corner graphic

Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Psalms 42:4

 

 

These things I remember and I pour out my soul within me. For I used to go along with the throng and lead them in procession to the house of God, With the voice of joy and thanksgiving, a multitude keeping festival.

Adam Clarke Commentary

When I remember these things - Or, these things I shall remember. They often occur to me, and sharpen my distressful feelings. My soul is dissolved, becomes weak as water, when I reflect on what I have had, and on what I have lost. Or, I pour out my soul to myself in deep regrets and complaints, when reflecting on these things. I once enjoyed all the ordinances of God, and now I have none. I once had the joyous communion of saints in God's ordinances; but that communion no longer exists, for there are no ordinances to support it. There was a multitude to worship God in public; with these I often went: but alas, this is no more; now there are found only a few solitary individuals who sigh for the desolations of Zion. There we had our holy days, our appointed feasts, to commemorate the wonderful works of the Lord; now there are no processions, no festivals, no joyous assemblies; all is desolation in Zion, and all is mourning in our captivity. I have endeavored to give a general sense to this verse, but there are several difficulties in it; and different commentators and critics have given it a great variety of translations, and as many different meanings. My plan will not permit me to follow them. Much may be seen in Dr. Horsley's work on this verse.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Psalms 42:4". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/psalms-42.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

When I remember these things - These sorrows; this banishment from the house of God; these reproaches of my enemies. The verb used here is in the future tense, and would be appropriately rendered “I will remember these things, and I will pour out my soul within me.” That is, it is not a mere recollection of the past, but it indicates a state or purpose of mind - a solemn resolution to bear these things ever in remembrance, and to allow them to produce a proper impression on his mind and heart that would not be effaced by time. Though the future tense is used as denoting what the state of his mind would be, the immediate reference is to the past. The sorrows and afflictions which had overwhelmed him were the things he would remember.

I pour out my soul in me - Hebrew, upon me. See the notes at Job 30:16. The idea is derived from the fact that the soul in grief seems to be dissolved, or to lose all firmness, consistency, or power, and to be like water. We speak now of the soul as being melted, tender, dissolved, with sympathy or grief, or as overflowing with joy.

For I had gone with the multitude - The word here rendered “multitude” - סך sâk - occurs nowhere else in the Scriptures. It is supposed to denote properly a thicket of trees; a thick wood; and then, a crowd of men. The Septuagint renders it, “I will pass on to the place of the wonderful tabernacle,” σκηνῆς θαυμαστῆς skēnēs thaumastēs So the Latin Vulgate. Luther translates it, “multitude,” Haufen. The Hebrew verb is in the future - “I shall pass,” or “when I pass,” indicating a confident expectation of a favorable issue of his present trials, and referring not to the fact that he had gone with the multitude in time past, but to the fact that he would be permitted to go with them in solemn procession to the house of God, and that then he would recall these things, and pour out his soul in the fullness of his emotions. The Septuagint renders this in the future; so also the Latin Vulgate, DeWette, and Prof. Alexander. Luther renders it, “For I would gladly go hence with the multitude.” It seems clear, therefore, that this does not refer to what had been in the past, but to what he confidently hoped and expected would be in the future. He expected again to go with the multitude to the house of God. Even in his exile, and in his sorrows, he confidently anticipated this, and he says that he would then pour forth the full expression of gratitude - his whole soul - in view of all these things which had occurred. He was now in exile: his heart was overwhelmed with sorrow; he was away from the place of worship - the house of God; he no longer went with others with solemn steps to the sanctuary, but he hoped and expected again to be permitted to do so; and, in view of this, he calls on his soul Psalm 42:5 not to be cast down. This interpretation, referring it to the future, also brings this part of the psalm into harmony with the subsequent part Psalm 42:8, where the author of the psalm confidently expresses the same hope.

