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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Psalms 42:3

 

 

My tears have been my food day and night, While they say to me all day long, "Where is your God?"

Adam Clarke Commentary

My tears have been my meat day and night - My longing has been so intense after spiritual blessings, that I have forgotten to take my necessary food; and my sorrow has been so great, that I have had no appetite for any. I feel more for the honor of my God and his truth than for myself, when the idolaters, who have thy people in captivity, insultingly cry, Where is thy God?


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Psalms 42:3". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/psalms-42.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

My tears have been my meat - The word rendered tears in this place is in the singular number, and means literally weeping. Compare Psalm 39:12. The word meat here means literally bread, and is used in the general signification of food, as the word meat is always used in the English version of the Bible. The English word meat, which originally signified food, has been changed gradually in its signification, until it now denotes in common usage animal food, or flesh. The idea here is, that instead of eating, he had wept. The state described is that which occurs so often when excessive sorrow takes away the appetite, or destroys the relish for food, and occasions fasting. This was the foundation of the whole idea of fasting - that sorrow, and especially sorrow for sin, takes away the desire for food for the time, and leads to involuntary abstinence. Hence arose the correlative idea of abstaining from food with a view to promote that deep sense of sin, or to produce a condition of the body which would be favorable to a proper recollection of guilt.

Day and night - Constantly; without intermission. See the notes at Psalm 1:2. “While they continually say unto me.” While it is constantly said to me; that is, by mine enemies. See Psalm 42:10.

Where is thy God? - See Psalm 3:2; Psalm 22:8. The meaning here is, “He seems to be utterly forsaken or abandoned by God. He trusted in God. He professed to be his friend. He looked to him as his protector. But he is now forsaken, as if he had no God; and God is treating him as if he were none of his; as if he had no love for him, and no concern about his welfare.”


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Psalms 42:3". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/psalms-42.html. 1870.

The Biblical Illustrator

Psalms 42:3

My tears have been my meat day and night, while they continually say unto me, Where is thy God?
.

Where is thy God?

Surely a searching, solemn query. Not a question, notice, of having, or not having, a god; not a question as to what, but where? Every man has some kind of god, for the religious instinct is an important part of every man’s constitutional make-up. Every child is born with the germ of conscience. It must be so, else why do we find in our children a chord that vibrates at the touch of religious story or appeal? Upon our idea of God centres our ideas of religion, of sin, of prayer, of consecration, and of service.

I. Your religion will be whatever your idea of God is. Religion has two acts--to know what is true of God, and to express that knowledge in life. It is personal experience that gives life to one’s creed, not cold type. A blind man’s world can be measured with a cane. But to be able to say, “Now I see,” speedily leads on to “I believe that Thou art the Christ, the Son of the living God.” Experience is the soil out of which the best creeds grow. Conduct must tally with conviction.

II. Your idea of sin will be shaped by your idea of God. They stand or fall together. The exceeding sinfulness of sin will never fill you with shrinking abhorrence until you see God as a God of holiness and purity and righteousness. If your idea of God be that of the Pantheist, or that of the philosopher, or that of the materialist, your standard of holiness will rise no higher than your idea of God. What greater reason can we have for hating sin than to know that it drove the nails into the hands of our blessed Lord?

III. Your idea of the value of prayer will hinge upon your idea of God. Look at David’s prayer: “My soul thirsteth for God, for the living God.” How could David utter a prayer like that if he believed God to be an impersonal force at work in the universe? The value and power of true prayer lies in its reflex action of the man who prays. You cannot say “our Father” to an impersonal force; nor hold sweet communion with a law, nor pour out your soul’s need to a sacred cow. The Pharisee prayed with himself. The Publican talked with God. Penitence is heaven’s latch-key. So, too, prayer becomes a good test of character. To prove it, note the objects for which many people pray; the temper in which they pray; the regularity with which they pray, and the period during which they pray.

IV. Your conception of consecration will rest upon your idea of God. To say, “I do now consecrate myself to the service of Christ,” is the most solemn thing you can say. You remember what “consecration” meant to the high priest of old. That it must mean to you and me; for anything less noble, less sacred, is unworthy the professed follower of the Master.

