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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Psalms 46:9

 

 

He makes wars to cease to the end of the earth; He breaks the bow and cuts the spear in two; He burns the chariots with fire.

Adam Clarke Commentary

He maketh wars to cease - By the death of Cambyses, and setting Darius, son of Hystaspes, upon the Persian throne, he has tranquillized the whole empire. That same God who for our unfaithfulness has delivered us into the hands of our enemies, and subjected us to a long and grievous captivity and affliction, has now turned our captivity, and raised us up the most powerful friends and protectors in the very place in which we have been enduring so great a fight of afflictions.

He breaketh the bow - He has rendered useless all the implements of war; and so profound and secure is the general tranquillity, that the bow may be safely broken, the spear snapped asunder, and the chariot burnt in the fire.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Psalms 46:9". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/psalms-46.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

He maketh wars to cease unto the end of the earth - Either in all the land, or in all the world. The overthrow of the Assyrian army would probably put an end to all the wars then raging in the world. The Assyrian empire was then the most mighty on the globe; it was engaged in wide schemes of conquest; it had already overrun many of the smaller kingdoms of the world Isaiah 37:18-20; and it hoped to complete its conquests, and to secure the ascendancy over the entire earth, by the subjugation of India and Egypt. When the vast army of that empire, engaged in such a purpose, was overthrown, the consequence would be that the nations would be at rest, or that there would be universal peace. Compare the notes at Isaiah 14:6-7.

He breaketh the bow, and cutteth the spear in sunder - That is, he makes them useless, as a bow that is broken is of no value, or a spear that is cut into parts.

He burneth the chariot in the fire - The war-chariot, that which was employed in battle. See the notes at Isaiah 2:7; notes at Psalm 20:7. The expression here may refer to a custom of collecting the spoils of war into a heap, and setting them on fire. This was particularly done when the victors were unable to remove them, or so to secure them as to preclude all danger of their being taken again and used against themselves. Tiffs custom is alluded to by Virgil, AEn. viii. 561,562,

Qualis cram, cum primam aciem Prseneste sub ipsa

Stravi, scutorumque iucendi victor acervos.”

The idea here is, that God had wholly overthrown the foe, and had prevented all danger of his returning again for purposes of conquest.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Psalms 46:9". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/psalms-46.html. 1870.

The Biblical Illustrator

Psalms 46:9

He maketh wars to cease unto the ends of the earth; He breaketh the bow, and cutteth the spear in sunder; He burneth the chariot in the fire.

War

I. As it affects the happiness of mankind. Think of--

1. Its rapid extinction of innumerable lives without concern.

2. Think of the manner of their death. Far from their native home, no tender assiduities of friendship, no well-known voice, no wife, or mother, or sister, is near to soothe their sorrows, relieve their thirst, or close their eyes in death. Unhappy man! and must you be swept into the grave unnoticed and unnumbered, and no friendly tear be shed for your sufferings, or mingled with your dust?

3. But think, also, of the condition of those countries which are the scene of hostilities. How dreadful to hold everything at the mercy of an enemy.

II. The influence of war upon the morals of mankind. It is both the offspring and the parent of injustice. The injury which the morals of a people sustain from an invading army is prodigious. The agitation and suspense universally prevalent are incompatible with everything which requires calm thought or serious reflection. In such a situation is it any wonder the duties of piety fall into neglect, the sanctuary of God is forsaken, and the gates of Zion mourn and are desolate? Familiarized to the sight of rapine and slaughter, the people must acquire a hard and unfeeling character. Let us now turn to the pleasing part of our subject, which invites us to contemplate the reasons for gratitude and joy suggested by the restoration of peace. Permit me to express my hope, that along with peace the spirit of peace will return. How can we better imitate our Heavenly Father, than, when tie is pleased to compose the animosities of nations, to open our hearts to every milder influence? Let us hope, more mutual forbearance, a more candid construction of each other’s views and sentiments will prevail. No end can now be answered by the revival of party disputes. Our public and private affections are no longer at variance. That benevolence which embraces the world is now in perfect harmony with the tenderness that endears our country. Burying in oblivion, therefore, all national antipathies, together with those cruel jealousies and suspicions which have too much marred the pleasures of mutual intercourse, let our hearts correspond to the blessings we celebrate, and keep pace, as far as possible, with the movements of Divine beneficence. (Robert Hall, M. A.)

