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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Psalms 46:1

 

 

God is our refuge and strength, A very present help in trouble.

Adam Clarke Commentary

God is our refuge - It begins abruptly, but nobly; ye may trust in whom and in what ye please: but God (Elohim) is our refuge and strength.

A very present help - A help found to be very powerful and effectual in straits and difficulties. The words are very emphatic: מאד נמצא בצרות עזרה ezerah betsaroth nimtsa meod, "He is found an exceeding, or superlative help in difficulties." Such we have found him, and therefore celebrate his praise.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Psalms 46:1". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/psalms-46.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

God is our refuge and strength - God is for us as a place to which we may flee for safety; a source of strength to us in danger. The first word, “refuge,” from a verb meaning to “flee,” and then “to flee to” - הסה châsâh - or to take shelter in - denotes a place to which one would flee in time of danger - as a lofty wall; a high tower; a fort; a fortress. See the notes at Psalm 18:2. The idea here is, that the people of God, in time of danger, may find him to be what such a place of refuge would be. Compare Proverbs 18:10. The word “strength” implies that God is the source of strength to those who are weak and defenseless; or that we may rely on his strength “as if” it were our own; or that we may feel as safe in his strength as though we had that strength ourselves. We may make it the basis of our confidence as really as though the strength resided in our own arm. See the notes at Psalm 18:2.

A very present help - The word “help” here means aid, assistance. The word “trouble” would cover all that can come upon us which would give us anxiety or sorrow. The word rendered “present” - נמצא nimetsâ' - means rather, “is found,” or “has been found;” that is, he has “proved” himself to be a help in trouble. The word “present,” as if he were near to us, or close by us, does not accurately express the idea, which is rather, that “he has been found” to be such, or that he has always “proved” himself to be such a help, and that, therefore, we may now confide in him. The word “very,” or “exceedingly,” is added to qualify the whole proposition, as if this were “emphatically true.” It was true in the most eminent sense that God had always been found to be such a helper, and, “therefore,” there was nothing to fear in the present distress. Psalm 46:2.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Psalms 46:1". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/psalms-46.html. 1870.

Coffman's Commentaries on the Bible

PSALM 46

GOD THE REFUGE OF HIS PEOPLE

The title here is that which is assigned in the American Standard Version superscription, where it is also stated that the Psalm is for the Chief Musician, a Psalm of the Sons of Korah, a Song set to Alamoth, that latter word probably referring to the particular tune to be used for this psalm.

For once, we find scholars of widely divergent views in full agreement as to the occasion when this psalm was probably composed. The radical critic Addis, the conservative Leupold, and the current Dummelow all agree that the occasion was shortly after the destruction of Sennacherib's army before the walls of Jerusalem in 701 B.C. Here is what these scholars wrote:

"Psalms 46-48 form a group of three which we may assign with little doubt to the reign of Hezekiah, when Sennacherib's army was suddenly destroyed (2 Kings 19:35). They all three strike the same note of gratitude, confidence and praise, which is found in Isaiah's references to the same event (Isaiah 29-31; Isaiah 33; Isaiah 37).[1]

"This Psalm looks back to the deliverance from Sennacherib. Compare Psalms 46:5, "God shall help her at the dawning of the morning," with Isaiah 37:36, "Early in the morning they (i.e., Sennacherib's army) were all dead men"![2]

"Leupold reviewed a number of other suggestions regarding the great deliverance of Israel which is celebrated in this psalm, and then stated that: `Nothing meets the needs of the case quite so well as does the great deliverance that took place in the days of Hezekiah (701 B.C.) when Sennacherib's forces were disastrously destroyed after having directly threatened the city of Jerusalem, and when the omnipotence of the God of Israel was underscored as it was on but few other occasions.'"[3]SIZE>

This psalm is famous for the very first line of it, which was made the theme of Martin Luther's great hymn, "A Mighty Fortress is our God." People of all religious convictions still sing this mighty hymn all over the world. Halley called it the "Song of the Reformation."[4] And Spurgeon tells this story:

"There were times when Martin Luther was threatened with discouragement; but he would say, "Come, Philip, let us sing the 46th Psalm"; and they would sing it in Luther's own version, translated by Thomas Carlyle:

`A sure stronghold our God is He,

A timely shield and weapon;

Our help He'll be, and set us free

From every can happen.

