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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Psalms 53:6

 

 

Oh, that the salvation of Israel would come out of Zion! When God restores His captive people, Let Jacob rejoice, let Israel be glad.

Adam Clarke Commentary

O that the salvation of Israel were come out of Zion! - I have already shown that the proper translation is, "Who shall give from Zion salvation to Israel?" The word salvation is in the plural here, deliverances: but many MSS., with the Septuagint, Vulgate, Arabic, and Anglo-Saxon, have it in the singular.

When God brinyeth back - When Jehovah bringeth back, is the reading of more than twenty of Kennicott's and De Rossi's MSS., with the Septuagint, Syriac, and Chaldee, and Justinianus' Polyglot Psalter.

For larger notes and an analysis, the reader is requested to refer to Psalm 14:1-7; and for a comparison of the two Psalms he may consult Dr. Kennicott's Hebrew Bible, where, under Psalm 14:1-7, in the lower margin, the variations are exhibited at one view.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Psalms 53:6". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/psalms-53.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Oh that the salvation of Israel … - The only change here from Psalm 14:7 is that the word אלהים 'Elohiym God, is substituted for “Jehovah,” Lord, and that the word rendered “salvation” is here in the plural. On the supposition that the psalm was adapted to a state of things when the city had been besieged, and the enemy discomfited, this language would express the deep and earnest desire of the people that the Lord would grant deliverance. Perhaps it may be supposed, also, that at the time of such a siege, and while the Lord interposed to save them from the siege, it was also true that there was some general danger hanging over the people; that even the nation might be described as in some sense “captive;” or that some portions of the land were subject to a foreign power. The desire expressed is, that the deliverance might be complete, and that the whole land might be brought to the possession of liberty, and be rescued from all foreign domination. That time, when it should arrive, would be the occasion of universal rejoicing.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Psalms 53:6". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/psalms-53.html. 1870.

The Biblical Illustrator

Psalms 53:6

Oh that the salvation of Israel were come out of Zion.

The salvation of the Church, and the destruction of her enemies

I. The destruction of the wicked (Psalms 53:5).

1. Utter and irreversible.

2. Effected by God.

3. Overtaking them when they regarded themselves as quite secure.

4. Inflicted because of their hostility to the people of God.

II. The destruction of the wicked in former times as an encouragement to the good to expect salvation from present dangers. This we take to be the connecting link between Psalms 53:5; Psalms 6:1-10.

1. The poetic view of salvation. It is here represented as deliverance from captivity.

2. The grand source of salvation. “Out of Zion.”

3. The earnest desire of salvation.

4. The encouragement to expect salvation. God is unchangeable. What He has done in the past He is able to do in the present. He is faithful. What He has promised that will He perform. (W. Jones.)
.

Psalms 54:1-7


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Bibliography
Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "Psalms 53:6". The Biblical Illustrator. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/psalms-53.html. 1905-1909. New York.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

O that the salvation of Israel were come out of Zion!.... Or, "who will giveF6מי יתן "quis dabit", V. L. Pagninus, Montanus, &c. out of Zion the salvation of Israel?" The Targum adds, "except the Lord"; and this is a request to him for it: and, as in Psalm 14:7, it may be a wish for the first coming of Christ, to work out salvation for his people; here it may be expressive of the desire of the church for his coming in a spiritual manner, in the latter day, to take to himself his great power, and reign; to destroy antichrist, and deliver his people from bondage and oppression by him; when the Gentiles shall be gathered in, the Jews will be converted, and all Israel saved; see Romans 11:25. It is in the original text, "salvations"F7ישעות "salutes", Pagninus, Montanus, Cocceius; so Ainsworth. ; denoting the complete salvation of the church; when all her enemies will be destroyed, and all peace and prosperity shall be enjoyed by her; See Gill on Psalm 14:6.

when God bringeth back the captivity of his people: who have been carried into it by antichrist, Revelation 13:10;

Jacob shall rejoice, and Israel shall be glad; for now the kingdoms of this world will become Christ's; the marriage of the Lamb will be come, and the bride made ready, through the calling of the Gentiles, and the conversion of the Jews; which will occasion the twenty four elders, the representatives of the Christian church, to give thanks to the Lord God Almighty, and cause many voices to be heard in heaven, expressing great joy on this occasion, Revelation 11:15.


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
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Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Psalms 53:6". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/psalms-53.html. 1999.

Keil & Delitzsch Commentary on the Old Testament

The two texts now again coincide. Instead of ישׁוּעת , we here have ישׁעות ; the expression is strengthened, the plural signifies entire, full, and final salvation.