I went with them to the house of God - The tabernacle; the place of public worship. See the notes at Psalm 23:6. The Hebrew verb here is also in the future tense, and, in accordance with the interpretation above, the meaning is, “I will go,” etc. The word occurs only here, and in Isaiah 38:15, “I shall go softly all my years.” See the word explained in the notes at that passage. It seems here to be used with reference to a movement in a slow and solemn procession, as in the usual processions connected with public worship among the Hebrews. The meaning is, that he would go with the multitude with seriousness and solemnity, as they went up to the house of God to worship.

With the voice of joy and praise - Chanting hymns to God.

With a multitude that kept holyday - The word here rendered “multitude” - המון hâmôn - is different from that which is employed in the former part of the verse. This is the usual word to denote a multitude. It literally means a noise or sound, as of rain, 1 Kings 18:41; then, a multitude or crowd making a noise, as of nations, or of an army, Isaiah 13:4; Judges 4:7; Daniel 11:11-13. The word rendered “that kept holyday” - חוגג chogēg - from חגג châgag to dance - means literally dancing; dancing in a circle; and then, keeping a festival, celebrating a holyday, as this was done formerly by leaping and dancing, Exodus 5:1; Leviticus 23:41. The meaning is, that he would join with the multitude in the joyful celebrations of public worship. This was the bright anticipation before him in exile; this cheered and sustained his heart when sinking in despair.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Psalms 42:4". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/psalms-42.html. 1870.

The Biblical Illustrator

Psalms 42:4

When I remember these things, I pour out my soul in me: for I had gone with the multitude, I went with them to the house of God.

Remembrance of bygone happiness

I. The happiness of David’s former condition.

1. The store of company and society which he had with him. Good company is a very blessed and comfortable accommodation in sundry respects.

2. The place of his resort--the house of God.

As David went to the house of God in regard of the place, so he was employed in icy and praise in regard of the performances: so should we be likewise; we should not come hither to sleep, to gaze, to talk, to disturb both ourselves and others; but we should come as applying ourselves to the work and business of the time and place, with the voice of joy and praise; as the multitude of those that keep holy-day, as it is here expressed.

II. The impression which the recalling hereof had upon him. His grief was increased. There are none who more bewail the want of the ordinances and means of salvation than those who have formerly enjoyed them, and have been made partakers of them.

1. Because these know what they are. That which makes men to be indifferent in their desires to these matters is because they know not the sweetness which is in them; but now those who have formerly enjoyed them are made sensible in this particular.

2. Their desire is inured and habituated to them; use it is a second nature: now they are accustomed to such holy employments, and therefore they cannot tell how to be without them; it is grievous to them.

3. Satan, and sometimes other enemies, they do also take occasion from hence to enlarge and increase their grief to them, as here in the text, “Where is now thy God?” (Thomas Horton, D. D.)


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "Psalms 42:4". The Biblical Illustrator. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/psalms-42.html. 1905-1909. New York.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

When I remember these things,.... Either the reproaches of his enemies; or rather his past enjoyments of God in his house, he after makes mention of;

I pour out my soul in me, that is, he had no life nor spirit in him, but was quite overwhelmed with distress and anguish; or he poured out his soul in prayer to God, that it might be with him as in times past;

for I had gone with the multitude, I went with them to the house of God; the place of public worship, whither he had often gone, with great pleasure and delight; and, which added thereto, there were many that went along with him; or whom he had "caused to go"F7אדרם "deduceham", Tigurine version; "assumebum mihi iilos", Michaelis; "efficiebam eos in societatem collectos socios esse mihi", Gussetius, p. 180. , had brought along with him; which is the sense of the word, only used here and in Isaiah 38:15; as Dr. Hammond from R. Tanchum and Aben Walid, has shown: a good man will not only attend divine worship himself, but will bring others with him: but now, he could neither go alone, nor in company, the remembrance of which greatly affected his mind; see Psalm 137:1;

with the voice of joy and praise: the people singing psalms, hymns, and spiritual songs;

with a multitude that kept holy day; as especially on the three great festivals in the year, the feasts of passover, pentecost, and tabernacles, when all the males of Israel appeared before God together, and which was a large multitude; and a delightful sight it was to behold them, when they were all engaged in religious worship at once.


Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Psalms 42:4". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/psalms-42.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

When I remember d these [things], I pour out my soul in me: for I had gone with the multitude, I went with them to the house of God, with the voice of joy and praise, with a multitude that kept holyday.

(d) That is, how I led the people to serve you in your tabernacle, and now seeing my contrary estate, I die for sorrow.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Psalms 42:4". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/psalms-42.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

The verbs are properly rendered as futures, “I will remember,” etc., - that is, the recollection of this season of distress will give greater zest to the privileges of God‘s worship, when obtained.


Copyright Statement
These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Psalms 42:4". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/psalms-42.html. 1871-8.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

When I remember these things, I pour out my soul in me: for I had gone with the multitude, I went with them to the house of God, with the voice of joy and praise, with a multitude that kept holyday.

Remember — My banishment from God's presence, and mine enemies triumphs.

In me — I breathe out my sorrows and complaints to God within my own breast.

The multitudes — Israelites, who went thither in great numbers.

Holy-day — Or that kept the feast, the three solemn festival solemnities, which they kept holy unto the Lord.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Psalms 42:4". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/psalms-42.html. 1765.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

4.When I remember these things This verse is somewhat obscure, on account of the variation of the tenses in the Hebrew. And yet I have no doubt that the true and natural sense is, that David, when he called to remembrance his former condition, experienced so much the greater sadness by comparing it with his present condition. The remembrance, I say, of the past had no small influence in aggravating his misery, from the thought that he, who had formerly acted the part of a leader and standard-bearer in conducting others to the holy assemblies, should now be debarred from access to the temple. We know that those who have been accustomed to suffering from their childhood become insensible to it, and the very continuance of misery produces in us a certain degree of callousness, so that we cease to think of it, or to regard it as anything unusual. It is different with those who have not been so accustomed to it. And, therefore, it is no wonder if David, who had been not one of the common people, but who had lately occupied a chief place among the princes, and had been leader of the foremost ranks among the faithful, should be more grievously disquieted, when he saw himself utterly cast off, and not admitted to a place even among the lowest. Accordingly, I connect the demonstrative pronoun these with the declaration which follows, namely, that he remembered how he had been accustomed to mingle in the company of the godly, and to lead them to the house of God. To pour out the soul is taken metaphorically by some for to give utterance to his grief; others are of opinion, that it signifies to rejoice greatly, or, as we commonly speak, to be melted or dissolved in joy It appears to me that David rather means to say, that his affections were, as it were, melted within him, whether it were from joy or sorrow. As the soul of man sustains him, so long as it keeps its energies collected, so also it sinks within him, and, as it were, vanishes away, when any of the affections, by excessive indulgence, gains the ascendancy. (118) Accordingly, he is said to pour out his soul, who is so excited, that his affections lose their vigor, and begin to flow out. David’s language implies, that his soul melted and fainted within him by the greatness of his sorrow, when he thought of the condition from which he had fallen. If any would rather understand it of joy, the language will admit of such an illustration as this: Formerly I took such a delight in walking foremost in the ranks of the people, and leading them in procession to the sanctuary, that my heart melted within me for joy, and I was quite transported with it: if, therefore, I should again be restored to the same happy condition, all my feelings would be ravished with the same delight. I have, however, already stated what appeared to me to be the best exposition. We must not suppose that David had been overwhelmed with the sorrow of the world; but, as in his present misery he discerned the wrath of God, he sorrowed after a godly sort, because, by his own fault, he had provoked the displeasure of God against him. And, even without touching this reason of his sorrow, we see the source from which it proceeded. Even when afflicted by so many personal privations, he is nevertheless grieved only for the sanctuary, thereby showing that it would have been less distressing to him to have been deprived of life, than to continue in a state of exile from the presence of God. And, indeed, the way in which we ought to regulate all our affections is this, That, on the one hand, our joy may have respect to the paternal love and favor of God towards us, and that, on the other, the only cause of our grief may arise from feeling that he is angry with us. This is the “godly sorrow” of which Paul speaks, 2 Corinthians 7:10. By the term number, which in the Hebrew is called סך, sach, David, I have no doubt, intended ranks, or companies in procession; for when they went to the tabernacle on the holy days, they went not in confusion or in crowds, but walked in regular order, (Luke 2:44.)