And were the world with devils filled,

All eager to devour us,

Our souls to fear shall little yield,

They cannot overpower us.'"[5]SIZE>

P. H. Hodge translated the Luther Hymn for Great Songs of the Church, as follows:

"A mighty fortress is our God, A bulwark never failing;

Our helper he amid the flood Of mortal ills prevailing.

And though this world with demons filled, Should threaten to undo us

We will not fear, for God has willed His truth to triumph through us.'"[6]SIZE>

"This psalm is both historical and prophetic. It refers to things that happened in Israel; and it is a prophecy concerning the New Testament Church."[7]

Kidner gave the organization of this psalm as follows: (1) The Most High's ascendancy over nature (Psalms 46:1-3); (2) His ascendancy over the attackers of His city (Psalms 46:4-7); and (3) His ascendancy over the whole warring world (Psalms 46:8-11).[8]

GOD'S ASCENDANCY OVER NATURE

Psalms 46:1-3

"God is our refuge and strength.

A very present help in trouble.

Therefore will we not fear,

Though the earth do change,

And though the mountains be shaken into the heart of the seas;

Though the waters thereof roar and be troubled,

Though the mountains tremble with the swelling thereof.

(Selah)"

Psalms 46:2-3 here are considered to be figurative, standing for all kinds of political commotion and turbulent conflict among nations. Rawlinson identified these terrible political upheavals as, "Probably those caused by the Assyrian career of conquest."[9]

However, the language here is very similar to that which is used prophetically of the Day of Judgment and the end of human probation, in a number of Biblical references. Those cosmic disturbances include earthquakes, the removal of islands and mountains out of their places, the failing of the sun's light, etc. From this, some have interpreted this heavenly refuge in God as a safe haven, even at that time. "When the elements shall melt with fervent heat, and the heavens and the earth shall pass away in that final great conflagration,"[10] at which time God will, "Wipe this Adam off the face of the earth" (Zephaniah 1:2-3).

To be sure, this is a valid understanding of these verses. Even in the cataclysmic scenes that shall mark the end of God's Dispensation of Grace, "God is the refuge and the strength of those who love him."

The primary meaning of these verses (Psalms 46:2-3) "Is figurative, standing for stress and trouble."[11]


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James Burton Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.

Bibliography
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Psalms 46:1". "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/psalms-46.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

God is our refuge and strength,.... That is, Christ, who is God as well as man, is the "refuge" for souls to fly unto for safety; as for sensible sinners, in a view of danger, wrath, and misery, so for saints, in every time of distress; typified by the cities of refuge, under the legal dispensation; See Gill on Psalm 9:9; and he it is from whom they have all their spiritual strength, and every renewal and supply of it, to exercise grace, perform duties, withstand enemies, bear the cross patiently, show a fortitude of mind under the sorest distresses, and hold on and out unto the end: in short, he is the strength of their hearts, under the greatest trials, of their lives, amidst the greatest dangers; and of their salvation, notwithstanding all their enemies;

a very present help in trouble; whether inward or outward, of soul or body; the Lord helps his people under it to bear it, and he helps them out of it in the most proper and seasonable time: they are poor helpless creatures in themselves; nor can any other help them but the Lord, who made heaven and earth; and he helps presently, speedily, and effectually: in the Hebrew text it is, "he is found an exceeding help in trouble"F20נמצא מאד "inventum valde", Michaelis. ; in all kind of trouble that the saints come into, the Lord has been found, by experience, to be an exceeding great helper of them; moreover, he is easily and always to be come at, and found by them for their help.


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Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Psalms 46:1". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/psalms-46.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

"To the chief Musician for the sons of Korah, A Song upon a Alamoth." God [is] our refuge and strength, a very present help in b trouble.

(a) Which was either a musical instrument or a solemn tune, to which this psalm was sung.

(b) In all manner of troubles God shows his speedy mercy and power in defending his.


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Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Psalms 46:1". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/psalms-46.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Psalm 46:1-11. Upon Alamoth - most probably denotes the treble, or part sung by female voices, the word meaning “virgins”; and which was sung with some appropriately keyed instrument (compare 1 Chronicles 15:19-21; see on Psalm 6:1, title). The theme may be stated in Luther‘s well-known words, “A mighty fortress is our God.” The great deliverance (2 Kings 19:35; Isaiah 37:36) may have occasioned its composition.

refuge — literally, “a place of trust” (Psalm 2:12).

strength — (Psalm 18:2).

present help — literally, “a help He has been found exceedingly.”

trouble — as in Psalm 18:7.


