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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Psalms 49:2

 

 

Both low and high, Rich and poor together.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Both low and high - Those alike of humble and those of exalted rank, for it pertains equally to all. On the meaning of the “terms” employed here, see the notes at Isaiah 2:9. These truths pertained to the “low;” that is, to those of humble rank, as teaching them not to envy the rich, and not to fear their power; and they pertained to those of exalted rank, as teaching them not to trust in their riches, and not to suppose that they could permanently possess and enjoy them.

Rich and poor together - As equally interested in these truths; that is, What the psalmist was about to say was adapted to impart useful lessons to both classes. Both needed instruction on the subject; and the same class of truths was adapted to furnish that instruction. The class of truths referred to was derived from the powerlessness of wealth in regard to the things of most importance to man, and from the fact that all which a man can gain must soon be left: teaching those of one class that they should not set their heart on wealth, and should not pride themselves on possessing it, and teaching the other class that they should not envy or fear the possessor of riches.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Psalms 49:2". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/psalms-49.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Both low and high,.... Or "both the sons of Adam and the sons of men". By the sons of "Adam" are meant the multitude of the people, as Ben Melech explains it; the common people, the meaner sort, the base things of this world; and such are they, generally speaking, who are called by grace under the Gospel dispensation: and by "the sons of men" are meant the princes, nobles, and great men of the earth; men of high birth and illustrious extraction: so Adam is rendered, "the mean man", and "Ish", the word here used, "the great man", in Isaiah 2:9. And though not many, yet some of this sort are called by grace; and all of them have a peculiar concern in many things spoken of in this psalm; see Psalm 49:12;

rich and poor together: these are called upon to hearken to what is after said, that the one may not be elated with and trust in their riches, and that the other may not be dejected on account of their poverty; and seeing both must die, and meet together at the judgment day; and inasmuch as the Gospel is preached to one as to another; and for the most part the poor hear it, receive it, and are called by it.


Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Psalms 49:2". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/psalms-49.html. 1999.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Psalms 49:2 Both low and high, rich and poor, together.

Ver. 2. Both low and high, rich and poor together] Heb. Both sons of Adam, or earthy man, and sons of Ish, or nobleman

quorum

Ex meliore luto finxit praecordia Titan.

Diogenes once made a like outcry at Athens, Aκουσατε ανδρες, Hear, O ye men; and when a company came about him expecting what he would say to them, he looked upon them and said, Aνδρας εκαλεσα ου ακθαρματα, I called for men, and not for slaves (varlets).


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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Psalms 49:2". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/psalms-49.html. 1865-1868.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

2. Low and high—The classifications of this verse are intended, by mentioning the extreme orders of society, to comprehend all the intermediate ranks also, without exception. They are specifications under the general terms “all nations,” “all inhabitants of the age.” See note on Psalms 4:2


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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Psalms 49:2". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/psalms-49.html. 1874-1909.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Beauty. This may refer to God, or to Sion, (Calmet) where the Church of Christ began. (Worthington)


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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Psalms 49:2". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/psalms-49.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

low = sons of "adam. App-14.

high = sons of ish. App-14.

poor = helpless. Hebrew. "ebyon. See note on Proverbs 6:11,

together = alike.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Psalms 49:2". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/psalms-49.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Both low and high, rich and poor, together.

Both low and high - literally, sons of an ordinary man [ 'aadaam (Hebrew #120)], and sons of a distinguished man [ 'iysh (Hebrew #376)]. The Psalmist's monitions will warn the rich (Psalms 49:6-7; Psalms 49:17) and console the poor (Psalms 49:15-16).


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Psalms 49:2". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/psalms-49.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(2) Both high and low.—The two Hebrew expressions here used, benê-âdam and benê-îsh, answer to one another much as homo and vir in Latin. The LXX. and Vulg., taking âdam in its primary sense, render “sons of the soil and sons of men.” Symmachus makes the expressions stand for men in general and men as individuals.

Shall be of understanding.—The copula supplied by the Authorised Version is unnecessary. The word rendered meditation may mean, from its etymology, “muttered thoughts,” and it is quite consistent to say, my musings speak of understanding. So LXX. and Vulgate.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Psalms 49:2". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/psalms-49.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Both low and high, rich and poor, together.
62:9; 1 Samuel 2:7,8; Job 34:19; Proverbs 22:2; Jeremiah 5:4,5; James 1:9-11; 2:1-7; Revelation 6:15-17

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Psalms 49:2". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/psalms-49.html.

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