but this mourning is exchanged for joy and gladness when the Lord discovers his pardoning love, revives his work in their souls, takes off his afflicting hand from them, rebukes the tempter, and delivers out of his temptations, and shows himself, his grace and favour;

thou hast put off my sackcloth; which was used in mourning for relations, and in times of calamity and distress, and as a token of humiliation and repentance, Genesis 37:34;

and girded me with gladness; by these phrases the same thing is signified as before; see Isaiah 61:3.


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Psalms 30:11". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/psalms-30.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

sackcloth — was used, even by kings, in distress (1 Chronicles 21:16; Isaiah 37:1) but “gladness,” used for a garment, shows the language to be figurative.


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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Psalms 30:11". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/psalms-30.html. 1871-8.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Thou hast turned for me my mourning into dancing: thou hast put off my sackcloth, and girded me with gladness;

Sackcloth — Given me occasion to put off that sackcloth, which they used to wear in times of mourning, Esther 4:1; Psalm 35:13; Isaiah 32:11; Joel 1:13.

Girded — With joy, as with a garment, surrounding me on every side.


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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Psalms 30:11". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/psalms-30.html. 1765.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

11.Thou hast turned my mourning into dancing. David concludes the psalm as he had begun it, with thanksgiving. He affirms that it was by the help and blessing of God that he had escaped safe; and he then adds, that the final object of his escape was, that he might employ the rest of his life in celebrating the praises of God. Moreover, he shows us that he was not insensible or obdurate under his afflictions, but mourned in heaviness and sorrow; and he also shows that his very mourning had been the means of leading him to pray to God to deprecate his wrath. Both these points are most worthy of our observation, in order, first, that we may not suppose that the saints are guilty of stoical insensibility, depriving them of all feeling of grief; and, secondly, that we may perceive that in their mourning they were exercised to repentance. This latter he denotes by the term sackcloth. It was a common practice among the ancients to clothe themselves with sackcloth when mourning, (633) for no other reason, indeed, than that like guilty criminals, they might approach their heavenly Judge, imploring his forgiveness with all humility, and testifying by this clothing their humiliation and dissatisfaction with themselves. (634) We know also that the orientals were addicted beyond all others to ceremonies. We perceive, therefore, that David, although he patiently submitted himself to God, was not free from grief. We also see that his sorrow was “after a godly sort,” as Paul speaks, (2 Corinthians 7:10;) for to testify his penitence he clothed himself with sackcloth. By the term dancing, he does not mean any wanton or profane leaping, but a sober and holy exhibition of joy like that which sacred Scripture mentions when David conveyed the ark of the covenant to its place, (2 Samuel 6:16.) If we may conjecture, however, we may gather from this, that the great danger of which David speaks in this psalm is by some improperly restricted to sickness, as it was very improbable that he would put on sackcloth when he was confined to a sick-bed. This, indeed, would not be a sufficient reason of itself, but in a doubtful case, as this is, it is not destitute of force. David therefore means, that, laying aside his mourning apparel, he returned from a state of heaviness and sorrow to joy; and this he ascribes to the grace of God alone, asserting that he had been his deliverer.


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Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Psalms 30:11". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/psalms-30.html. 1840-57.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Psalms 30:11 Thou hast turned for me my mourning into dancing: thou hast put off my sackcloth, and girded me with gladness;

Ver. 11. Thou hast turned for me my mourning, &c.] Sustulisti luctum, et laetitiam attulisti. {See Trapp on "Psalms 30:5"}


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Psalms 30:11". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/psalms-30.html. 1865-1868.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Having related his prayer, he now declares the gracious answer which God gave him.

Put off my sackcloth, i.e. given me occasion to put off that sackcloth, which they used to wear in times of mourning. See Esther 4:1 Psalms 35:13 Isaiah 32:11 Joel 1:13.

With gladness; either with garments of gladness or rejoicing; or with joy, as with a garment surrounding me on every side; as he is for the like reason said to be girded with strength, Psalms 18:32.


