corner graphic

Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Psalms 60:11

 

 

O give us help against the adversary, For deliverance by man is in vain.

Adam Clarke Commentary

Give us help from trouble: for vain is the help of man - We have done all we can do, and have trusted too much in ourselves; now, Lord, undertake for us.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Psalms 60:11". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/psalms-60.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Give us help from trouble - From the troubles which have now come upon us and overwhelmed us.

For vain is the help of man - Margin, salvation. The idea is, that they would look in vain to man to assist them in their present difficulties. They must depend on God alone. What is here said of temporal troubles is true as absolutely in the matter of salvation. When we are burdened with the consciousness of guilt, and trembling under the apprehension of the wrath to come, it is not man that can aid us. Our help is in God alone. Man can neither guide, comfort, pardon, nor save; and in vain should we look to any man, or to all people, for aid. We must look to God alone: to God as the only one who can remove guilt from the soul; who can give peace to the troubled heart; who can deliver us - from condemnation and ruin.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Psalms 60:11". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/psalms-60.html. 1870.

The Biblical Illustrator

Psalms 60:11

Give us help from trouble: for vain is the help of man.

Help in God in all times of trouble

If a man had a long and perilous journey to take, in which he would be exposed to many difficulties and great dangers, would he not most thankfully receive from any one the kind offer of direction and assistance, that he might perform it with success and security? The life of man is such a journey, during which he is exposed to many difficulties and dangers.

I. In the world we must expect tribulation. As fallen creatures, we are constantly liable to infirmities, affliction, and disappointment.

II. Vain is the help of man. Man may not have the ability nor the inclination to help us in our worldly troubles. Man may not feel for our misery, nor be disposed to aid us in our distress. He may promise us his assistance, and yes desert us “in the very time of need.” “Vain is the help of man.” Man may endeavour to help; but it is so feeble, as to be of no real service. God, and God alone, can remove the burden, or support us under it.

III. How is this help to be obtained? By humble, fervent, and believing prayer. “Give us help in trouble, for vain is the help of man.” It is freely bestowed in Christ Jesus to all that need it and seek it of God in humble and fervent prayer. (C. Davy.)

The common in human life

I. A common human condition. “Trouble.” He has, almost from birth to death, to “walk in the midst of trouble”--troubles personal and social, material and spiritual--troubles of body, troubles of intellect, troubles of conscience.

1. Those that are spiritually pernicious--tending only to intensify the rebellion of the soul, harden the conscience, etc.

2. Those that are spiritually beneficent. To all regenerate and Christly men troubles are morally disciplinary (Hebrews 12:11).

II. A common human instinct. “Give us help from trouble.” Man in great trouble instinctively cries to the Supreme for help. Even irrational creatures seem to shriek for help in trouble. Tyndall says of the hare, when the greyhound is almost upon her, that she abandons hope through her own efforts, and screams convulsively into space for help. Man’s instinct is of a higher kind. The space into which he cries in trial is not empty. He sees a God in it. This instinct is as deep as the soul and as wide as humanity. It is developed by saint, by savage, and by sage.

1. This instinct implies a constitutional, an ineradicable belief in the existence, personality, accessibleness and entreatability of a God.

2. This instinct shows that prayer is not against the laws of nature, but one with it. As sure as the sun will rise, men will pray.

III. A common human experience. “Vain is the help of man.”

1. He cannot give an effective deliverance from trouble. That which makes anguish is the state of the soul--disordered affections, guilt of conscience, moral regrets, and dark forebodings. Unless these are removed the troubles remain.

2. He cannot give a permanent deliverance from trouble. Whatever alleviation he may afford to the sufferer, it can be only temporary. Let our prayer therefore be, “Give us help from trouble; for vain is the help of man.” (Homilist.)
.

Psalms 61:1-8


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "Psalms 60:11". The Biblical Illustrator. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/psalms-60.html. 1905-1909. New York.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Give us help from trouble,.... To have trouble is the common lot of all men, but especially of the people of God. They have some troubles which others have not, arising from indwelling sin, Satan's temptations, and the hidings of God's face; and as for outward troubles, they have generally the greatest share of them, which are certain to them by the appointment of God, and the legacy of Christ; though they are needful and for their good, and lie in their way to heaven. But perhaps here is particularly meant the time of trouble, which will be a little before the destruction of antichrist; which will be great, and none like it; will be the time of Jacob's trouble, though he shall be saved out of it, Jeremiah 30:7. This will be the time of the slaying of the witnesses, the hour of temptation, that will try the inhabitants of the Christian world; and when the saints, as they do in all their times of trouble, will seek to the Lord for help, in whom it is, and who has promised it, and gives it seasonably, and which is owing wholly to his own grace and goodness; and therefore it is asked that he would "give" it;

for vain is the help of man: or "the salvation of man"F23תשועת אדם "salus hominis", V. L. Pagninus, Montanus, &c. ; man himself is a vain thing; vanity itself, yea, lighter than vanity; even man at his best state, and the greatest among men; and therefore it is a vain thing to expect help and salvation from men, for indeed there is none in them; only in the Lord God is the salvation of his people, both temporal and spiritual.


Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Psalms 60:11". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/psalms-60.html. 1999.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

11Give us help from trouble: for vain is the help of man. Again he reverts to the exercise of prayer, or rather is led to it naturally by the very confidence of hope, which we have seen that he entertained. He expresses his conviction, that should God extend his help, it would be sufficient of itself, although no assistance should be received from any other quarter. Literally it reads, Give us help from trouble, and vain is the help of man “O God,” as if he had said, “when pleased to put forth thy might, thou needest none to help thee; and when, therefore, once assured of an interest in thy favor, there is no reason why we should desire the aid of man. All other resources of a worldly nature vanish before the brightness of thy power.” The copulative in the verse, however, has been generally resolved into the causal particle, and I have not scrupled to follow the common practice. It were well if the sentiment expressed were effectually engraven upon our hearts. Why is it almost universally the case with men that they are either staggered in their resolution, or buoy themselves up with confidences, vain, because not derived from God, but just because they have no apprehension of that salvation which he can extend, which is of itself sufficient, and without which, any earthly succor is entirely ineffectual? In contrasting the help of God with that of man, he employs language not strictly correct, for, in reality, there is no such thing as a power in man to deliver at all. But, in our ignorance, we conceive as if there were various kinds of help in the world, and he uses the word in accommodation to our false ideas. God, in accomplishing our preservation, may use the agency of man, but he reserves it to himself, as his peculiar prerogative, to deliver, and will not suffer them to rob him of his glory. The deliverance which comes to us in this manner through human agency must properly be ascribed to God. All that David meant to assert is, that such confidences as are not derived from God are worthless and vain. And to confirm this position, he declares in the last verse of the psalm, that as, on the one hand, we can do nothing without him, so, on the other, we can do all things by his help. Two things are implied in the expression, through God we shall do valiantly; (400) first, that if God withdraw his favor, any supposed strength which is in man will soon fail; and, on the other hand, that those whose sufficiency is derived from God only are armed with courage to overcome every difficulty. To show that it is no mere half credit which he gives God, he adds, in words which ascribe the whole work to him, that it is he who shall tread down our enemies Thus, even in our controversy with creatures like ourselves, we are not at liberty to share the honor of success with God; and must it not be accounted greater sacrilege still when men set free will in opposition to divine grace, and speak of their concurring equally with God in the matter of procuring eternal salvation? Those who arrogate the least fraction of strength to themselves apart from God, only ruin themselves through their own pride.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Psalms 60:11". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/psalms-60.html. 1840-57.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Psalms 60:11 Give us help from trouble: for vain [is] the help of man.

Ver. 11. Give us help from trouble] Give it us whensoever we need it; as hitherto thou very graciously hast done.

For vain is the help of man] As they had lately experimented in Saul, a king of their own choosing, but not able to save them from those proud Philistines. No more could the Romans the Britons, oppressed by their northern enemies. They sent Aetius, the Roman praefect of Gaul, and thus complained to him: The barbarous enemy beateth us to the sea, the sea beateth us back to the enemy; between these two kinds of deaths we are either murdered or drowned (Dan. Chron.). But their implorations prevailed not; for Aetius at that time had enough to do to keep his own head, and Valentinian, the empire. The saint’s comfort is, that where human help faileth Divine beginneth, as Philo told his countrymen, when rejected by Caius the emperor.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Psalms 60:11". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/psalms-60.html. 1865-1868.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Though I have some reputation for valour and conduct, and though my people are very numerous, and now united under me, yet all this will avail little or nothing without thy almighty help.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Psalms 60:11". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/psalms-60.html. 1685.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

help from trouble = succor out of trouble.

help of man = salvation or deliverance of man. Compare "save", Psalms 60:5.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Psalms 60:11". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/psalms-60.html. 1909-1922.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Give us help from trouble: for vain is the help of man.
Give
25:22; 130:8
vain
108:12; 124:1-3; 146:3; Isaiah 30:7; 31:3
help
Heb. salvation.
62:1

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Psalms 60:11". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/psalms-60.html.

To report dead links, typos, or html errors or suggestions about making these resources more useful use our convenient contact form
Powered by Lightspeed Technology