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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Psalms 55:6

 

 

I said, "Oh, that I had wings like a dove! I would fly away and be at rest.

Adam Clarke Commentary

O that I had wings like a dove! - He was so surrounded, so hemmed in on every side by his adversaries, that he could see no way for his escape unless he had wings, and could take flight. The dove is a bird of very rapid wing; and some oil them passing before his eyes at the time, might have suggested the idea expressed here.

And be at rest - Get a habitation.


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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Psalms 55:6". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/psalms-55.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

And I said - That is, when I saw these calamities coming upon me, and knew not what the result was to be.

Oh, that I had wings like a dove! - literally, “Who will give me wings like a dove?” or, Who will give me the pinion of a dove? The original word - אבר 'êber - means properly, “a wing-feather;” a pinion; the penna major or flagfeather of a bird‘s wing by which he steers his course, - as of an eagle, Isaiah 40:31, or of a dove, as here. It is distinguished from the wing itself, Ezekiel 17:3: “A great eagle, with great wings, “long-winged,” full of feathers.” The reference here is supposed to be to the turtle-dove - a species of dove common in Palestine. Compare the notes at Psalm 11:1. These doves, it is said, are never tamed. “Confined in a cage, they droop, and, like Cowper, sigh for ‹A lodge in some vast wilderness - some boundless contiguity of shade;‘ and no sooner are they set at liberty, than they flee to their mountains.” Land and the Book (Dr. Thomson), vol. i., p. 416.

For then would I fly away, and be at rest - I would escape from these dangers, and be in a place of safety. How often do we feel this in times of trouble! How often do we wish that we could get beyond the reach of enemies; of sorrows; of afflictions! How often do we sigh to be in a place where we might be assured that we should be safe from all annoyances; from all trouble! There is such a place, but not on earth. David might have borne his severest troubles with him if he could have fled - for those troubles are in the heart, and a mere change of place does not affect them; or he might have found new troubles in the place that seemed to him to be a place of peace and of rest. But there is a world which trouble never enters. That world is heaven; to that world we shall soon go, if we are God‘s children; and there we shall find absolute and eternal rest. Without “the wings of a dove,” we shall soon fly away and be at rest. None of the troubles of earth will accompany us there; no new troubles will spring up there to disturb our peace.


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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Psalms 55:6". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/psalms-55.html. 1870.

Coffman's Commentaries on the Bible

DAVID'S YEARNING TO GET AWAY FROM IT ALL

"And I said, O that I had wings like a dove!

Then would I fly away and be at rest.

Lo, then would I wander far off,

I would lodge in the wilderness. (Selah)

I would haste me to a shelter

From the stormy wind and tempest."

Who is there who never experienced such a yearning as this? Just to say "good-bye" to all the problems, just to walk out of the mess and never return - attractive as such thoughts may seem to be, God's servants must stand up to life like it is. David's Great Son, the Saviour, knelt in blood and tears in Gethsemane; and here the Old Testament type of our Lord could find no other honorable course of action except that outlined in this Psalm; but it definitely did not include anything like his "disappearance into some shelter in the wilderness." Oh no, tens of thousands would be slain, and there would be an agony that no tears could assuage.

"From the stormy wind and tempest" (Psalms 55:8). It was not a thunderstorm that threatened David, it was a rebellion! These words are a, "Poetic description of violence and strife, mentioned in the next verse."[9]


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James Burton Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.

Bibliography
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Psalms 55:6". "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/psalms-55.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And I said, oh that I had wings like a dove,.... The psalmist pitches upon this creature, partly to suggest that his enemies pursuing him were like the ravenous hawk, and he like the harmless, innocent, and trembling dove; and partly because of its swiftness in flying. Aben Ezra thinks the dove is mentioned, because it is sociable with men, and who send letters by them for quick dispatch, of which instances may be givenF18Vid. Aelian. Var. Hist. l. 9. c. 2. . This wish is expressed suitably to his character and case. The church is sometimes compared to a dove for its innocence, modesty, chastity, purity, affection, inconsolableness for the loss of its mate, and for its fearfulness, Song of Solomon 2:14; and so is Christ, Song of Solomon 5:12; who was typified by Jonah, whose name signifies a dove; and on whom the Spirit of God descended as a dove, at his baptism, and by whom he was filled with his dovelike graces;

