corner graphic

Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Psalms 30:3

 

 

O LORD, You have brought up my soul from Sheol; You have kept me alive, that I would not go down to the pit.

Adam Clarke Commentary

Thou hast brought up my soul from the grave - I and my people were both about to be cut off, but thou hast spared us in mercy, and given us a most glorious respite.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Psalms 30:3". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/psalms-30.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

O, Lord, thou hast brought up my soul from the grave - My life; me. The meaning is, that he had been in imminent danger of death, and had been brought from the borders of the grave. The word here rendered “grave” is “Sheol” - a word which, properly used, commonly denotes the region of the dead; the underworld which is entered through the grave. Compare Isaiah 14:9, note; Psalm 6:5, note.

Thou hast kept me alive, that I should not go down to the pit - More literally, “thou hast caused me to live from them which go down to the pit;” that is, thou hast distinguished me from them by keeping me alive. The word “pit” here means the same as the grave. See the notes at Psalm 28:1.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Psalms 30:3". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/psalms-30.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

O Lord, thou hast brought up my soul from the grave,.... When his life being in danger, was near unto it, Job 33:22; otherwise the soul dies not, nor does it lie and sleep in the grave; or "thou hast brought up my soul from hell"F13מן שאול "ab inferno", V. L. Pagninus, Montanus, Gejerus, Michaelis; so Ainsworth. ; that is, delivered him from those horrors of conscience and terrors of mind, by reason of sin, which were as hell itself unto him; see Psalm 116:3;

thou hast kept me alive: preserved his corporeal life when in danger, and maintained his spiritual life; and quickened him by his word, under all his afflictions, and kept him from utter and black despair;

that I should not go down to the pit; either of the grave or hell. There is in this clause a "Keri" and a "Cetib"; a marginal reading, and a textual writing: according to the latter it is, "from them that go down to the pit"; which some versionsF14So Sept. V. L. Pagninus, Musculus, Gejerus, Michaelis, Ainsworth. follow; that is, thou hast preserved me from going along with them, and being where and as they are: our version follows the former; the sense is the same.


Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Psalms 30:3". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/psalms-30.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

O LORD, thou hast brought up my d soul from the grave: thou hast kept me alive, that I should not go down to the pit.

(d) Meaning, that he escaped death most narrowly.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Psalms 30:3". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/psalms-30.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

The terms describe extreme danger.

soul — or, “myself.”

grave — literally, “hell,” as in Psalm 16:10.

hast kept me … pit — quickened or revived me from the state of dying (compare Psalm 28:1).


Copyright Statement
These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Psalms 30:3". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/psalms-30.html. 1871-8.

Scofield's Reference Notes

grave

Heb. "Sheol," (See Scofield "Habakkuk 2:5").


Copyright Statement
These files are considered public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available in the Online Bible Software Library.

Bibliography
Scofield, C. I. "Scofield Reference Notes on Psalms 30:3". "Scofield Reference Notes (1917 Edition)". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/srn/psalms-30.html. 1917.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Psalms 30:3 O LORD, thou hast brought up my soul from the grave: thou hast kept me alive, that I should not go down to the pit.

Ver. 3. O Lord, thou hast brought up, &c.] Here he saith the same again as before; the better to set forth the greatness of the benefit, and so to excite himself to due thankfulness. The uttermost extremity of a calamity is to be acknowledged after we are delivered out of it, Isaiah 38:10.

Thou hast kept me alive] Thou hast rescued me from instant death; and this I look upon as a resurrection from the dead.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Psalms 30:3". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/psalms-30.html. 1865-1868.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Thou hast brought up my soul from the grave; my deliverance is a kind of resurrection from the grave, upon the very brink whereof I was.

Thou hast kept me alive: this he adds to explain the former phrase, which was ambiguous.

To the pit, i.e. into the grave, which is oft called the pit, as Psalms 28:1 69:15 88:4 Isaiah 38:17.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Psalms 30:3". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/psalms-30.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

3. Brought up… from the grave… the pit—The sweeping pestilence had brought him and the nation to the grave’s mouth. See 2 Samuel 24:15-17


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Psalms 30:3". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/psalms-30.html. 1874-1909.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

A God. Hebrew, "a rock of strength." Septuagint, "a God who holdeth his shield over me," Greek: uperaspisten. (Haydock) --- Refuge. Hebrew, "fortress." (Calmet)


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Psalms 30:3". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/psalms-30.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

soul. Hebrew. nephesh. App-13.

the grave. Hebrew Sheol. See App-35.

that I should not go down. So in some codices and one early printed edition; but other codices read "from among" [those who were going down], with Septuagint, Syriac, and Vulgate.

the pit = a sepulchre. Hebrew. bor. See note on "well" (Genesis 21:19).


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Psalms 30:3". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/psalms-30.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

O LORD, thou hast brought up my soul from the grave: thou hast kept me alive, that I should not go down to the pit.

Thou hast brought up ... - Hebrew, Sheol; Greek, Hades, the unseen world. David, through overwhelming grief at the calamity which his sinful pride had brought upon the people, had been (2 Samuel 24:10; 2 Samuel 24:14; 2 Samuel 24:17) as it were dead, though still living (cf. 2 Corinthians 1:10; Psalms 6:6-7).

Kept me alive ... This is the reading of the Qeri', or Hebrew margin [ miyaar


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Psalms 30:3". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/psalms-30.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(3) Grave.—Sheôl (See Note to Psalms 6:5.)

That I should not go down to the pit.—This follows a reading which is considered by modern scholars ungrammatical. The ordinary reading, rightly kept by the LXX. and Vulg., means from these going down to the pit, i.e., from the dead. (Comp. Psalms 28:1.)


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Psalms 30:3". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/psalms-30.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

O LORD, thou hast brought up my soul from the grave: thou hast kept me alive, that I should not go down to the pit.
brought
16:10; 40:1,2; 56:13; 71:20; 86:13; *marg:; 116:8; Job 33:19-22,28; Isaiah 38:17,18; Jonah 2:4-6
down
28:1

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Psalms 30:3". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/psalms-30.html.

Ver. 3. O Lord, Thou hast brought up my soul from hell; Thou hast brought me alive from among those who go down to the pit. David had been brought near death, through grief, on account of the sufferings in which his criminal conduct had involved his people: compare on Psalms 6:6-7. He was, as it were, dead, though still literally alive: compare 2 Corinthians 10. Calvin: "He thought that he could not otherwise adequately describe the greatness of the favour of God, than by comparing the darkness of that time to that of the grave and the pit." In reference to יוֹרְדֵי בוֹר, compare on Psalms 28:1. "From those," is "taking me out of the number of those." The marginal reading מִיָּרְדִי, "from my going down," that is, "so that I may not go down," is to be decidedly rejected. For the infinitive of ירד, is always רדת (compare Psalms 30:9), and the Psalmist represents himself in the first clause as one who had already sunk to Sheol. The Masorites made the change because they could not understand how the Psalmist reckoned himself among the dead.

After this short glance at the circumstances, there follows in the (Psalms 30:4) 4th and (Psalms 30:5) 5th verses the announcement of the kernel of the doctrine which they contain, which extends far beyond the range of individual and personal experience, and is of importance to the whole community of believers. These are exhorted to concur in the praise of the Psalmist for the deliverance vouchsafed to him, because it gloriously illustrates the nature of God.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Hengstenberg, Ernst. "Commentary on Psalms 30:3". Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/heg/psalms-30.html.

To report dead links, typos, or html errors or suggestions about making these resources more useful use our convenient contact form
Powered by Lightspeed Technology