V. Your idea of christian service will depend upon your idea of God. If every man of us is to be judged according to the light he has, how can any one afford to spend his time picking out flaws in his neighbour’s conduct, instead of improving the little span of life that God has given him by whole-hearted devotion to the service of God. If you believe in the Church as a Divinely-ordained institution, and in the preaching of the Gospel as the Divinely-ordained means of bringing this world back to God; and if you believe that God is able and willing to forgive your sins and to cleanse you from your iniquity, then I call heaven and earth to witness against you that, so long as you hold back your whole-hearted allegiance from Him, you are trifling, you are trifling with God! (C. H. Jones.)

Where is thy God?

This is a question which, in every age, the doubting heart has propounded to itself; and every time it recurs it bespeaks a deeper agony of soul, and demands a profounder answer. The contradictions of our life can neither be ignored nor annihilated. But all depends on how we view the whole--whether in the gloom of despondency, or the shining light of hope. If God is with us anywhere and ever, then everywhere and always. Not only in the height of our exultation, but in the depth of grief and woe. Not only in the glad communion of our sweetest fellowship, but in the chilly isolation of our sheer bereavement. In all the evils of existence--in shame and crime and want--we must believe he is no further from us than in plenty and peace and virtuous delight. There are periods of depression incidental to all flesh, when all around is gloomy, and the outlook drear and blank; when the joys of life appear so few, so fleeting, and so faded: when sin and suffering seem so vast and sure, our lot so hard and burdensome, our whole existence so beset with toil, that the pulse of the spirit beats feeble, faint and low, and the dead weight of sombre misgiving clips the pinions which we spread, and drags us downward to despondency. At such times we learn the value of example. We call to mind the stories we have heard of peaceful death-beds and triumphant departures. We think of Socrates, with the cup of hemlock in his hand, discoursing sweetly--like the dying swan, his noblest strain his last--concerning the immortality of the soul. We think of Christian martyrs and the saints of old. We see them dying for divergent creeds, yet all alike serene. They walked by faith, not by sight; and therefore they were strong. And anon, as we review that noble host, there rises one above the rest, who is the chief among ten thousand, and the leader of an army by Himself. Who was a man of sorrows, who was acquainted with grief, like this our elder brother, the despised and rejected of men? Are our discouragements to be compared to His? If in the midst of a priest-ridden world, a corrupt and worn-out society, even out of the unpromising materials which were all that lay ready to His hand, He never relinquished His sublime idea of building up the kingdom of God, shall we not also rise above our griefs, and lift the drooping head--we in whose cup is mingled that more even measure that God metes out to ordinary men? There is nothing so bad but it may be well, if we wait to see the end. But oh, the good which we discern already! what shall explain that away? The mere refusal of our hearts to acquiesce in despondency--whence comes it, if not from a God in whose embrace we lie secure? The desire which springs spontaneous, like the fountain in the desert, to help and befriend the distressed; the anodyne of sympathy, and the balm of compassion, which gushes in most abundance where sorest need prevails; the love which many waters cannot quench; the devotion of a mother; the attachment of a child; all that makes suffering tender, and sheds beauty upon grief--are these no signs of God? Signs! They are more. They are the beating of a universal pulse, the breathing of a universal soul; they constitute the Godhead of the World. And when we have once discovered the great Father in our hearts, we may go forth courageously to find Him everywhere. (E. M. Geldart, M. A.)


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Bibliography
Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "Psalms 42:3". The Biblical Illustrator. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/psalms-42.html. 1905-1909. New York.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

My tears have been my meat day and night,.... That is, he could not eat for sorrow, like Hannah,

1Sa 1:7,8; or while he was eating tears fell in plenty, and they were as common, day and night, as his food, and mixed with itF6"--lachrymaeque alimenta fuere", Ovid. Metamorph. l. 10. Fab. 1. v. 75. ; see Psalm 80:5;

while they continually say unto me, his enemies the Philistines,

where is thy God? theirs were to be seen and pointed at, as the host of heaven, the sun, moon, and stars, and idols of gold, silver, brass, wood, and stone; wherefore they ask, where was his? but David's God was invisible; he is in the heavens, and does what he pleases, Psalm 115:2; or the sense is, that if there was such a God he believed in and professed, and he was his servant, surely he would never have suffered him to fall into so much distress and calamity, but would have appeared for his relief and deliverance; and therefore tauntingly, and by way of reproach, ask where he was.