for then would I fly away; so David desired to flee, and did flee with good speed and haste from Absalom his son, 2 Samuel 15:14, title. Arama observes of the dove, that, when weary with flying with one wing, it rests that, and flies with the other, and so has strength to fly continually without stopping, which he supposes to be the reason why the wing of a dove is desired. So every sensible sinner desires to flee from sin and sinners, and from wrath to come; from avenging justice, to Christ the city of refuge; so Christ, under the terrors of death, in his human nature, in a view of the law's curse and wrath, desired the cup might pass from him, and he might flee and escape death, though with submission to the divine will;

and be at rest; safe and secure from the conspirators, as David was; and as a sinner is that has fled to Christ; in whom is rest from the burden and guilt of sin, from the wrath, curse, and condemnation of the law, and under all afflictions, whether of body or mind; and not in the world, and worldly enjoyments; nor in the law, and the works of it: and as Christ is; not by escaping death, but through dying, and having done his work has ceased from it, and is entered into his rest; which was the joy set before him, that animated him as man to endure the cross, and despise the shame; here also true believers, weary of the world, desire to be, enjoying that rest which remains for the people of God.


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Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Psalms 55:6". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/psalms-55.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

And I said, Oh that I had wings like a dove! [for then] would I e fly away, and be at rest.

(e) Fear had driven him to so great distress, that he wished to be hid in some wilderness, and to be banished from that kingdom which God had promised that he should enjoy.

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Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Psalms 55:6". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/psalms-55.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

be at rest — literally, “dwell,” that is, permanently.


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This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Psalms 55:6". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/psalms-55.html. 1871-8.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

6And I said, Who will give me wings like a dove? (300) These words mean more than merely that he could find no mode of escape. They are meant to express the deplorableness of his situation, which made exile a blessing to be coveted, and this not the common exile of mankind, but such as that of the dove when it flies far off to some deserted hiding-place. They imply that he could only escape by a miracle. They intimate that even the privilege of retreat by common banishment was denied him, so that it fared worse with him than with the poor bird of heaven, which can at least fly from its pursuer. Some think that the dove is singled out on account of its swiftness. The Jews held the ridiculous idea that the Hebrew reads wing in the singular number, because doves use but one wing in flying; whereas nothing is more common in Scripture than such a change of number. It seems most probable that David meant by this comparison, that he longed to escape from his cruel enemies, as the timid and defenseless dove flies from the hawk. Great, indeed, must have been the straits to which he was reduced, when he could so far forget the promise made to him of the kingdom as, in the agitation of his spirits, to contemplate a disgraceful flight, and speak of being content to hide himself far from his native country, and the haunts of human society, in some solitude of the wilderness. Nay, he adds, as if by way of concession to the fury of his adversaries, that he was willing (would they grant it) to wander far off, that he was not proposing terms of truce to them which he never meant to fulfill, merely to gain time, as those will do who entertain some secret and distant hope of deliverance. We may surely say that these are the words of a man driven to the borders of desperation. Such was the extremity in which he stood, that though prepared to abandon all, he could not obtain life even upon that condition. In such circumstances, in the anguish of this anxiety, we must not wonder that his heart was overwhelmed with the sorrows of death. The Hebrew word סועה, soah, which I have rendered raised, is by some translated tempestuous; and there can be no doubt that the Psalmist means a stormy wind raised by a whirlwind. When he says that this wind is raised by the whirlwind, (301) by this circumlocution he means a violent wind, such as compels the traveler to fly and seek shelter in the nearest dwelling or covert.

">“So, when the falcon wings her way above,
To the cleft cavern speeds the gentle dove,
Not fated yet to die.” — Popes Homer.

