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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Psalms 49:19

 

 

He shall go to the generation of his fathers; They will never see the light.

Adam Clarke Commentary

They shall never see light - Rise again they shall; but they shall never see the light of glory, for there is prepared for them the blackness of darkness for ever.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Psalms 49:19". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/psalms-49.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

He shall go to the generation of his fathers - To be gathered to one‘s own people, or to his fathers, is a common expression in the Old Testament in speaking of death. See Genesis 25:8, Genesis 25:17; Genesis 35:29; Genesis 49:29, Genesis 49:33, Numbers 20:24, Numbers 20:26; Numbers 27:13; Numbers 31:2; Deuteronomy 32:50; Judges 2:10. It means that they were united again with those who had gone before them, in the regions of the dead. Death had indeed separated them, but by death they were again united.

They shall never see light - He and the “generation” to which he has gone to be united, would no more see the light of this world; no more walk among the living: Job 33:30. Compare the notes at Isaiah 38:11; notes at Psalm 27:13. The meaning is, that the rich sinner will die as others have done before him, leaving all his earthly possessions, and will no more be permitted to revisit the world where his forsaken possessions are, and will not even be permitted to “look” on what before had been to him such a source of self-confidence, self-gratulation, and pride.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Psalms 49:19". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/psalms-49.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

He shall go to the generation of his fathers,.... Be gathered to them at death; or "to the dwelling place of his fathers"F13עד־דור "ad habitationem", Gejerus. ; either the grave, or hell, or both; the habitation of his wicked ancestors: unless the words be rendered, as they are by some, though "he shall come to the age of his fathers"F14"Usque ad aetatem", Junius & Tremellius, Piscator. ; live as long as they have done; yet he must die at last, and leave all behind, as they have done;

they shall never see light; neither he nor his fathers; they shall never see light of the sun any more, nor return to the light of the living, but shall lie in the dark and silent grave until the resurrection; or rather, they shall never enjoy eternal light, glory, and happiness. The ultimate state of glory is sometimes expressed by "light"; John 8:12; this the people of God, such who are made light in the Lord, and are the children of the day, shall see; but wicked men shall not; they will be cast into outer darkness, where are weeping, wailing, and gnashing of teeth.


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Psalms 49:19". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/psalms-49.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

o He shall go to the generation of his fathers; p they shall never see light.

(o) And not pass the term appointed for life.

(p) Both they and their fathers will live here but a while and at length die forever.


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Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Psalms 49:19". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/psalms-49.html. 1599-1645.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

He shall go to the generation of his fathers; they shall never see light.

He — Now he returns to the third person: such changes are frequent in this book.

Go — To the grave and hell, where he shall meet with his wicked parents, who by their counsel and example, led him into his evil courses.

See — Neither the light of this life, to which they shall never return: nor of the next life, to which they shall never be admitted.


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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Psalms 49:19". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/psalms-49.html. 1765.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

19He shall come to the age of his fathers He proceeds to show how false are the flatteries by which the wicked deceive themselves, and are deceived by others. Be they ever so intoxicated with the praises of the world, or with their own vain imaginations, yet they cannot live beyond the age of their fathers; and, granting their life to be extended to the longest term, it can never stretch into eternity. Others understand the expression as synonymous with their being gathered to the tomb along with their fathers who have gone before them; as in Scripture death is usually called “The way of all the earth.” The Psalmist, a little above, had spoken of their being gathered together in the grave as sheep in a fold. According to this view, the meaning of the passage is, that having never aspired after heaven, but having been sunk in the low grovelling pursuits of this world, they would come at last to the same fate with their fathers. When it is added, They shall not see the light even for ever, we are to understand their consignment to everlasting darkness. (235) In my opinion, both clauses of the verse combine to express the same truth, That however they may flatter and deceive themselves, they cannot prolong their life beyond the common term of mortality. As either interpretation, however, agrees with the general scope of the psalm, the reader may choose for himself. Should the latter be adopted, the words in the close of the verse are to be considered as asserting that the ungodly can only enjoy the light of life for a short period, as they have no hope of another existence beyond the grave. We are taught by the Psalmist, in the words which have been under our consideration, to beware of flattering ourselves in the possessions of this world, and to be principally anxious for the attainment of that happiness which is reserved for us in heaven. We are also warned not to allow ourselves to be carried away by the erring influence of worldly applause. Even heathen authors have taught us the same lesson. Thus the poet Persius says, —

Non si quid turbida Roma
Elevet, accedas, examenve improbum in illa
Castiges trutina: nec te quaesiveris extra
,” —

“If Rome, a city full of commotions, exalt or despise any thing, beware of being satisfied with its weight or balance; that is to say, of stopping at its judgment; and do not look to what others say of you, but enter into thyself, and examine what thou art.” (236) But the disposition to be deceived by flattery is one so strongly marked in our nature, as to require that we should attend to the weightier admonition of one who was inspired.


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Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Psalms 49:19". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/psalms-49.html. 1840-57.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Psalms 49:19 He shall go to the generation of his fathers; they shall never see light.

Ver. 19. He shall go to the generation of his fathers] i.e. To the grave, or albeit he come to the age of his fathers, that is, live here very long.

They shall never see light] Either have any sound comfort at death or any part in God’s kingdom.


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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Psalms 49:19". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/psalms-49.html. 1865-1868.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Now he returns again to the third person. Such sudden and repeated changes are frequent in this book.

To the generation of his fathers, i.e. to the grave and hell, where he shall meet with his wicked parents, who by their counsel and example led him into his evil courses; as the godly also are said to be gathered to their fathers, Genesis 15:15 Deuteronomy 32:50 Jude 2:10.

Never see, i.e. never enjoy, as seeing is oft taken.

Light; neither the light of the living, as it is called, Job 33:30 Psalms 56:13; or of this life, to which they shall never return; nor of the next life to which they shall never be admitted, but they shall be cast into utter darkness, Matthew 8:12.


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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Psalms 49:19". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/psalms-49.html. 1685.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

He shall = [Yet] he shall, &c, continuing from Psalms 49:18.

his: i.e. the man"s.

They: i.e. those fathers.


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Psalms 49:19". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/psalms-49.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

He shall go to the generation of his fathers; they shall never see light.

He - or, 'it (the soul) shall go,' for the Hebrew verb is feminine. Hengstenberg takes it second person, 'THOU shalt go,' etc.; but then there must be supposed a sudden transition to the third person again, "to the generation of HIS fathers." I therefore prefer the third person. The generation of his fathers are those that are fathers not merely of flesh and blood, but in wickedness.

They shall never see light - neither the light of the sun that enlightens our world, nor that of the better sun that gladdens the beatified saints (Revelation 21:23).


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Psalms 49:19". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/psalms-49.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(19) They shall never.—Better, who will never again look on the light, i.e., “never live again,” implying, in contrast, a hope of a resurrection for the upright. (See Note Psalms 49:14.)


Copyright Statement
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Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Psalms 49:19". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/psalms-49.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

He shall go to the generation of his fathers; they shall never see light.
He
Heb. The soul.
Ecclesiastes 3:21; 12:7; Luke 12:20; 16:22,23
to the generation
Genesis 15:15; 1 Kings 16:6
never
56:13; Job 33:30; Matthew 8:12; 22:13; Jude 1:13

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Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Psalms 49:19". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/psalms-49.html.

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