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Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Psalms 46:1". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/psalms-46.html. 1871-8.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

1.God is our refuge and strength Here the Psalmist begins with a general expression or sentiment, before he comes to speak of the more particular deliverance. He begins by premising that God is sufficiently able to protect his own people, and that he gives them sufficient ground to expect it; for this the word מחסה, machaseh, properly signifies. In the second clause of the verse the verb he is found, which we translate in the present, is in the past tense, he has been found; and, indeed, there would be no impropriety in limiting the language to some particular deliverance which had already been experienced, just as others also have rendered it in the past tense. But as the prophet adds the term tribulations in the plural number, I prefer explaining it of a continued act, That God comes seasonably to our aid, and is never wanting in the time of need, as often as any afflictions press upon his people. If the prophet were speaking of the experience of God’s favor, it would answer much better to render the verb in the past tense. It is, however, obvious that his design is to extol the power of God and his goodness towards his people, and to show how ready God is to afford them assistance, that they may not in the time of their adversities gaze around them on every side, but rest satisfied with his protection alone. He therefore says expressly that God acts in such a manner towards them, to let the Church know that he exercises a special care in preserving and defending her. There can be no doubt that by this expression he means to draw a distinction between the chosen people of God and other heathen nations, and in this way to commend the privilege of adoption which God of his goodness had vouchsafed to the posterity of Abraham. Accordingly, when I said before that it was a general expression, my intention was not to extend it to all manner of persons, but only to all times; for the object of the prophet is to teach us after what manner God is wont to act towards those who are his people. He next concludes, by way of inference, that the faithful nave no reason to be afraid, since God is always ready to deliver them, nay, is also armed with invincible power. He shows in this that the true and proper proof of our hope consists in this, that, when things are so confused, that the heavens seem as it were to fall with great violence, the earth to remove out of its place, and the mountains to be torn up from their very foundations, we nevertheless continue to preserve and maintain calmness and tranquillity of heart. It is an easy matter to manifest the appearance of great confidence, so long as we are not placed in imminent danger: but if, in the midst of a general crash of the whole world, our minds continue undisturbed and free of trouble, this is an evident proof that we attribute to the power of God the honor which belongs to him. When, however, the sacred poet says, We will not fear, he is not to be understood as meaning that the minds of the godly are exempt from all solicitude or fear, as if they were destitute of feeling, for there is a great difference between insensibility and the confidence of faith. He only shows that whatever may happen they are never overwhelmed with terror, but rather gather strength and courage sufficient to allay all fear. Though the earth be moved, and the mountains fall into the midst of the sea, are hyperbolical modes of expression, but they nevertheless denote a revolution, and turning upside down of the whole world. Some have explained the expression, the midst of the sea, as referring to the earth. I do not, however, approve of it. But in order more fully to understand the doctrine of the psalm, let us proceed to consider what follows.


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Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Psalms 46:1". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/psalms-46.html. 1840-57.

Scofield's Reference Notes

Alamoth

Alamoth, "soprano," from almah, a virgin. Some have thought the alamoth, "virgins," were a temple choir, singing antiphonally to the sheminith, or male choir. (See Scofield "Psalms 6:1"). But contr, see 1 Chronicles 15:20.


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Bibliography
Scofield, C. I. "Scofield Reference Notes on Psalms 46:1". "Scofield Reference Notes (1917 Edition)". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/srn/psalms-46.html. 1917.

James Nisbet's Church Pulpit Commentary

GOD A STRONG REFUGE

‘God is our refuge and strength.’

Psalms 46:1

The Psalmist who wrote these words knew the happiness of their meaning, for the life into which God does not enter cannot be, in the deepest sense, happy.

I. Our refuge.

(a) From isolation and human misunderstanding.—Probably the experience of some here is in union with those who are surrounded by lack of sympathy and lack of appreciation. It is a blessed thing to know Jesus Christ, the Friend who sticketh closer than a brother. God is our refuge from isolation and from human misunderstanding.

(b) From provocation.—Again, it is a hard, but it is a Divine, lesson to be calm and restrained under wrongful blame, a difficult, but a splendid victory. God is our refuge from provocation.

(c) From change.—Again, everything around us changes. The world itself is but for a time. We ourselves grow old and change, but Jesus Christ is the same yesterday and to-day, yea, and for ever, and he that doeth the Will of God abideth for ever. God is our refuge from change.

(d) From sin.—Then there is that terrible thing called sin, the remembrance of good left undone and of evil done. Christ died, that, believing on Him, sin might be put away. The forgiveness of sins is offered to us in Jesus Christ our Saviour. God is our refuge from sin.