Sophocles, in a passage somewhat similar to this of the Psalmist, says, “O that with the rapid whirlwind flight of a dove I could cleave the etherial clouds!” — (Œdip Colon 1136.) “Kimshi gives it as the reason why the Psalmist prefers the dove to other birds, that while they become weary with flying, and alight upon a rock or a tree to recruit their strength, and are taken; the dove, when she is fatigued, alternately rests one wing, and flies with the other, and, by this means, escapes from the swiftest pursuers.” — (Paxton s Illustrations of Scripture, volume 2, p. 292.) It is worthy of observation, and it serves to heighten the effect of the Psalmist’s comparison, that יונה, yonah, the Hebrew name of the dove, is derived from ינה, yanah, he hath oppressed by force or fraud, and seems to have been applied to it from the circumstance of its being particularly defenseless, and exposed to rapine and violence. —Buxtorf s Lexicon


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Calvin, John. "Commentary on Psalms 55:6". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/psalms-55.html. 1840-57.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Psalms 55:6 And I said, Oh that I had wings like a dove! [for then] would I fly away, and be at rest.

Ver. 6. And I said, Oh that I had wings like a dove!] Ut citissime et longissime fugerem, that I might swiftly fly far off from Absalom’s pursuers; as the dove saveth herself by fight, and not by fight, scoureth away to the rocks and deserts, Jeremiah 48:28. Many souls are swifter of flight than doves; but these hold out better. R. Jonah saith, that whereas other birds, when they are wearied with flying, do rest them upon rocks or trees, and are taken; the dove doth not so, but letteth down one wing, and flieth with the other, and thereby escapeth the pursuer (R. Jonah, apud Kimchi).

For then would I fly away] But whither he saith not, because he knew not. The Church in the Revelation fled into the wilderness, Revelation 12:6 God provided a Pella for those primitive Christians. Luther, being asked where he would be at quiet from his enemies? answered, Sub coelo, under heave, somewhere God would secure him.


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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Psalms 55:6". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/psalms-55.html. 1865-1868.

Sermon Bible Commentary

Psalms 55:6

I. Don't spend your time in wishing for wings, or for anything else that is impossible. Not that there is anything wrong in a wish, unless we wish for what is wrong. Wishes will come flying into our minds, as little birds sometimes hop in at an open window. But do not pet, and feed, and fondle them. Let them fly away again. Wishing is profitless work, even for possible things.

II. God gave David something much better than wings. Read vers. 16, 17, 22, of Psalm lv., and look at the last six words of ver. 23, and you will see how this was. Often God denies our wishes that He may give us something better than we ask or think. The Lord Jesus needed no wings to fly up to heaven. And we need no wings to get near enough to Him to talk to Him. Ask Him to help you to use your hands and feet in His service. Love to Him will be better than the winged shoes you read of in the old Greek fables. It will make your feet swift and your hands nimble for every duty and every kindness.

E. R. Conder, Drops and Rocks, p. 120.


References: Psalms 55:6.—Homiletic Magazine, vol. xi., p. 12; W. Wilkinson, Thursday Penny Pulpit, p. 1 vol. iii., p. 301; G. Dawson, Sermons on Daily Lifeand Duty.


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Nicoll, William R. "Commentary on Psalms 55:6". "Sermon Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/sbc/psalms-55.html.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Psalms 55:6. And I said, Oh that I had wings! &c.— In the Hebrew, Who will give me wings like a dove? The dove is remarkable for the swiftness of its flight; and therefore the Psalmist, who saw himself in the extremest danger, and knew that his very life depended on his immediate escape, wishes for the swift wings of a dove, that he might with the utmost speed fly from the destruction which threatened him. Several writers have taken notice of a fine passage in Seneca's Octavia, ver. 915, &c. similar to this.

Quis mea digne deflere potest Mala? quae lacrimis nostris questus Reddet Aedon? Cujus pennas Utinam miserae mihi fata darent! Fugerem luctus ablata meos Penna volucri, procul et coetus Hominum tristes, coedemque feram Sola in vacuo nemore, et tenui Ramo pendens, querulo possem Gutture moestum fundere murmur.*

* Who can find terms suitable to the lamentation of my evil state? Not even Aedon† can do justice by her plaint to the tears that I shed! whose wings, indeed, I fain would wear, if the destinies were pleased to grant them. Borne on rapid pinions, I would leave my mourning mates, and avoid the cruel society and persecution of men. Then, sitting solitarily in a grove, perched upon a bending twig, with plaintive throat, I might pour my heavy murmuring notes around.

