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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Psalms 55:17

 

 

Evening and morning and at noon, I will complain and murmur, And He will hear my voice.

Adam Clarke Commentary

Evening, and morning, and at noon, will I pray - This was the custom of the pious Hebrews. See Daniel 6:10. The Hebrews began their day in the evening, and hence David mentions the evening first. The rabbins say, Men should pray three times each day, because the day changes three times. This was observed in the primitive Church; but the times, in different places, were various. The old Psalter gives this a curious turn: "At even I sall tel his louing (praise) what tim Crist was on the Crosse: and at morn I sall schew his louing, what tim he ros fra dede. And sua he sall here my voyce at mid day, that is sitand at the right hand of his fader, wheder he stegh (ascended) at mid day."


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Psalms 55:17". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/psalms-55.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Evening, and morning, and at noon, will I pray - In another place Psalm 119:164 the psalmist says that he engaged in acts of devotion seven times in a day. Daniel prayed three times a day, Daniel 6:10. David went, in his troubles, before God evening, morning, and mid-day, in solemn, earnest prayer. So Paul, in a time of great distress, gave himself on three set occasions to earnest prayer for deliverance. See the notes at 2 Corinthians 12:8. This verse, therefore, does not prove that it was a regular habit of David to pray three times a day; but in view of the passage, it may be remarked

(a) that it is proper to have regular seasons for devotion, of frequent occurrence; and

(b) that there are favorable and suitable times for devotion.

The morning and the evening are obviously appropriate; and it is well to divide the day also by prayer - to seek, at mid-day, the rest titan bodily and mental toil which is secured by communion with God - and to implore that strength which we need for the remaining duties of the day. True religion is cultivated by frequent and regular seasons of devotion.

And cry aloud - The word here employed properly means to murmur; to make a humming sound; to sigh; to growl; to groan. See the notes at Psalm 42:5. Here the language means that he would give utterance to his deep feelings in appropriate tones - whether words, sighs, or groans. To the deep thoughts and sorrows of his soul he would often give suitable expression before God.

And he shall hear my voice - The confident language of faith, as in Psalm 55:16.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Psalms 55:17". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/psalms-55.html. 1870.

The Biblical Illustrator

Psalms 55:17

Evening, and morning, and at noon, will I pray, and cry aloud: and He shall hear my voice.

Prayer

I. The nature of our prayer. Prayer is the humble expression of our wants and of our desires to Almighty God; and it comprehends, at least, the following particulars.

1. Prayer is an acknowledgment of the being and of the providence of God; “He that cometh to God must believe that He is;”--an expression of our dependence upon God; and a profession of our belief in His omnipotence, goodness, grace, and bounty--“that He is the rewarder of them that diligently seek Him.”

2. Prayer re-establishes communion between God and man. It opens and maintains intercourse with the skies.

3. Prayer is the grand means by which we obtain our spiritual blessings from the hands of God.

4. But nothing is real prayer except it arise sincerely from the heart, and is presented through Jesus Christ, the Mediator between God and man, accompanied at all times by a measure of faith (John 14:6; James 1:6-7).

II. In the manner in which the author of our text performed this duty. This was distinguished by fervour, regularity, and frequency.

1. Fervour in prayer is the earnest manner in which we breathe out our desires to God; not so much the strength of the voice, as the ardour of the soul (Romans 8:26).

2. Regularity was associated with the psalmist’s performance of this duty. He had stated times for prayer. And do not creatures, circumstanced as we are, need every help?