(e) From sorrow.—And when sickness comes, when the wife or the child is taken, when work is slack and expenses go on, and the income is but small, if we can but look up to the face of Our Father, without Whom not a sparrow falls to the ground, and say, ‘Thou, O God, art my Refuge in the day of trouble,’ God is then our refuge from sorrow.

(f) From uncertainty.—And God is our refuge from uncertainty. The agnostic and the materialist may excel in what is called destructive criticism, in declaring what is not; but when pressed to say what is, they are generally silent. By looking in the wrong way, the wise have never found, and, what is more, they never will find out God, because He reveals Himself to the childlike in heart, and His revelation addresses itself to the whole of our nature and not to one part, to the warm, loving heart, as well as to the cold, scoffing intellect. To the Greeks and Romans, as to the modern sceptic, everything was uncertain; but to the humblest believer light is sprung up in the darkness, for God is our refuge from doubt and from uncertainty.

II. Our strength.—To those that thus receive the Lord, the Refuge becomes also an Almighty Strength in Whose Holy Spirit the very weakest of us can live a life to His glory and to the good of others, and may realise true religion.

—Rev. Dr. Darlington.

Illustrations

(1) ‘God is Refuge to me in my danger and peril. Whether it be the ill-desert of my sin that alarms me, or the pollution of my sin that fills me with shame, or the strength of my sin that dismays me, or the attractions and fascinations of my sin that lure me, a safe stronghold my God is still. When I flee to Him, when my home is in Him, sin cannot have dominion over me.

God is River to me in my barrenness and sterility. The streams of His manifold grace make glad the city of my soul. It is His pardon, until seventy times seven. It is His holiness, meeting and conquering all my evil. It is His peace, which passeth understanding. It is His power, equipping me for every service and every trial. It is His joy, unspeakable and full of glory. “The Lord is with me in majesty, a Place of broad rivers and streams!”’

(2) ‘On this psalm Luther has founded his notable hymn, Ein’ feste Burg ist unser Gott, “A fortress strong is God our Lord.” It bears in every word the impress of his faith and Christian heroism, and has a long history of its own in the life of the German people and in other languages into which it has been rendered. It was written in 1529.’


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Bibliography
Nisbet, James. "Commentary on Psalms 46:1". Church Pulpit Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cpc/psalms-46.html. 1876.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Psalms 46:1 « To the chief Musician for the sons of Korah, A Song upon Alamoth. » God [is] our refuge and strength, a very present help in trouble.

Upon Alamoth] i.e. Upon the Virginals. Virgins with their shrill treble tune, 1 Chronicles 15:20, used (belike) to sing this triumphant psalm, and to play it on the instrument; and their hearts were somewhat suitable to it. The penman some think to have been David, upon occasion of those notable victories, 2 Samuel 8:1-14; others, Solomon, for the virgins to sing and play at his wedding, Psalms 45:8-9, Song of Solomon 1:2; others, Isaiah, either upon the overthrow of those two kings, Rezin and Pekah, 2 Kings 16:5, Isaiah 7:8, confer 5:11, or else after the slaughter of Sennacherib’s army by an angel; then the virgin daughter of Zion (much more than before) despised him, and laughed him to scorn; the daughter of Jerusalem shook her head at him, Isaiah 37:22, and sang as followeth:

Ver. 1. God is our refuge and strength] Deus nobis est receptus, et robur (Tremel.). All creatures, when in distress, run to their refuges, Proverbs 30:26, Psalms 104:18, Proverbs 18:11, Daniel 4:10-11, 9:50-51. So do the saints to God Almighty, for the safe-guarding of their persons, as here, and Isaiah 25:4. Luther, when in greatest distress, was wont to call for this psalm, saying, Let us sing the forty-sixth psalm in concert; and then let the devil do his worst.

A very present help in trouble] Or, we have abundantly found him a help in tribulation (Joh. Manlii loc. com.). God, as he is not far off his people at such a time, so he needeth not much entreaty; but when we are nearest danger he is nearest to deliver, as in the gunpowder plot prevented eight or nine hours before it should have been acted; masses were sung in Rome for the prospering of it; but no prayers particularly made in England for the preventing, nor could be. Here God was, if ever, auxilium praesentissimum.


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Psalms 46:1". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/psalms-46.html. 1865-1868.