The daughter of Pandarus; and wife of king Zethus, who envying Niobe, the wife of Amphion, (her husband's brother.) because she had more children than herself, resolved to murder the eldest, who was educated with her own son Itylus; by mistake she killed Itylus, and is fabled as having been changed into a nightingale, that she might sing her child's dirge.


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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Psalms 55:6". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/psalms-55.html. 1801-1803.

Charles Simeon's Horae Homileticae

DISCOURSE: 594

THE AFFLICTED SOUL COMFORTED

Psalms 55:6. And I said, O that I had wings like a dove! for then would I fly away, and be at rest.

TROUBLE is the portion of all, without exception; of the rich, as well as of the poor; of the godly, as well as of the ungodly: “man is born to it, as the sparks fly upward.” The godly indeed have, in some respects, a larger measure of it than others: for, from within, they have grounds of trouble which are unknown to others; and, from without, they are beset on every side with enemies, who hate them purely for their righteousness’ sake. Amongst all the saints of whom we read in Scripture, David seems to have been peculiarly distinguished as “a man of sorrows and acquainted with grief.” In the early part of his life, his persecutions from Saul kept him in continual jeopardy of his life: and during all his latter years, his own children furnished him with occasions of sorrow, which at times sunk him into the deepest distress, and rendered him weary even of life. The psalm before us was written on one of these occasions; we suppose at the time of Absalom’s rebellion. And so greatly was he oppressed in spirit, that he would gladly have fled to the ends of the earth, with the loss of all his honours and dignities, if he could but have obtained rest from his accumulated and overwhelming afflictions: he said, “O that I had wings like a dove! for then would I fly away, and be at rest.”

This being by no means an uncommon sentiment, I will shew,

I. What are the occasions which usually give rise to this wish—

The wish itself necessarily presupposes a state of trouble; and it may arise in the bosom,

1. From temporal troubles—

[Afflictions do not lose their nature when they visit the godly. Piety may soften their pungency; but it does not divest them of their proper qualities: “they are not joyous to any, but grievous;” as God has condescended to declare. How grievous David’s trial was, may be seen in all the preceding context: “Give ear to my prayer, O God; and hide not thyself from my supplication. Attend unto me, and hear me! I mourn in my complaint and make a noise: my heart is sore pained within me; and the terrors of death are fallen upon me. Fear-fulness and trembling are come upon me, and horror hath overwhelmed me.” Nor do we wonder at this language, when we consider that his own son had driven him from his throne; that many of his subjects were in rebellion against him; and that there was about to be a conflict between two portions of them, the one headed by himself, and the other led on by his son; and that, whichever might be victorious, it must be the blood of his subjects only that must flow. Well might he wish to withdraw from such a distressing scene, and well might he express himself in those mournful terms, “O that I had wings like a dove! for then would I fly away, and be at rest. Lo, then would I wander far off, and remain in the wilderness. I would hasten my escape from the stormy wind and tempest.” And though such scenes are rare, it is by no means uncommon to find in families troubles of such an overwhelming nature, as to make life itself a burthen to those who are afflicted by them. Husbands and wives, parents and children, who ought to be sources of the sublimest happiness to each other, are not unfrequently occasions to each other of the deepest woe; a woe that embitters their whole lives, and makes them pant for death as a relief. And where there is no particular evil committed either by the head or members, there will often arise, from the dispensations of Providence, such afflictions as prove an insupportable burthen to the mind. In Job, for instance, we see, from his accumulated trials, the same effect produced as from the afflictions of David. He wished that in his early infancy he had been consigned to the grave, “where the wicked cease from troubling, and where the weary are at rest.” “Wherefore,” says he, “is light given to him that is in misery, and life unto the bitter in soul; who long for death, but it cometh not; and dig for it more than for hid treasures? There the prisoners rest together; they hear not the voice of the oppressor. The small and great are there; and the servant is free from his master [Note: Job 3:17-21.].” In truth, almost all the suicides of which we hear originate in worldly sorrow, either personal or domestic: nor is it always found that piety itself is sufficient to counterbalance the effects of temporal calamity; so as to elevate the spirits which have been broken by it, and restore the constitution that has been destroyed.]