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Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Psalms 42:3". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/psalms-42.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

c My tears have been my meat day and night, while they continually say unto me, Where [is] thy God?

(c) As others take pleasure in eating and drinking, so he was altogether given to weeping.

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Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Psalms 42:3". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/psalms-42.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Where is thy God? — implying that He had forsaken him (compare 2 Samuel 16:7; Psalm 3:2; Psalm 22:8).


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Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Psalms 42:3". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/psalms-42.html. 1871-8.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

3.My tears have been my bread Here the Psalmist mentions another sharp piercing shaft with which the wicked and malevolent grievously wounded his heart. There can be no doubt that Satan made use of such means as these to fan the flame that consumed him with grief. “What,” we may suppose that adversary to say, “wouldst thou have? Seest thou not that God hath cast thee off? For certainly he desires to be worshipped in the tabernacle, to which you have now no opportunity of access, and from which you are as it were banished.” These were violent assaults, and enough to have overturned the faith of this holy man, unless, supported by the power of the Spirit in a more than ordinary degree, he had made a strong and vigorous resistance. It is evident that his feelings had been really and strongly affected. We may be often agitated, and yet not to such an extent as to abstain from eating and drinking; but when a man voluntarily abstains from food, and indulges so much in weeping, that he daily neglects his ordinary meals, and is continually overwhelmed in sorrow, it is obvious that he is troubled in no light degree; but that he is wounded severely, and even to the heart. (115) Now, David says, that he did not experience greater relief in any thing whatever than from weeping; and, therefore, he gave himself up to it, just in the same manner as men take pleasure and enjoyment in eating; and this he says had been the case every day, and not only for a short time. Let us, therefore, whenever the ungodly triumph over us in our miseries, and spitefully taunt us that God is against us, never forget that it is Satan who moves them to speak in this manner, in order to overthrow our faith; and that, therefore, it is not time for us to take our ease, or to yield to indifference, when a war so dangerous is waged against us. There is still another reason which ought to inspire us with such feelings, and it is this, that the name of God is held up to scorn by the ungodly; for they cannot scoff at our faith without greatly reproaching him. If, then, we are not altogether insensible, we must in such circumstances be affected with the deepest sorrow.


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Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Psalms 42:3". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/psalms-42.html. 1840-57.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Psalms 42:3 My tears have been my meat day and night, while they continually say unto me, Where [is] thy God?

Ver. 3. My tears have been my meat day and night] Hunters say the hart sheddeth tears, or something like tears, when he is pursued, and not able to escape. Hereunto David might allude. Sure it is, that as hinds calving, so men, by weeping, cast out their sorrows, Job 39:3.

Expletur lachrymis egeriturque dolor.

And, Affert solatium lugentibus suspiriorum societas, saith Basil, sighs are an ease of sorrow. Of Mr Bradford the martyr it is reported, that in the midst of dinner he used oft to muse, having his hat over his eyes, from whence came commonly plenty of tears dropping on his trencher. - αγαθοι δ αριδακρυες ανθρες. The better any are, the more inclined to weeping; as David than Jonathan, 1 Samuel 20:41 Here we have him telling us that his tears were his meat, so Psalms 80:5, or his bread, as Gregory readeth it; and he giveth this reason, that, like as the more bread we eat the dryer we are, and the more thirsty; so the more tears of godly sorrow we let fall the more we thirst after that living fountain springing from above. David’s greatest grief was, that he was banished from the sanctuary; and next to that, the reproachful blasphemy of his enemies hitting him in the teeth with his God, as if not able or not willing to relieve him now in his necessity, and bitterly upbraiding him with his hopes as altogether vain.