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The Keil & Delitzsch Commentary on the Old Testament is a derivative of a public domain electronic edition.

Bibliography
Keil, Carl Friedrich & Delitzsch, Franz. "Commentary on Psalms 53:6". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/kdo/psalms-53.html. 1854-1889.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Psalms 53:6 Oh that the salvation of Israel [were come] out of Zion! When God bringeth back the captivity of his people, Jacob shall rejoice, [and] Israel shall be glad.

Ver. 6. Oh that the salvation] Heb. Salvations; indicat plenam salutem, Let it show full salvation, saith Kimchi.


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Psalms 53:6". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/psalms-53.html. 1865-1868.

Sermon Bible Commentary

Psalms 53:6

I. The salvation of Israel is needed.

II. It is promised.

III. Christians are bound to seek it by personal effort and prayer.

W. M. Punshon, Sermons, p. 118.


References: Psalm 54—A. Maclaren, Life of David, p. 100. Psalms 55:4.—J. E. Vaux, Sermon Notes, 1st series, p. 58. Psalms 55:5.—W. M. Statham, Christian World Pulpit, vol. xv., p. 248.




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Bibliography
Nicoll, William R. "Commentary on Psalms 53:6". "Sermon Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/sbc/psalms-53.html.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Psalms 53:6. Oh that the salvation, &c.— David here, making a review of the 14th Psalm, in which his distress in the time of Absalom's rebellion is described, desires of God to give his people a still further and new salvation; for the word ישׁעות ieshuoth, here is in the plural number, but in Psalms 14 it is in the singular; and therefore here it may be fitly rendered a complete salvation, or deliverance. The word captivity, in the next clause, is no objection to the interpretation above given of this Psalm; for it sometimes signifies no more than a great desolation, such as was that of Job's estate and family. See Job 42:10.

REFLECTIONS.—We have here,

1. The practical atheism of the natural heart. We first leave God far above out of our sight, and then dare sin securely.

2. The universal guilt of mankind is asserted. Not some, or a few in one age or nation, but all in every age, in every nation, have come short of the glory of God.

3. The greatness of this guilt is noticed, as flowing from that deep and desperate corruption in the nature of man, which produces abominable iniquity in the practice; particularly selfishness, covetousness, oppression, and habitual neglect of prayer. Note; Sin is the abominable thing which God hates: the least spot of it, uncleansed, must eternally exclude us from his presence.

4. The folly, as well as the wickedness, of sinners is great: they live without consideration; they have no knowledge of themselves, or of God; of their guilt here, or their ruin hereafter; the god of this world hath blinded their eyes.

5. Their security will be shortly at an end, and terrors overtake the finally impenitent. They shall be in great fear, where before they laughed at danger; ruin unavoidable shall destroy them, everlasting confusion cover them, and God shall despise their impotent resistance.

6. The Psalmist concludes with an earnest wish, that God would hasten the salvation of his faithful people, rescue them from amid the world which lieth in wickedness, and cause them to rejoice in Jesus, their glorious Redeemer and Saviour. Note; (1.) Though we are all by nature formed from the same mass of corruption, they who have justifying and sanctifying faith in the blood of Jesus, are saved from the pollutions which are in the world. (2.) All sinners, of whatever rank or degree, and especially those who in the spirit of Antichrist oppose the power of true religion, and persecute its professors, will perish together, in the day when the triumphs of God's saints shall be completed. (3.) We shall assuredly join the Psalmist's prayer, if our hearts possess his hopes, and cry, Come, Lord Jesus, come quickly.


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Bibliography
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Psalms 53:6". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/psalms-53.html. 1801-1803.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

A Final Cry That Israel/Judah Might Be Freed From The Yoke That is Upon Them (Psalms 53:6).

Psalms 53:6

‘Oh that the salvation of Israel were come out of Zion!

When God brings back the captivity of (or ‘restores the fortunes of’) his people,

Then will Jacob rejoice,

Israel will be glad.’

These words bring the Psalm back on track as parallel with Psalms 14, being almost word for word the same. The psalmist finishes on a note of longing for Israel’s final deliverance when their king will rule to the ends of the earth (Psalms 2:8) and they will thus experience such invasions no more. ‘O that Israel’s deliverance had come’. This confirms that they are here seen as having been under some kind of misfortune. In Job 42:10 the verb is translated ‘restores the fortunes’ and clearly signifies a restoring of fortunes to Job. He is only a captive to his misery. And this fits all the other places where the verb is used. Thus it is possibly the best translation here. It could therefore refer to a period of subjection under the Philistines, or some other enemy of Israel, and a prayer for deliverance from it. But the prayer is finally not just for deliverance but for final deliverance when God’s final purpose of deliverance for His people comes about through the establishing of God’s everlasting rule Psalms 2:8-9; 2 Samuel 7:13; 2 Samuel 7:16; Isaiah 9:6-7; Isaiah 11:1-4. And as a consequence of the restoring of their fortunes Jacob (Israel) will rejoice, and Israel will be glad.