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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Psalms 30:11". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/psalms-30.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

11. Dancing—This is not to be taken literally. “Dancing, here, is poetical of joy, or shouts of joythanksgiving and songs.”Hupfeld. See this usage in Jeremiah 31:4; Jeremiah 31:13; Lamentations 4:15. This sense is confirmed by the parallel word “gladness,” in next hemistich. The Hebrews, especially the women, sang responsively and danced upon great festive occasions, as in Exodus 15; Judges 5; 1 Samuel 18:6-7; 2 Samuel 6:14; 2 Samuel 6:16; but dancing was never permanently attached to their religious worship. See notes on Psalms 42:4; Psalms 149:3


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Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Psalms 30:11". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/psalms-30.html. 1874-1909.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

Psalms 30:11. Thou hast turned for me, &c. — Having related his prayer, he now declares the gracious answer which God gave him. Thou hast put off my sackcloth — Hast given me occasion to put it off, alluding to the sackcloth which they used to wear in times of mourning, and with which possibly, in an humble compliance with the divine providence, David had clothed himself, in his distress; or, perhaps, he speaks figuratively, and only means that God had taken away his sorrow with the causes of it. And girded me with gladness — Either with garments of gladness, or rejoicing: or with joy, as with a garment, surrounding me on every side; as Psalms 18:32, for a similar reason he is said to be girded with strength.


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Bibliography
Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on Psalms 30:11". Joseph Benson's Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/psalms-30.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Poverty. Septuagint have read ani instead of haoni, "my iniquity," which seems less accurate, as David had not offended Saul. Symmachus has "malice," (Calmet) or "ill-treatment," Greek: kakosin. (Haydock) --- We may form some judgment of David's distress, from his being obliged to eat the consecrated bread at Nobe. (Calmet) --- Yet without making any change to the Hebrew, we may explain it in the sense of the Vulgate, as ave signifies to be "bent down." (Berthier) --- "Chastisements waste my strength." (Pr. disc.) --- Jesus was a man of sorrows. (Berthier)


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Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Psalms 30:11". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/psalms-30.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

turned: denoting the act. See "girded", below.

put off = torn open, or off.

sackcloth. Put by Figure of speech Metonymy (of Adjunct), App-6, for the sadness of which it was the sign.

girded: denoting the fact. See "turned", above.


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Psalms 30:11". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/psalms-30.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Thou hast turned for me my mourning into dancing: thou hast put off my sackcloth, and girded me with gladness;

Thou hast turned ... - (cf. Psalms 30:5.)

Sackcloth - the robe symbolical of humble penitence, which David and the elders had assumed under God's visitation on the people, because of David's pride in numbering them; an undesigned coincidence with 1 Chronicles 21:16, "David and the elders of Israel ... clothed in sackcloth, fell upon their faces."


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Psalms 30:11". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/psalms-30.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(11) Thou hast turned for me.—This verse gives the answer to the prayer. Mourning is literally beating the breast, and therefore dancing forms a proper parallelism; or else, according to one derivation of the word, machôl would suggest piping. (See margin, Psalms 149:3; Psalms 150:4; see Smith’s Bible Dictionary, under “Dance;” and Bible Educator, vol. ii., p. 70; and comp. Note to Song of Solomon 6:13.)


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Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Psalms 30:11". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/psalms-30.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Thou hast turned for me my mourning into dancing: thou hast put off my sackcloth, and girded me with gladness;
turned
5; 126:1,2; Genesis 37:35; 45:28; 2 Chronicles 20:3,9,12,27,28; Esther 9:22; Isaiah 25:8; 3; Isaiah 66:10,11; John 16:20; Revelation 7:14-17; 21:4
dancing
149:3; 150:4; 2 Samuel 6:14; Ecclesiastes 3:4; Jeremiah 31:4,13,14
girded
Nehemiah 8:10; Isaiah 61:3,10; Luke 15:22

Copyright Statement
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Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Psalms 30:11". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/psalms-30.html.

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