Sermon Bible Commentary

Psalms 46:1

I. This Psalm is a hymn concerning the kingdom of Christ and of God. It tells us something of the government which Christ has been exercising over the world ever since the beginning of it, and which He is exercising over this world now. "Be still, and know that I am God"—that I, not you, will be exalted among the nations; that I, not you, will be exalted in the earth.

II. Those who forget that they are in Christ's kingdom Christ does not go out of His way to punish. They simply punish themselves. They earn their own ruin by the very laws of nature.

III. If you wish to prosper on the earth, let God be in all your thoughts. Remember that the Lord is on your right hand; and then, and then alone, will you not be moved, either to terror or to sin, by any of the chances and changes of this mortal life. "He that believeth," saith the prophet, "shall not make haste"—shall not hurry himself into folly, and disappointment, and shame.

C. Kingsley, All Saints' Day, and Other Sermons, p. 200.


References: Psalms 46:1.—Spurgeon, Evening by Evening, p. 124. Psalms 46:1, Psalms 46:2.—C. Kingsley, The Water of Life, p. 228; H. Jones, Christian World Pulpit, vol. xxv., p. 314. Psalms 46:4.—D. Jones, Ibid., vol. xviii., p. 276.


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Bibliography
Nicoll, William R. "Commentary on Psalms 46:1". "Sermon Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/sbc/psalms-46.html.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Psalms 46.

The confidence which the church hath in God. An exhortation to behold it.

To the chief musician, for the sons of Korah: A Song upon Alamoth.

Title. שׁיר עלמות על קרח לבני למנצח lamnatseach libnei korach al alamoth shiir.] This Psalm is thought to have been composed by David upon his conquest over the Philistines and Moabites, 2 Samuel 8:1-2. The style is lofty, and seems every way worthy of that Royal Author. With great force of expression he compares the powerful fury and terror of his enemies to that of an earthquake, or to the threatening horrors of a tempestuous sea.

The word עלמות Alamoth is translated by some the virgins, and by others things secret: and, accordingly, it is on one hand supposed either to refer to some tune then in common use, or some musical instrument unknown to us, which was peculiarly adapted to the virgins who sung in the choir; 1 Chronicles 15:20.; and, on the other hand, it is thought to refer to the secret and hidden mysteries of the Gospel. See Fenwick on the title of the 9th Psalm. The Chaldee title runs thus: "A hymn of praise for the sons of Korah, in the spirit of prophesy, when their father was hidden from them; nevertheless, they were delivered, and sung this hymn." The Syriac adds, "Taken in its prophetical sense, it alludes to the preaching of the apostles."


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Bibliography
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Psalms 46:1". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/psalms-46.html. 1801-1803.

Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary

CONTENTS

This is a song or Psalm of holy triumph. The prophet exhorts the Church to make God in Christ her confidence. A reference is made, towards the close of the Psalm, from beholding the desolations of the earth, to consider the blessed of those who have the Lord for their God.

To the chief Musician for the sons of Korah. A song upon Alamoth.


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Bibliography
Hawker, Robert, D.D. "Commentary on Psalms 46:1". "Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/pmc/psalms-46.html. 1828.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

PSALM 46

THE ARGUMENT

The occasion of this Psalm is thought to be that happy success, and settlement, and peace which God granted to the people of Israel in David’s time, and by his means, 2Sa 8

The confidence and safe condition of the church under God’s care, Psalms 46:1-5; manifested in his wonderful deliverance from her enemies, Psalms 46:6-9. He exhorteth all to consider it, to the magnifying his name, Psalms 46:10,11.

God is our refuge, i.e. he hath now manifested himself to be so by the course of his providence.

A very present; or, a sufficient, as this word is sometimes used, as Joshua 17:16 Zechariah 10:10.


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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Psalms 46:1". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/psalms-46.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

1. Refuge and strength—Two strong words to express complete safety.

Very present help—Literally, God has been found a help in distress exceedingly. The idea is of greatness and sufficiency of help.


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Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Psalms 46:1". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/psalms-46.html. 1874-1909.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

Psalms 46:1. God is our refuge and strength — He hath manifested himself to be so in the course of his providence in time past, and he has engaged to be so in time to come, and will not fail to fulfil his engagement. Are we in danger from visible or invisible enemies? God is our refuge, to whom we may flee, and in whom we may be safe. Have we work to do, a warfare to accomplish, and sufferings to endure? God is our strength to bear us up under our burdens, and to fit us for all our services and sufferings. Are we oppressed with troubles and distresses? He is a help in trouble: yea, a present help — Hebrew, עזרה נמצא מאד, gnezra nimtza meod, a help found exceedingly, or, tried very much; one whom we have found by experience to be such; a help on which we may write, probatum est; or, a help at hand, that is, never far to seek, but always ready to be found of us. Or, a help sufficient, accommodated to every case and exigence whatever.