3. Frequency is another thing signified. (Sketches of Four Hundred Sermons.)


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Bibliography
Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "Psalms 55:17". The Biblical Illustrator. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/psalms-55.html. 1905-1909. New York.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Evening, and morning, and at noon, will I pray,.... These being the stated times of prayer with the Jews, and which continued to later ages, Daniel 6:10. These times, they sayF2Yalkut Simeoni in loc. , were fixed by Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob: the morning prayer by Abraham, according to Genesis 22:3, the prayer of the "minchah" by Isaac, according to Genesis 24:63; and the evening prayer by Jacob, according to Genesis 28:11. The prayer of the evening was at the time of the evening sacrifice, to which it is compared, Psalm 141:2. This was at the ninth hour, at which time Peter and John went up to the temple to pray; and Cornelius prayed in his own house, Acts 3:1. The prayer of the morning was at the time of the morning daily sacrifice, and was about the third hour of the day; at which time the apostles met together for prayer on the day of Pentecost, Acts 2:1; and that at noon was at the sixth hour of the day; at which time Peter went up to the housetop to pray, Acts 10:9. And now, though we are not tied down to these exact and precise times of prayer, yet this teaches us that we ought to pray frequently and constantly, and that a day should not pass without it; and the morning and evening seem to be very proper seasons for it, seeing the mercies of the Lord are new every morning; and we should be thankful for them and the mercies of the night past, and implore divine protection and grace for the day following; and at evening we should express our thankfulness for the mercies of the day, and commit ourselves and families into the hands of God, who is Israel's Keeper, that neither slumbers nor sleeps;

and cry aloud; denoting the distress he was in, the fervency of his prayer, and the importunity of it;

and he shall hear my voice; this he might be assured of, from the general character of God, as a God hearing prayer, and from his own special and particular experience of the truth of it, and from the promises made unto him.


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Psalms 55:17". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/psalms-55.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

Evening, and morning, and at noon, will I pray, m and cry aloud: and he shall hear my voice.

(m) Which signifies a servants mind and sure trust to obtain his portion, which made him earnest at all times in prayer.

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Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Psalms 55:17". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/psalms-55.html. 1599-1645.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Evening, and morning, and at noon, will I pray, and cry aloud: and he shall hear my voice.

Evening, … — The three stated times of prayer among the Jews.


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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Psalms 55:17". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/psalms-55.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Psalms 55:17 Evening, and morning, and at noon, will I pray, and cry aloud: and he shall hear my voice.

Ver. 17. Evening, and morning, and at noon, will I pray] So Daniel prayed three times a day, Daniel 6:10; and in the temple they prayed at the third, sixth, and ninth hour of the day. The saints set themselves certain hours to pray in (besides extraordinary occasions putting them upon that daily sacrifice), the better to arouse their spirits, and to keep constant intercourse with God. Papists have their set times; and Mahometans, whatever occasion they have, either by profit or pleasure, to divert them, will pray five times every day. This they do by form and custom, not by conscience: take we heed of those ordinary traitors, formality and customariness; it hath been bewailed before that many hold only a certain stint of daily duties (as malt-horses their pace, or mill-horses their round), and rest upon them when they have done, using the means as mediators, and so fall short, of Christ.

And cry aloud] Rousing up myself, and wrestling with God, not in a customary, frigid, bedulling way; but with all intention of spirit and contention of speech.

And he shall hear my voice] How should he do otherwise, I coming upon him with such earnestness? Preces fundimus, coelum tundimus, misericordias extorquemus, saith those primitive Christians whose prayers came before God as the noise of many waters, Revelation 14:2.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Psalms 55:17". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/psalms-55.html. 1865-1868.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

The three stated times of prayer amongst the Jews. See Daniel 6:10 Acts 3:1 10:3,9,30.


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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Psalms 55:17". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/psalms-55.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

17. Evening, and morning, and at noon—Either at so many stated times, as Daniel 6:10, or poetically for continual prayer, as Psalms 88:1; Ephesians 6:18


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Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Psalms 55:17". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/psalms-55.html. 1874-1909.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

pray = meditate.

cry aloud. Hebrew. hamah = to make a noise. Onomatopoetic, like bees, or the cooing of a dove in Ezekiel 7:16. See note on sub-scription.


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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Psalms 55:17". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/psalms-55.html. 1909-1922.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Evening, and morning, and at noon, will I pray, and cry aloud: and he shall hear my voice.
Evening
5:2,3; 119:62,147,148; Daniel 6:10,13; Mark 1:35; 6:46,48; Luke 18:1-7; Acts 3:1; 10:3,9,30; Ephesians 6:18; 1 Thessalonians 5:17
cry
Job 19:7; Lamentations 3:8; Hebrews 5:7

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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Psalms 55:17". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/psalms-55.html.

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