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Psalms 42:4". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/psalms-42.html. 1840-57.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Psalms 42:4 When I remember these [things], I pour out my soul in me: for I had gone with the multitude, I went with them to the house of God, with the voice of joy and praise, with a multitude that kept holyday.

Ver. 4. When I remember these things] viz. My present pressures compared with my former happiness, Miserum sane est, fuisse felicem. The Epicures held (but I believe they did not believe themselves therein) that a man might be cheerful amidst the most exquisite torments, ex praeteritarum voluptatum recordatione, by the remembrance of his former pleasures and delights (Cir. de Fin. l. ii.; Sen. de Bon. l. iv. c. 22). David found this here but a slight and sorry comfort, though he better knew how than any of them to make the best of it; and his delights had been far more solid and cordial.

I pour out my soul] See Job 30:16, {See Trapp on "Job 30:16"}

For I had gone with a multitude] Heb. a thick crowd, or throng of good people, frequenting the public ordinances, and David in the head of them. One rendereth it, In umbra vel umbrella, sicut mos est Orientalium ambulare umbrellis contra ardorem solis accommodatis.

I went with them to the house of God] Lente itabam, I went with a gentle pace, gressu grallatorio. He speaketh, saith Vatablus, of the order observed by the faithful when they went to the sanctuary, viz. in comely equipage, singing praise to God, and confessing his goodness.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Psalms 42:4". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/psalms-42.html. 1865-1868.

Sermon Bible Commentary

Psalms 42:4

I. The literal reference is to the place at which the Jews were accustomed statedly to worship God, which had been selected by Divine appointment, and by whose institutions were mainly preserved the objects of the Jewish economy.

II. Notice the advantages of the sanctuary. It is the scene (1) of instruction; (2) of consolation; (3) of fellowship with God; (4) of preparation for heaven.

W. M. Punshon, Sermons, p. 101.



Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Nicoll, William R. "Commentary on Psalms 42:4". "Sermon Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/sbc/psalms-42.html.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Psalms 42:4. When I remember these things, &c.— When I call to mind these things, my soul is melted within me; when I marched along under a scarlet canopy to the house of God, with the voice of shout and praise; a tumultuous crowd of people keeping holy-day. The Psalmist says, that his soul was melted within him when he called to mind past times, when on solemn days he paid his devotions at the sanctuary. Mudge.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Psalms 42:4". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/psalms-42.html. 1801-1803.

Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary

Those are the sweetest remembrances, however mingled with tears, which callback past enjoyments of grace and divine fellowship. What can be more refreshing, in a dark hour, when all comfort seems for a season to be withdrawn, than the recollection that in such a place, at such a time, and upon such an occasion, the Lord did manifest himself to my soul? Jacob's Bethel, and Moses' bush, opened sources of relief upon numberless occasions of this sort. Genesis 32:12; Exodus 3:2; Deuteronomy 33:16.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Hawker, Robert, D.D. "Commentary on Psalms 42:4". "Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/pmc/psalms-42.html. 1828.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

These things; either,

1. Which follow, to wit, my former freedom. Or rather,

2. Last mentioned, my banishment from God’s presence, and mine enemies’ scoffs and triumphs upon that occasion.

I pour out my soul: this phrase notes either,

1. His fervent prayer, as it is taken, 1 Samuel 1:15 Psalms 62:8. Or,

2. His bitter sorrows, whereby his very heart was almost melted or dissolved, and his spirits spent, and he was ready to faint away; as it is used Job 30:16 Lamentations 2:12. Compare Psalms 22:14. Or rather,

3. Both together; that he breathed out his sorrows and sad complaints unto God by fervent prayers. In me, i.e. within my own breast, between God and my own soul; not openly, lest mine enemies should turn it into matter of rejoicing and insulting over me.