Whiles they continually say unto me, Where is thy God?] Violenti certe impetus, saith Vatablus here. These were violent shocks indeed; and such as wherewith David’s faith might have been utterly overthrown, had it not been the better rooted, and with it upheld, by the special power of the Spirit of grace. Other of God’s suffering saints have met with the like measure. At Orleans, in France, as the bloody Papists murdered the Protestants, they cried out, Where is now your God? What is become of all your prayers and psalms now? Let your God that you called upon save you if he can. Others sang in scorn, Judge and revenge my cause, O Lord; others, Have mercy on us, Lord, &c. The queen mother of Scotland, having received aid from France, forced the Protestants for a while to retire to the highlands, whereupon she scoffingly said, Where is now John Knox’s God? My God is now stronger than his, yea, even in Life; but her brags lasted not long; for within a few days six hundred Protestants beat above four thousand French and Scots, &c. (Mr Knox’s Life, by Mr Clark). God’s servants fare the better for the insolencies of their enemies; who, when they say, Where is now their God? might as well say between the time of the new and old moon, Where is now the moon? when as it is never nearer the sun than at that time.


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Psalms 42:3". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/psalms-42.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Psalms 42:3. My tears have been my meat day and night i.e. "I am wholly given over to grief and sorrow, whilst I hear the continual reproaches of mine enemies, saying unto me, What is become of thy God, in whom thou wast wont to repose so much confidence?" See Archbishop Sharp's Sermons, vol. 3: p. 2, &c.


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Bibliography
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Psalms 42:3". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/psalms-42.html. 1801-1803.

Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary

What a striking difference is here made between the gracious soul longing after Jesus, and the heart that can take up and rest satisfied with anything but Jesus. Ordinances will not fill the soul, unless Jesus be found in the ordinances. It is a God in Christ the soul wants; and when this is not experienced, tears will denote the soul's disappointment. And yet those very tears prove that Jesus is still with his people, though, like the disciples at Emmaus, the eye of the soul is holden so as not to know him. Luke 24:16. Reader, the tear called forth by grace is like the spiced wine of the pomegranate, Song of Solomon 8:2. If David composed this Psalm, as some have thought, when driven from Jerusalem by the rebellion of his son Absalom, and referred to the taunts of Shimei as he went up the hill of mount Olivet weeping as he went, (2 Samuel 15:30; 2Sa_24:25) still I venture to think, that as this was the very mountain after ages made sacred by the afflictions of Jesus, we ought to keep in view the master more than the servant, who certainly was in this, as well as in numberless other instances a lively type of Jesus.


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Hawker, Robert, D.D. "Commentary on Psalms 42:3". "Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/pmc/psalms-42.html. 1828.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

My tears have been my meat; which notes both the great abundance and constant course of his tears, and the secret satisfaction and ease which he found in giving vent to his passion this way. Possibly his tears and grief took away his appetite, and so were to him instead of food.

Where is thy God, of whom thou hast so often boasted, as of one so able and ready to help all that trust in him and call upon him, and particularly as one engaged to time by many great and special promises? He is gone and departed from thee, and no where to be found of thee. He is either unable or unwilling to help thee, or regardless of thee.


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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Psalms 42:3". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/psalms-42.html. 1685.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

‘My tears have been my food day and night,

While they continually say to me,

Where is your God?’

Indeed so powerful are his feelings that he describes himself as weeping day and night so as to satisfy his emotional state, because his enemies taunt him continually about the fact that God does not help him (compare Psalms 42:10). His desire to join in worship with God’s people was so great that he could not stop thinking about it, and weeping over his loss. Reference to the words of his captors may suggest that even in his present condition he had been testifying about the greatness and splendour of his God. It may also indicate that he was being kept short of food. His tears were his food.