Methods for abolishing war

There are three methods at least adapted to crush this monster of war, and to banish it from the habitations of men. One is political, another is educational, and the other is Christian. The one pertains to the science of government, the other to the science of teaching, and the other to the science of remedial mercy. The first is good, the second is better, the third is best of all--it is infallible.

I. Thy, political method. There is, I think, a form of human government adapted not only to arrest the progress of this demon, but to bind him in indissoluble chains. What is it? A cosmopolitan administration, a great federal government for the world, a government which shall bear, with some modification, the same relation to all the present kingdoms of the earth, as the Government of America to all the States with which it is united, or as the various counties and boroughs of England to the British rule. But how would such a world-wide government “cause wars to cease from the ends of the earth”?

1. It would promote free mercantile intercourse. Mutual temporal interests, if not strong enough to bind hearts in harmony, are strong enough to yoke limbs and brains together in a common work.

2. It would lead to the destruction of nationalities. Nationality is a “middle wall of partition” that keeps men asunder, and makes those on each side feel jealous and suspicious of the other. It is a false glass through which we look at other nations. A glass which magnifies their vices and minifies their virtues. Nationality is an insolent, swaggering, greedy, heartless monster on the earth.

3. It would lead to the abolition of the despotic power. Who are the men that create wars? Not the people--not the farmer, the manufacturer, not the mechanic, and the labourer; but the arrogant and ruthless despots who by villainy or fortune have gained their way to power. Such men would have but little power in a thoroughly cosmopolitan government.

II. The educational method. What is this method? The indoctrinating of men with a true knowledge of their duty, their rights, and their interest. Whence is the knowledge of duty to be obtained? We have the revelation of an infallible ethical Teacher--One who was sent into the world by God to teach man his duty both to himself and his fellow-man.

1. Work into the people of the earth the conviction that all men are equal in the sight of God, that one man has rights as well as another, that each holds his being and his powers in trust from the Almighty, and must render to Him an account at last. And what then? Why then every man would respect his own individuality, employ his own individual talents, and work out his own individual beliefs, and despots would have to fight their own battles; men would no longer consent to be engines worked by tyrants.

2. Were men permeated with this true idea of their obligation to their fellow-men, could war exist a day? No. Men would feel that war was not only a curse to the community, destroying the Jives of men and the means of human support, creating misery in all directions, and entailing poverty on posterity, but also a huge crime before Almighty God.

3. War is a tremendous mistake, not only in morals, but in policy. In what does the interest of a nation consist? In the means of support, comfort, and education. On what do these depend? On the amount of a nation’s skilled industry. Anything that checks productive industry is a national curse. War is the greatest adversary to the prosperity of a community; war is destruction, both of the produce and of the producing power.

III. The Christian method. What is this method? The conquering of evil by good. This is something higher than ethics, Diviner than all mere human teaching. This is the essence of Christianity. Christianity is essentially pacific. This may be argued from the teachings of the New Testament, from the biography of Christ, which is Christianity, and from the fact that its universal triumph will issue in universal peace. (Homilist.)


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Bibliography
Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "Psalms 46:9". The Biblical Illustrator. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/psalms-46.html. 1905-1909. New York.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

He maketh wars to cease unto the ends of the earth,.... As at the birth of Christ, the Prince of peace, in the times of Augustus Caesar, when there was a general peace in the world, though it did not last long; and in the times of Constantine, signified by silence in heaven for half an hour, Revelation 8:1; when for a while there was a cessation from wars and persecution; and as will be in the latter day, and which is here chiefly designed; when nations shall learn war no more, and Christ's kingdom will take place; of which and its peace there shall be no end, Isaiah 2:4. The consideration of which may serve to relieve distressed minds under terrible apprehensions of present troubles and public calamities;

he breaketh the bow, and cutteth the spear in sunder; he burneth the chariot in the fire; that is, "chariots", or "carts"F25עגלות "plaustra", Pagninus, Montanus, Vatablus, Musculus, Gejerus, Michaelis. or "wagons", in which, as Aben Ezra observes, arms and provision were carried for the use of soldiers; the Targum renders it "round shields"F26So the Septuagint, Vulgate Latin, Ethiopic and Arabic versions. : and the destroying of all these military weapons and carriages is a token of peace, and of war's being caused to cease, there being no more use for them; with this compare Ezekiel 39:8. It was usual to burn the arms of enemies taken in warF1Vid. Lydium de Re Militari, l. 6. c. 4. p. 229, 230. .