I had gone, to wit, in the way to Jerusalem. And my sorrow was increased by the remembrance of my former enjoyments. Compare Lamentations 1:7.

With the multitude; according to the custom, and in the company of Israelites, who went thither in great numbers. Compare Psalms 84:6,7.

I went with them; or, I led them, encouraging them by my presence and forwardness.

That kept holyday; or, that kept the feast, to wit, the three solemn festival solemnities, which they kept holy unto the Lord.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Psalms 42:4". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/psalms-42.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

4. When I remember these things—It is more easy and simple to take “these things” as referring, not to what follows, as some do, but to the psalmist’s sorrow and to the cruel taunts of his enemies; and he appeals to his habit of worship in vindication of his sincerity.

With the voice of joy and praise—The description here applies to their great festivals and most public occasions of worship, in which he led the procession with singing and joy,

[image]

freely placing himself among the masses, as on the removal of the ark, 2 Samuel 6:14.

Kept holyday— חגג, (hhagag,) translated “kept holyday,” primarily means, to move, or dance in a circle, and thence to move in a procession, to celebrate a feast. In this last sense it is always rendered in the English version, except in 1 Samuel 30:16, where it is translated dancing. In the earlier Hebrew history dancing, which was often little else than a graceful keeping of step with the music, was, though not of Mosaic origin, an early accompaniment of their festivals, (Judges 21:19-23,) and always of public celebrations of victory. Exodus 15:20; 2 Samuel 6:14; see also on Psalms 68:11; Psalms 68:25. From a too literal construction of David’s words it has been supposed by some that he introduced dancing at the great festivals: but of this there is no evidence, though it reappeared in later Maccabean times. It was universal as a religious ceremony in heathen festivals, but never obtained any permanency among the Hebrews. In Psalms 30:11; Psalms 149:3; Psalms 150:4, a different word is used, where see notes. In the text it means no more than “the multitude, celebrating the feast,” not a “festive crowd dancing in a circle.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Psalms 42:4". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/psalms-42.html. 1874-1909.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Youth. St. Jerome, "the God of my joy and exultation." (Haydock) --- Syriac and Arabic agree with us, and Gil means, (Calmet) a young man, in Arabic and Hebrew. (Hammond) --- People in youth, shew for the effects of joy. (Berthier) --- Accompanied with light, and a pure intention, we may offer sacrifice to God, who changeth our corruptions into newness of life. (Worthington) --- The Levites might sing near the altar, but could not offer victims. (Calmet)


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Psalms 42:4". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/psalms-42.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

had gone = shall go.

went = shall go.

holy day = feast day.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Psalms 42:4". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/psalms-42.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

When I remember these things, I pour out my soul in me: for I had gone with the multitude, I went with them to the house of God, with the voice of joy and praise, with a multitude that kept holyday.

When I remember these (things), I pour out my soul in me: for I had gone with the multitude - rather, 'I will purposely remember these things, and will pour out my soul in (literally, upon, or with) me.' For there is no proper contrast between remembering the scornful question of the enemy (as "these things" mean in the English version) and the going with the multitude to the house of God. "These things" mean his former happiness in being privileged to take part in the worship of the sanctuary (Psalms 55:14), in contrast to his present exclusion from it. 'I will remember thee' (Psalms 42:6) thus explains 'I will remember these things' here. The futures (and these with the paragogic he (h), which expresses a deliberate effort, or striving) imply repeated and intentional recalling to the mind, and pouring out of the soul. He purposely aggravates his pain. In deep sorrow one's tendency is to call up the remembrance of better times now gone, and so to increase one's pain by brooding over the contrast (cf. Psalms 77:3). With the phrase, "I pour out my soul in (Hebrew, upon) me," cf. Job 30:16; Psalms 22:14. It implies, I will give loose rein to all my sorrow. The use of the UPON [ `al (Hebrew #5921)] expresses that the soul is the ruling principle in man (Koester in Hengstenberg). (Jeremiah 8:18, margin.)

