corner graphic

Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Psalms 55:16

 

 

As for me, I shall call upon God, And the LORD will save me.

Adam Clarke Commentary

I will call upon God - He foresaw his deliverance, and the defeat of his enemies and therefore speaks confidently, "The Lord shall save me;" or, as the Targum, "The Word of the Lord shall redeem me."


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Psalms 55:16". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/psalms-55.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

As for me, I will call upon God - That is, I have no other refuge in my troubles, yet I can go to him, and pour out all the desires of my heart before him.

And the Lord shall save me - This expresses strong confidence. On the supposition that the psalm refers to the rebellion of Absalom, David was driven from his home, and his throne, and from the house of God - a poor exile, forsaken by nearly all. But his faith did not fail. He confided in God, and believed that He was able to effect his deliverance, and that He would do it. Rarely can we be placed in circumstances so trying and discouraging as were those of David; never should we, in any circumstances, fall to believe, as he did, that God can deliver us, and that, if we are his friends, we shall be ultimately safe.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Psalms 55:16". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/psalms-55.html. 1870.

Coffman's Commentaries on the Bible

THE PRAYER CONTINUES

"As for me, I will call upon God; And Jehovah will save me.

Evening, and morning, and at noonday, will I complain and moan;

And he will hear my voice.

He hath redeemed my soul in peace from the battle that was against me;

For they were many that strove with me.

God will hear and answer them, even he that abideth of old. (Selah)

The men who have no changes,

And who fear not God."

The outstanding thing here is the confidence that David had of God's deliverance from the awful circumstances of the rampant rebellion.

"Jehovah will save me" (Psalms 55:16). Why was David so confident? The answer is simple enough: God specifically said to David, "Thy house and thy kingdom shall be made sure forever before thee; thy throne shall be established forever" (2 Samuel 7:16). These words of God to David through the prophet Nathan were known throughout Israel, to Ahithophel and to Absalom particularly; and their conspiracy to dethrone David was an action directed squarely against the will of God. No wonder David expressed confidence of victory. As The Jewish Targum translated this place, "The word of the Lord shall redeem me."[17]

"Evening, and at morning, and at noonday" (Psalms 55:17). Every human being is obligated to honor God with his prayers at least three times a day, a custom which was scrupulously followed by Daniel (Daniel 6:10,13). Here is evidence that David also observed the same obligation. Christians also by offering prayers and thanksgiving at mealtimes three times a day have perpetuated the custom.

"They were many that strove with me" (Psalms 55:18). The rebellion was no small affair, as indicated in 2 Samuel 15:12; 17:11, and 18:7. "The conspiracy was strong; for the people increased continually with Absalom." Hushai even spoke of arousing the whole nation "From Dan to Beersheba" to fight against David; and in the final battle between David's army and that of Absalom, "The people of Israel were smitten before the servants of David; and there was a great slaughter there that day of twenty thousand men ... and the forest devoured more people that day than the sword devoured" (2 Samuel 18:6-8). Thus there were over forty thousand casualties, indicating that those enemies of David were indeed very numerous.

"Men who have no changes ... and who fear not God" (Psalms 55:19). Some have been critical of David for not praying for the conversion of his enemies instead of for their death (as in Psalms 55:15); and the answer is right here. There was no use to pray for their conversion. They were men who would not change (or repent); they were men who had no fear whatever of God, and who were willing to oppose themselves violently against God's will regarding the Davidic kingdom.

We find little sympathy for the `holier than thou' attitude of certain commentators who prattle endlessly about "forgiving ones enemies and praying for them"; but who seem not to be outraged at all by the violent behavior of wicked men. We should say this on behalf of David's prayer in Psalms 55:6, where he prayed, "Oh that I had the wings of a dove." He did not pray for the wings of an eagle so that he could fall upon his enemies from above, but for the wings of a dove that he might get away from it all.


Copyright Statement
James Burton Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.