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Psalms 46:9". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/psalms-46.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

The usual weapons of war (Psalm 7:12), as well as those using them, are brought to an end.


Copyright Statement
These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Psalms 46:9". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/psalms-46.html. 1871-8.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

He maketh wars to cease unto the end of the earth; he breaketh the bow, and cutteth the spear in sunder; he burneth the chariot in the fire.

To cease — He hath settled as in a firm and well-grounded peace.

The land — Of Israel: from one end of it to the other.

The bow — The bows and spears, and chariots of their enemies.


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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Psalms 46:9". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/psalms-46.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Psalms 46:9 He maketh wars to cease unto the end of the earth; he breaketh the bow, and cutteth the spear in sunder; he burneth the chariot in the fire.

Ver. 9. He maketh wars to cease] As the Lord putteth the sword in commission, bathing it in heaven; so he can quiet it, and command it up at his pleasure. He did so when Sisera was slain, and when Sennacherib. The Church hath her halcyons.

He breaketh the bow, &c.] "No weapon formed against thee shall prosper," Isaiah 54:17. The Spanish Armada was set forth with infinite labour and expense; but soon dispersed and defeated.

He burneth the chariots] In quibus instrumenta bellica vel victualia pro militibus circumgestant, saith Aben Ezra, i.e. their carriages for ammunition and provisions.


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Psalms 46:9". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/psalms-46.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Psalms 46:9. He maketh wars to cease, &c.— He hath destroyed the artillery of war, to the end of the earth, or the land. Comp. Psalms 76:3. He destroyed the whole apparatus and furniture of war, so that there was none left in all the country. Dr. Delaney is of opinion, that this Psalm was written in consequence of David's victory over Hadadezer, and that it may be clearly inferred from this verse, He breaketh the bow, &c. See 2 Samuel 8:4.


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Bibliography
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Psalms 46:9". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/psalms-46.html. 1801-1803.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

He hath ended our wars, and settled us in a firm and well-grounded peace.

The end of the earth, or of this land, to wit, of Israel; from one end of it to the other.

He speaks of the bows, and spears, and chariots of their enemies; for he preserved those which belonged to his people.


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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Psalms 46:9". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/psalms-46.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

9. Burneth the chariot in the fire—This, according to Ezekiel 39:9-10, would mean that the chariots should serve as common fuel for the inhabitants. Thus what was intended as an engine of destruction, God converts into the humblest use of peaceful life. Thus the sword also shall be beaten into the ploughshare, Isaiah 2:4. God will rebuke the pride and ambition of man. The allusion to the war chariot could apply only to Sennacherib’s army, not to the Arabians in Jehoshaphat’s reign, (2 Chronicles 20,) and is decisive against dating the psalm at the latter invasion. See the introduction to Psalms 47


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Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Psalms 46:9". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/psalms-46.html. 1874-1909.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Throne. Christ reigns over the heart with all power, Matthew xxviii. 18.


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Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Psalms 46:9". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/psalms-46.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

bow . . . spear . . . chariot. The weapons of war, corresponding with the preceding line war. See the Structure above.


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Psalms 46:9". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/psalms-46.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

He maketh wars to cease unto the end of the earth; he breaketh the bow, and cutteth the spear in sunder; he burneth the chariot in the fire.

He maketh wars to cease unto the end of the earth. When He has destroyed the ambitious world-powers which caused wars, then peace ensues "unto the end of the earth." Compare Isaiah 14:4-7.

He breaketh the bow, and cutteth the spear in sunder; he burneth the chariot in the fire - namely, the bow, the spear, and the chariot of the hostile world-power (Psalms 76:3). The overthrew of Sennacherib and the consequent quiet, is an earnest of the final triumph of the Prince of Peace, and of the previous destruction of all who now disturb the earth (Isaiah 2:4; Hosea 2:18; Zechariah 9:10).


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Psalms 46:9". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/psalms-46.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(9) He maketh.—Comp. Virg. Æn., .


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Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Psalms 46:9". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/psalms-46.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

He maketh wars to cease unto the end of the earth; he breaketh the bow, and cutteth the spear in sunder; he burneth the chariot in the fire.
maketh
Isaiah 2:4; 11:9; 60:18; Micah 4:3,4
breaketh
76:3-6; Ezekiel 39:3,9,10
burneth
Joshua 11:6,9; Micah 5:10

Copyright Statement
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Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Psalms 46:9". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/psalms-46.html.

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