I went with them to the house of God - properly, 'I advanced with the solemn step of religious processionists.' The Hebrew verb, 'edadeem (Hebrew #1718), is found elsewhere only in Hezekiah's prayer (Isaiah 38:15), "I shall go softly all my years." For "with them," translate, 'advanced before them' as their leader; I moved, with measured step, heading them in procession to the house of God. Compare 2 Samuel 6:5-6; 2 Samuel 6:14-15.

With the voice of joy and praise - with such processional psalms as were customary in going up to the sanctuary: called 'songs of degrees,' or 'pilgrim songs,' (Psalms 120:1-7; Psalms 121:1-8; Psalms 122:1-9; Psalms 123:1-4; Psalms 124:1-8; Psalms 125:1-5; Psalms 126:1-6; Psalms 127:1-5; Psalms 128:1-6; Psalms 129:1-8; Psalms 130:1-8; Psalms 131:1-3; Psalms 132:1-18; Psalms 133:1-3; Psalms 134:1-3.)


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Psalms 42:4". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/psalms-42.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(4) When I.—The conjunction “when” is not expressed, but may be implied from the next clause. Others render, “let me recall these days (i.e., what follows), let me pour out my soul within me” (literally, upon me. Comp. Psalms 142:3). But the Authorised Version is better, “when I think of it, my heart must overflow.” The expression, “I pour out my soul upon me,” may, however, mean, “I weep floods of tears over myself,” i.e., “over my lot.”

For I had gone with the multitude.—The LXX. and Vulg., as well as the strangeness of the words rendered “multitude” and “went with them,” indicate a corruption of the text. Fortunately the general sense and reference of the verse are independent of the doubtful expressions. The poet indulges in a grateful recollection of some great festival, probably the Feast of Tabernacles. (See LXX.)

That kept holyday.—Literally, dancing or reeling. But the word is used absolutely (Exodus 5:1; Leviticus 23:41) for keeping a festival, and especially the Feast of Tabernacles. Dancing appears to have been a recognised part of the ceremonial. (Comp. 2 Samuel 6:16.)


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Psalms 42:4". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/psalms-42.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

When I remember these things, I pour out my soul in me: for I had gone with the multitude, I went with them to the house of God, with the voice of joy and praise, with a multitude that kept holyday.
When
Ruth 1:21; Job 29:2-25; 30:1-31; Lamentations 4:1; Luke 16:25
I pour
62:8; 1 Samuel 1:15,16; Job 30:16
for I
1 Chronicles 15:15-28; 16:1-43
with the voice
81:1-3; 122:1; Deuteronomy 16:11,14,15; 2 Chronicles 7:10; 30:23-26; Isaiah 30:29; Nahum 1:15

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Psalms 42:4". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/psalms-42.html.