But even if we translate as being in ‘captivity’, it would not necessarily mean exile. It could equally signify being in subjection in the land. So we are possibly to see them here as being under the iron rule of some foreign monarch, subject to tribute and in a period when they were being treated badly. ‘From Zion’ probably has in mind Mount Zion from which, speaking in an earthly way, God will act. Or the thought may be that the psalmist was looking to Zion’s king, the anointed of YHWH, to bring about the deliverance. Either way the deliverance will be of God. And that is the final certainty, that God will restore His people. And then they will be glad and rejoice.

‘Brings back the captivity’, or ‘restores the fortunes’, of His people.’ See for the use of the phrase Job 42:10; Hosea 6:11; Amos 9:14; Ezekiel 16:53; Zephaniah 2:7.

So the message of the Psalm is of God’s calling to account the folly of the nations, both as regards Himself, and especially as revealed in their attitude towards His people, having very much in mind here His true people. The thought is that His being and nature are so obvious in the light of creation and conscience, and His people so precious, that humanly speaking, from the psalmist’s point of view, God could only question the behaviour of the world in its treatment of Him and His people and see it as folly. And it ends on the positive note that salvation is yet coming for His people.


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Bibliography
Pett, Peter. "Commentary on Psalms 53:6". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/psalms-53.html. 2013.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

3. Yearning for God"s reign53:6

David longed for the time when God would initiate salvation for Israel from Zion. When he wrote, Israel was at least partially under a hostile foreign power"s control. The psalmist believed God would one day restore His people and cause them to rejoice. Because of other Revelation , we know that when Jesus Christ comes back to reign He will reestablish Israel as His favored nation and will punish her enemies (cf. Psalm 2; Isaiah 27:12; Isaiah 43:5-7; Jeremiah 12:15; Ezekiel 20:34-38; Ezekiel 20:42; Ezekiel 28:25-26; Daniel 7:13-14; Hosea 12:9; Joel 3:1-2; Amos 9:14-15; Micah 4:6; Zephaniah 3:20; Zechariah 10:10). [Note: See John F. Walvoord, Israel in Prophecy, pp115-31.]

It is foolish to disregard God (cf. Proverbs 1:7). Those who do so will experience present futility in their lives and future judgment for their folly.


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Bibliography
Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on Psalms 53:6". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/psalms-53.html. 2012.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

Psalms 53:6. O that the salvation, &c. — See on Psalms 14:7.


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Bibliography
Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on Psalms 53:6". Joseph Benson's Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/psalms-53.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Behold. He admires how God delivered him, though Saul seemed to have only one step more to take. Jesus Christ was secure amid the persecutions of the Jews, till he was pleased to deliver himself up, John x. 18. (Calmet)


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Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Psalms 53:6". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/psalms-53.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

Oh. Figure of speech Ecphonesis. App-6.

salvation = great salvation, plural of majesty. But some codices, with Septuagint and Syriac, read singular.

Zion. See App-68.

God. Some codices, with Aramaean, Septuagint, and Syriac, read "Jehovah".

Jacob . . . Israel: i.e. both natural and spiritual seed. See notes on Genesis 32:28; Genesis 43:6; Genesis 45:26, Genesis 45:28. To the chief Musician. This Psalm was edited for public use; hence the title Elohim. See notes above.

on = relating to.

Neginoth = smitings: referring to God"s smitings with words and acts. See Psalms 53:5, which differs from Psalms 14:5-6. See App-65.


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Psalms 53:6". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/psalms-53.html. 1909-1922.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Oh that the salvation of Israel were come out of Zion! When God bringeth back the captivity of his people, Jacob shall rejoice, and Israel shall be glad.
Oh, etc
Heb. Who will give salvations, etc.
14:7
out
50:2; Isaiah 12:6; 14:32
God
Instead of elohim, "God," more than 20 MSS., with the LXX., Syriac, and Chaldee, read yehowah, "Jehovah," as in Ps 14:7.
bringeth
85:1; 126:1-4; Job 42:10; Jeremiah 30:18; 31:23; Joel 3:1; Amos 9:14
Jacob
106:46-48; Ezra 3:11; Nehemiah 12:43; Isaiah 12:1-3

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Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Psalms 53:6". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/psalms-53.html.

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