2. From spiritual troubles—

[Of these, none can judge, but those who have endured them. In reference to these it may well be said, “The spirit of man may sustain his infirmities; but a wounded spirit who can bear [Note: Proverbs 18:14.]” Truly, when a man is bowed down under a sense of sin, and trembling under apprehensions of God’s wrath, he may well be dejected, and wish for any thing which may pacify his fears and terminate his sorrows. Great as Job’s other troubles were, this was heavier than them all. Hear his complaint under it: “O that my grief were thoroughly weighed, and my calamity laid in the balances together! for now it would be heavier than the sand of the sea: therefore my words are swallowed up. For the arrows of the Almighty are within me, the poison whereof drinketh up my spirit: the terrors of God do set themselves in array against me. O that I might have my request! that God would grant me the thing that I long for, even that it would please God to destroy me [Note: Job 6:2-4; Job 6:8-9,] Terrible, beyond measure, are the hidings of God’s face under such circumstances: so at least David felt them to be: “Thou hast laid me in the lowest pit, in darkness, in the deeps: thy wrath lieth hard upon me, and thou hast afflicted me with all thy waves. Lord, why castest thou off my soul? why hidest thou thy face from me? I am afflicted and ready to die from my youth up: while I suffer thy terrors, I am distracted [Note: Psalms 88:7-8; Psalms 88:14-15.].” So it is with some at this time: they go mourning all the day long; and by their anticipations of God’s wrath, feel almost the commencement of it in their souls. The Saviour himself deprecated this bitter cup, and complained of the hidings of God’s face in his extremity: well, therefore, may frail men. who are crushed before the moth, implore “the staying of God’s rough wind in the day of his east wind. [Note: Isaiah 27:8.]”]

Seeing, then, that the wish of David is common in the world, let us inquire,

II. How far the godly are at liberty to indulge it—

Certainly we are at liberty to wish for death: for St. Paul “desired to depart, and to be with Christ,” which he deemed far better than the happiest state on earth: and we all are encouraged to be “looking for, and hasting unto, the coming of the day of Christ.” But the wish then becomes evil, when it is attended with impatience, or has respect to a mere deliverance from present troubles. This distinction is clearly marked by St. Paul, in the Second Epistle to the Corinthians: “We that are in this tabernacle do groan, being burthened; not that we would be unclothed, but clothed upon, that mortality may be swallowed up of life [Note: 2 Corinthians 5:4.].” It was not so much to get rid of the storms and tempests to which he was exposed in this present life, as to obtain the glory and felicity of a better world. And this was a highly commendable state of mind. But when we long merely to be released from the troubles of life, and the conflicts which we are here called to sustain, we do not well: for we should be content,

1. That God should glorify himself in his own way—

[God sends trials to his people, in order that he may afford them such effectual succour as shall advance his glory in the world. The trial of gold by fire is precious, because it purifies without consuming the gold: but “the trial of our faith is infinitely more precious,” because it purifies the souls of men: and it will, therefore, “be to the praise and honour and glory of our God, in the great day of his appearing [Note: 1 Peter 1:7.].” On the part of those who occasion trials to his people he is dishonoured: “but in the steadfastness of his people he is glorified [Note: 1 Peter 4:14.].” Even in the sufferings of our blessed Lord this end was obtained; and therefore, though he deprecated sufferings as he was entitled to do, he submitted to bear his cross for the sake of reflecting glory on his heavenly Father: “Now is my soul troubled; and what shall I say? Father, save me from this hour? but for this cause came I unto this hour. Father, glorify thy name [Note: John 12:27-28.].” Thus, if only in the event God may be glorified in us, we should be willing to bear any sufferings, or sustain any conflicts, which God, in his wisdom, may see fit to lay upon us.]