Ver. 4. Thereon will I think, and pour out my soul in me, that I drew with the multitude, proceeded before them to the house of God with the voice of joy and praise, among the multitude keeping holiday. Some, and last Stier, refer the אלה to the preceding, the scorn of the enemies, and take the fut. אעבר and אדדם in the meaning of the fut. Luther: When I think on this, I pour out my heart in myself, for I would indeed go; Stier: I consume myself, pour out my soul in longing after this, that I (once more again) might go away. But in thus referring the this to the "mournful question, which David cannot answer, but of which he must constantly think," we get entangled in the difficulty, that the question of the enemies: where is now thy God, or the position of the Psalmist, which gives occasion to this question, and the going with the multitude and proceeding to the house of God, form no proper and fitting contrast. It were somewhat different, if the discourse here were only generally of the coming to the sanctuary, to its again opened way of approach. To this belongs the comp. of Psalms 42:6, where the object of the thinking is, not the scorn of enemies, but God and his earlier salvation, and the comp. of the quite parall. Psalms 55:14. We would, therefore, with the overwhelming majority of expositors refer the this to what follows, and must take the fut. as indicative of the frequently repeated action in the past, precisely as they occur in Psalms 55:14. The pain of the Psalmist is increased, when he brings into view his earlier blessedness, and places it beside his present misery. There is no propriety in taking, with many expositors, the two fut. with the ה of striving, at the commencement, in the meaning of the common future: thereon think I and pour out; nor with Ewald, of substituting for, I will, I shall, or must think and pour out. The common import of this fut., according to which it denotes "the striving of the mind, the direction of the will upon a determinate aim," is quite suitable here. The Psalmist will purposely aggravate his pain. He will recall his earlier prosperity to mind, in order thereby the more sensibly to feel his present misery, his separation from the sanctuary. It is peculiar to deep sorrow, that it seeks out what tends to feed it, in particular, purposely loses itself in the mournful remembrance of the happier past. That the common import of the fut. parag. is to be retained, is decisively proved also by the comp. of Psalms 77:3, which place further shows, that the object of the thinking is not the scorn of the enemies, but the vanished prosperity, as is also confirmed by Psalms 42:6 and Psalms 42:11. The heart pours itself forth, or melts in any one, who is in a manner dissolved by grief and pain,—comp. Job 30:16, "and now my soul is poured out upon me," Psalms 22:14, "My heart has become like water, melts in my inwards," and the passages there referred to. Some improperly supply: in sighing and tears. עלי unquestionably signifies in a large number of places with me, and Gesenius, in his Thes. p. 1027 , justly notices other places, which, though if considered by themselves, another exposition might be possible, yet are so similar to these, that they cannot be dissevered from them. However, it is carefully to be remarked, that על occurs in the sense of with only in a certain connection, "in speeches which refer to the heart, the soul, the mind, with their concerns and changes." This fact shows, that we must not drop from our view the radical meaning of the preposition. The עלי in such passages signifies with me, alluding to this, that the soul is the honour, the better part. Quite correctly Koester: "everywhere (besides here Psalms 42:5-6, Psalms 42:11; Psalms 43:5,) our poet uses על of the soul, whereby the soul is indicated as the ruling principle in man.— סךְ multitude, here of the companies of worshippers, of their solemn processions to the temple. אדדם is Hithp. of דדה, to go slowly along, which elsewhere occurs only in Isaiah 38:15, in the song of Hezekiah: "I will go slowly all my days in the bitterness of my soul," as one, who was at once freed from death, and appointed to death. Here it refers to the measured, solemn step of the procession. The suffix appended to it, referring to the collect. סךְ, requires a modification of the verbal idea, since the supposition, that the suffix accus. stands here for the dative, is untenable. The Hithp. standing properly as reflexive without an object, often receives such an one, if the language in reflexive gradually insinuates a possibly active application of the idea, Ew. § 243. So here the idea of the moving one's self slowly, goes over into that of the leading slowly, which the verb, however, contains only by its construction with the accus. The expression: I moved to and fro to them, could not be used.

The mention of joy and praise shows, that it was customary to go to the sanctuary with songs of praise to the Lord, such as are found in the "Pilgrim-songs," Psalms 120-134. The use of music in the processions is clear from 2 Samuel 6:5-6. The ב is placed at every secondary matter, which accompanies the action, comp. Ew. § 521. Before the last words it is better to supply the ב from the immediately preceding, with a multitude keeping holiday, or to suppose, that they stand formally as quite independent, "a holiday-keeping multitude," then to consider them as appos. to the suff. in אדדם, which would make a trailing period. המון prop. tumult, is used also of the festival-holding multitude in 2 Samuel 6:19. The verse gives us a deep insight into the nature of the true service of God under the Old Testament, shows how the minds of the assembly were seized by a mighty impulse, and the fire of devotion and adoration was fanned into a bright flame.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Hengstenberg, Ernst. "Commentary on Psalms 42:4". Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/heg/psalms-42.html.

To report dead links, typos, or html errors or suggestions about making these resources more useful use our convenient contact form
Powered by Lightspeed Technology