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Pett, Peter. "Commentary on Psalms 42:3". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/psalms-42.html. 2013.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

3. Tears have been my meat—Because their ceaseless flow mingled with his food. Psalms 80:5; Psalms 102:9.

Where is thy God—This was not the taunt of atheists or heathen, but of men who believed in the Hebrew theism, and affected to believe God had abandoned David. See Psalms 41:8; Psalms 71:11


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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Psalms 42:3". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/psalms-42.html. 1874-1909.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Light, your Messias, as the Jews confess, (Jarchi) truth, the holy Spirit. (St. Chrysostom) --- Both the titles may be applied to our Saviour. (Berthier) (St. Jerome) --- We are in the utmost distress; be pleased to send us relief. (Calmet) --- As thou hast sent Christ into the world to impart these graces, grant that we may know, and comply with our duties, before we approach to they holy altar. --- Holy hill, the Church, (Worthington) or tabernacle on Sion, where the Jews wished to be present. (Calmet)


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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Psalms 42:3". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/psalms-42.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

continually = all the day.


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Psalms 42:3". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/psalms-42.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

My tears have been my meat day and night, while they continually say unto me, Where is thy God?

My tears have been my meat day and night - I cannot eat with sadness. Instead of "meat," or food, tears are my continual portion, as in Psalms 80:5 (cf. Psalms 102:4; Job 3:24; 1 Samuel 1:7).

While they continually (literally, all the day) say unto me, Where is thy God? - What part hast thou in Him, seeing He casts thee away from His sanctuary? (Psalms 42:10) Though this cavil of his enemies was not always sounding in his bodily ears, yet it rang continually in the ear of his soul; because it found in his despondency, and his self-accusing conscience, a true echo (2 Samuel 15:25-26). His exclusion from the sanctuary he felt peculiarly painful, because it seemed the mark of God's wrath. Compare Shimei's words, "The Lord hath returned upon thee all the blood of the house of Saul," etc. (2 Samuel 16:8; also Psalms 3:2; Psalms 71:11; Psalms 115:2).


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Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Psalms 42:3". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/psalms-42.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(3) My tears.—Comp. Psalms 80:5; Psalms 102:9; and Ovid Metam. x. 75, “Cura dolorque animi lacrimæque alimenta fuere.”

Where is thy God?—For this bitter taunt comp. Psalms 79:10; Psalms 115:2; Joel 2:17, etc.


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Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Psalms 42:3". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/psalms-42.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

My tears have been my meat day and night, while they continually say unto me, Where is thy God?
tears
80:5; 102:9; 2 Samuel 16:12; *marg:
while
10; 3:2; 22:8; 79:10,12; 115:2

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Psalms 42:3". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/psalms-42.html.

Ver. 3. My, tears are my food day and night, while they continually say to me, where is thy God? On the first words J. Arnd. "When one is in great sadness, he cannot eat, his tears become in a manner his food, he drinks and eats, as it were, more tears than bread or other food, as David says in Psalms 80 : thou feedest them with bread of tears, and givest them tears to drink in great measure." That we must expound thus, not with Calvin: "he finds in nothing more consolation, than in tears, they are his refreshment, as others enjoy themselves with food;" nor yet with Stier: "they are my daily bread, and mingle themselves with my daily bread;" that the sense simply is: instead of eating, I drink, appears from the parallel pass. Job 3:24, "for my sighing cometh before I eat," 1 Samuel 1:7, where it is said of Hannah, "she wept and ate not," Psalms 102:4, "I forget to eat my bread." While they say; the speakers, David's enemies, are not more definitely marked, because the allusion bears not upon their person, but only upon their discourse, which found in the Psalmist's feeling so mournful an echo. On the continually ( כל היום signifies here, as always, the whole day, not every day,) Stier remarks: "For although the millers may not incessantly cause such things to be heard, yet the oppressed soul continually hears their raillery clanging in itself." On the words: where is thy God, Calvin: "What wilt thou? Seest thou not, that thou art rejected by God? For assuredly will prayer be made to him in the holy tabernacle, from access to which thou art cut off." But the separation from the sanctuary comes here into consideration only as the pinnacle of the mischief impending over the Psalmist, which the enemies turned to account as a matter-of-fact proof, that he had been cast off by God—comp. Shimei's words in 2 Samuel 16:7-8, Psalms 71:11, Psalms 115:2.


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Bibliography
Hengstenberg, Ernst. "Commentary on Psalms 42:3". Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/heg/psalms-42.html.

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