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Bibliography
Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on Psalms 46:1". Joseph Benson's Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/psalms-46.html. 1857.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

Title. A Song. Hebrew. shir. One of the "Songs" referred to in Isaiah 38:20 (though not the same word). See App-65. Doubtless Hezekiah"s during Sennacherib"s siege. No other period of Israel"s history suits it. Not celebrating a victorious campaign, but a successful defense. See notes below. Psalms 46:47, Psalms 46:48 a Trilogy referring to the same event. See note on "Selah", Psalms 46:11.

our refuge. Figure of speech Cycloides (App-6), because repeated in Psalms 46:7 and Psalms 46:11. See Structure above.

refuge: to which one flees. Hebrew. hasah. App-69. Not the same word as verses: Psalms 46:7, Psalms 46:11.

very present = found (near); masculine refers to God (help is feminine)


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Psalms 46:1". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/psalms-46.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

God is our refuge and strength, a very present help in trouble.

Psalms 46:1-11.-The Church's security, because God is in her, amidst the world's convulsions: as shown in the sudden overthrow of Sennacherib's invading hosts (cf. Psalms 46:8-10), which hitherto had swept on irresistibly. Two coincidences with history occur: in Psalms 46:4, "the city of God," just as Isaiah 36:1 informs us that all "the defensed cities of Judah" except Jerusalem, the mother city, had fallen before Sennacherib; also in Psalms 46:10, "Know that I am God ... I will be exalted in the earth," is God's reply to Hezekiah's prayer, "O Lord our God, save us ... that all the kingdoms of the earth may know that thou art the Lord."

Title. - A song upon Alamoth , [ `


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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Psalms 46:1". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/psalms-46.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(1) Refuge and strength.—Better, a refuge and stronghold, or a sure stronghold, as in Luther’s hymn,

Ein feste Burg ist unser Gott.

A very present help.—Better, often found a help.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Psalms 46:1". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/psalms-46.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

God is our refuge and strength, a very present help in trouble.
A. M. 3108. B.C. 896. (Title.) for. or, of. the sons
84:1; 85:1; 87:1; *titles
A song
48:1; 66:1; *titles
Alamoth
1 Chronicles 15:20
refuge
7,11; 62:7,8; 91:1-9; 142:5; Proverbs 14:26; 18:10; Luke 13:34; Hebrews 6:18
a very
145:18; Genesis 22:14; Deuteronomy 4:7; 2 Samuel 22:17-20

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Psalms 46:1". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/psalms-46.html.

Commentary by J.C.Philpot on select texts of the Bible

Psalm 46:1

"God is our refuge and strength, a very present help in trouble." Psalm 46:1

The Christian who has known what it is to worship God in spirit and in truth has a God to help him in his direst extremities; for as long as the spirit of prayer abides in his bosom—and that spirit once given is never taken away—he can at times and seasons pour out his heart before God, and find help and strength in him. This, then, is one of his blessed resources, that he has a God to go to, the Lord Almighty, into whose ears his cries may enter. But besides this, all the promises are on his side, which are yes and amen in Christ Jesus. Nor is he without sword or shield, or the whole armor of God. Nor is he without faith and hope, or secret supplies of strength made perfect in weakness. Nor is he without a knowledge of the truth, nor destitute of evidences of a saving interest in it.

Thus, let a Christian be involved in the greatest perplexity, there is still the voice of prayer in his bosom, and still the goings up and actings of a living faith upon the Son of God who has been manifested to his soul, still the firm anchorings of hope within the veil. He is not like a sailor cast upon a wide ocean without rudder, chart, or compass. He knows what to do; he knows what course to steer; he knows the land to which his eyes are ever directed. Let him sink into the greatest perplexity, he still knows there is at the right hand of the Father a Jesus, upon whom help is laid as one that is mighty.

Still, still the solemn fact is recorded deep in his mind, an ineffaceable impression has been left upon his soul from former discoveries of the King in his beauty, that this Jesus is able to save to the uttermost all who come unto God by him. Thus he is not left without resource, help, or hope.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Philpot, Joseph Charles. "Commentary on Psalms 46:1". Commentary by J.C.Philpot on select texts of the Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jcp/psalms-46.html.

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