2. That he should complete his work in his own way—

[He calls all his people to bear their cross, in imitation, of their Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ, Now “the Lord Jesus, though he was a Son, vet learned obedience by the things which he suffered:” and “he was made perfect through sufferings;” and in the same war does God still teach and perfect us. He makes tribulation the way to glory; purging us from our corruptions by means of it [Note: Isaiah 27:9. Hebrews 12:10.], and causing it to “work out for us a far more exceeding and eternal weight of glory [Note: 2 Corinthians 4:17.].” Does it become us, then, to be impatient under our troubles; or to wish for the removal of them, before they have accomplished the end for which they were sent? Surely we should be infinitely more anxious to have them sanctified, than to get them removed; and, however sorely they may press upon us, we should say, “Not my will, but thine be done.” Be the furnace never so hot, we should welcome it, if only at last we may come out of it “vessels of honour, meet for the Blaster’s use.”]

Address—

1. Those who have hitherto been exempt from heavy trials—

[Doubtless, as far as the mere exemption from trouble goes, you have reason to be thankful: but yet. if for want of it you are yet in a careless or lukewarm state, you have no great reason to congratulate yourselves: it were better that every bone in your body were broken, or that you should have the sword of the Almighty inflicting the deepest wounds in your souls, than that you should be left to go on wickedly in the way of your hearts, I say not that you should pray for trials: for trials will do you no good, if they be not sanctified to your souls by the Spirit of God. But this I say, Let no rest satisfy you, except that which is to be found in the favour of a reconciled God, and in the hope of his glory — — —]

2. Those who are sinking under the weight of them—

[Peradventure some may be here, who, like David, are bowed down under the weight of domestic troubles, or under a dread of God’s heavy displeasure. And, if this be the case, let me tell you where you may find rest unto your souls, You need not the wings of a dove to fly away: you have your refuge close at hand, even Jesus, who says, “Come unto me, all ye that labour and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest.” If you will but run to Him, you shall find him “an hiding-place from the wind, and a covert from the tempest; as rivers of water in a dry place, as the shadow of a great rock in a weary land [Note: Isaiah 32:2.].” Yes, m truth, “He is a strength to the poor, a strength to the needy in his distress, a refuge from the storm, a shadow from the heat, when the blast of the terrible ones is as a storm against the wall [Note: Isaiah 25:4.].” Go to him then; take refuge in him; cast yourselves upon him; and let him give you rest, in his own time and way. Then will he walk with you in the furnace, as he did with the Hebrew youths; and in due season add you to the happy number of “those who have come out of great tribulation, and washed their robes white in the blood of the Lamb [Note: Revelation 7:14.].” Then will your rest be glorious indeed: for “then you will hunger no more, nor thirst any more; neither shall the sun rest on you, nor any heat. For the Lamb which is in the midst of the throne shall feed you, and shall lead you unto living fountains of waters: and God shall wipe away all tears from your eyes [Note: Revelation 7:16-17.].”]


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Bibliography
Simeon, Charles. "Commentary on Psalms 55:6". Charles Simeon's Horae Homileticae. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/shh/psalms-55.html. 1832.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

6. Wings like a dove—The “dove” is here alluded to, not only because it was strong and swift of wing, (Isaiah 60:8; Genesis 8:8-12,) in its wild state choosing its quiet abode in the clefts of the rocks, (Songs of Solomon Psalm 2:14; Jeremiah 48:28,) but for its proverbial purity, innocence and love, (Song of Solomon 5:2,) which made it a favourite bird in the Hebrew sacrifices. Genesis 15:9; Leviticus 1:14; Leviticus 5:7-11.

Be at rest—One word in the Hebrew, signifying to abide, to dwell. He would abide in that far-off place of quiet, composed and self-resigned.


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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Psalms 55:6". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/psalms-55.html. 1874-1909.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(6) Oh that I had.—Literally, who will give me?—The bird that was in the psalmist’s thought was doubtless the Rock Pigeon (Columba livia), which selects for its nesting the lofty cliffs and deep ravines far from the neighbourhood of man. (Comp. Song of Solomon 2:14, Note.)

Be at rest.—So the LXX. and Vulg., and the reading is consecrated by long use; but the parallelism seems to require the more literal dwell or abide.


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Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Psalms 55:6". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/psalms-55.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And I said, Oh that I had wings like a dove! for then would I fly away, and be at rest.
11:1; 139:9; Revelation 12:14

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Psalms 55:6". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/psalms-55.html.

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