Bibliography
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Psalms 55:16". "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/psalms-55.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

As for me, I will call upon God,.... Not upon a creature, on idols and images, on angels or saints departed; but upon God, in his time of trouble, for salvation and deliverance from enemies; who is able to save. This is to be understood of calling upon God in prayer; as Psalm 55:17 explains it, and the Targum here renders it; though sometimes invocation of the name of God takes in the whole of divine worship;

and the Lord shall save me; which confidence was founded partly upon his promise to deliver such that call upon him in the day of trouble, Psalm 50:15; and partly upon his power, whose hand is not shortened that it cannot save. The Targum is,

"the Word of the Lord shall redeem me.'


Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Psalms 55:16". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/psalms-55.html. 1999.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

16I will call upon God. In translating this verse I have retained the future tense of the verb, as the Psalmist does not refer to something already done, but rather excites himself to the duty of prayer, and to the exercise of hope and confidence. Though there was no apparent method of escape, and he stood on the brink of immediate destruction, he declares his resolution to continue in prayer, and expresses his assurance that it would be successful. In the verse which follows he engages more particularly to show perseverance in prayer. He does not content himself with saying that he will pray, for many do this in a perfunctory manner, and soon become wearied with the exercise; but he resolves to display both assiduity and vehemency. From the particular mention he makes of evening, morning, and noon, we are left to infer that these must have been the stated hours of prayer amongst the godly at that period. Sacrifices were offered daily in the temple morning and evening, and by this they were taught to engage privately in prayer within their own houses. At noon also it was the practice to offer additional sacrifices. As we are naturally indisposed for the duty of prayer, there is a danger that we may become remiss, and gradually omit it altogether, unless we restrict ourselves to a certain rule. In appointing particular fixed hours to be observed for his worship, there can be no doubt that God had respect to the infirmity of our nature, and the same principle should be applied to the secret as to the public services of devotion, as appears from the passage now before us, and from the example of Daniel, (Daniel 9:3.) Sacrifices are no longer to be observed in the Church, but as there remains the same indisposition on our part to the duty, and an equal need of incitements to overcome it, we should still prescribe certain hours to ourselves to be observed in prayer. He adds, that he would cry aloud, to denote vehemency of supplication, under the grief and anxiety of mind to which he was subjected. He intimates, that no extremity of present trouble would prevent him from directing his complaint to God, and cherishing a confident hope of deliverance.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Psalms 55:16". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/psalms-55.html. 1840-57.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Psalms 55:16 As for me, I will call upon God; and the LORD shall save me.

Ver. 16. As for me, I will call upon God] Or, I have called upon God, sc. for good to be done to myself, Psalms 55:1, &c., and for evil to mine enemies, Psalms 55:9, &c. (of which sort of imprecations. {See Trapp on "Psalms 35:4"}

And he hath heard me] I know he hath, both for myself, Psalms 55:17-18, and against them, Psalms 55:19-21. For what reason? first, they fear not God, Psalms 55:19; secondly, they break covenant, Psalms 55:20; thirdly, they use deceit, Psalms 55:21. These courses will work their ruth and ruin.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Psalms 55:16". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/psalms-55.html. 1865-1868.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Whilst he destroys them. As they and I differ in the courses of our lives, so shall we in our ends.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Psalms 55:16". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/psalms-55.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

16. As for me—The pronoun is emphatic, and indicates the contrast between himself and his enemies. “I [or, as for me, I] will call upon God, and Jehovah will save me.” From this point the psalm rises into the serene atmosphere of faith and hope.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Psalms 55:16". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/psalms-55.html. 1874-1909.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

the LORD. Hebrew. Jehovah. App-4.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Psalms 55:16". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/psalms-55.html. 1909-1922.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

As for me, I will call upon God; and the LORD shall save me.
50:15; 73:28; 91:15; 109:4; Luke 6:11,12

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Psalms 55:16". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/psalms-55.html.

To report dead links, typos, or html errors or suggestions about making these resources more useful use our convenient contact form
Powered by Lightspeed Technology