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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Psalms 60:12

 

 

Through God we shall do valiantly, And it is He who will tread down our adversaries.

Adam Clarke Commentary

Through God we shall do valiantly - Through thee alone shall we do valiantly; thou alone canst tread down our enemies; and to thee alone we look for conquest.

The author to whom Harmer refers in the note on the fourth verse, is one of the writers in a work entitled Gesta dei per Francos, fol. Hanoviae, 1611, 2 vols. And the places quoted by Harmer may be found in vol. i., p. 282; and as the passage is singular, and a good use has been made of it for the illustration of a difficult passage, I shall lay the words of the original before the reader: "Proxima ab hinc die sabbati clarescente, quidam Sarracenorum spe vitae in summitatem tecti domus praecelsae Solomonis ab armis elapsi, circiter trecenti, confugerant. Qui multa prece pro vita flagitantes, in mortis articulo positi, nullius fiducia aut promissione audebant descendere, quousque vexillum Tankradi in signum protectionis vivendi susceperunt. Sed minime misellis profuit. Nam plurimis super hoc indignantibus, et Christianis furore commotis, ne unus quidem illorum evasit."

It is very properly added by Albertus, that the noble spirit of Tancred was filled with indignation at this most horrible breach of faith; and he was about to take a summary revenge on the instigators and perpetrators of this unprincipled butchery, when the chiefs interposed, and not only maintained the expediency of the massacre that had already been committed, but the necessity of putting all the inhabitants to the sword. On this the savage fiends, called Christians, flew to arms, and made a universal slaughter of all that remained of the inhabitants. They drew out the prisoners, chopped off their heads, stabbed all they met with in the streets, and-but I can translate no farther; it is too horrible. I shall give my author's words, who was an ecclesiastic, and wrote down the account from eye-witnesses: "Concilio hoc accepto, (the determination of the chiefs to put all to the sword), tertio die post victoriam egressa est sententia a majoribus: et ecce universi arma rapiunt, et miserabili caede in omne vulgus Gentilium, quod adhuc erat residuum, exsurgunt, alios producentes e vinculis et decollantes: alios per vicos et plateas civitatis inventos trucidantes, quibus antea causa pecuniae, aut humana pietate pepercerunt. Puellas vero, mulieres, matronas nobiles, et faetas cum puellis tenellis detruncabant, aut lapidibus obruebant, in nullis aliquam considerantes aetatem. E contra, puellae, mulieres, matronae, metu momentaneae mortis angustiatae et horrore gravissimae necis concussae Christianos in jugulum utriusque sexus debacchantes ac saevientes, medios pro liberanda vita amplexabantur, quaedam pedibus eorum advolvebantur, de vita et salute sua illos nimium miserando fletu et ejulatu solicitantes. Pueri vero quinquennes aut triennes matrum patrumque crudelem casum intuentes, una miserum clamorem et fletum multiplicabant. Sed frustra haec pietatis et misericordiae signa fiebant: nam Christiani sic neci totum laxaverunt animum, ut non lugens masculus aut faemina, nedum infans unius anni vivens, manum percussoris evaderet. Unde plateae totius civitatis Jerusalem corporibus extinctis virorum et mulierum, lacerisque membris infantium, adeo stratae et opertae fuisse referuntur, ut non solum in vicis, soliis et palatiis, sed etiam in locis desertae solitudinis copia occisorum reperiretur innumerabilis.'GestA Dei Vol. I., p. 283.

This is one specimen of the spirit of the crusaders, and is it any wonder that God did not shine on such villanous measures! No wonder that the Mohammedans have so long hated the name of Christian, when they had no other specimen of Christianity than what the conduct of these ferocious brutes exhibited; and these were called Gesta Dei, the transactions of God!

There are many difficulties in this Psalm; whether they are in general removed by the preceding notes, the reader must judge. The following analysis is constructed on the supposition that the Psalm speaks of the distracted state of the kingdom from the fatal battle of Gilboa, in which Saul fell, to the death of Ishbosheth, when the whole kingdom was united under David.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Psalms 60:12". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/psalms-60.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Through God - By the help of God.

We shall do valiantly - literally, we shall make strength. That is, we shall gain or gather strength; we shall go forth with spirit and with courage to the war. This expresses the confident assurance that they would secure the aid of God, and that under him they would achieve the victory.

For he it is that shall tread down our enemies - He will himself tread or trample them down; that is, he will enable us to do it. The psalm, therefore, though begun in despondency and sadness, closes, as the Psalms often do, with confident hope; with the assurance of the favor of God; and with the firm belief that the object sought in the psalm would be obtained. The history shows that the prayer was answered; that the armies of David were successful; that Edom was subdued; and that thus the territories of the Hebrew people had, in fact, in the time of David, the boundaries promised to Abraham.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Psalms 60:12". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/psalms-60.html. 1870.

Coffman's Commentaries on the Bible

CONFIDENCE IN GOD

"Through God we shall do valiantly;

For he it is that will tread down our enemies."

These glorying words of confidence do not belong immediately after a complaint that God had deserted their armies and had cast Israel off. To us this is more than sufficient reason for returning to the KJV for Psalms 60:10.

"No miracle is expected. Let God look upon us favorably; let his light shine into our hearts; and `With God, we shall do valiantly.'"[12]

"He will tread down our enemies" (Psalms 60:12). Thus the psalm ends with a prophecy of total victory for Israel. This prophecy was indeed fulfilled, according to 2 Samuel 8:14; 1 Chronicles 18:13.


Copyright Statement
James Burton Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.

Bibliography
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Psalms 60:12". "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/psalms-60.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Through God we shall do valiantly,.... Or, "through the Word of the Lord", as the Targum; Christ, whose name is the Word of God, appearing at the head of his armies, in a vesture dipped in blood, and with a sharp sword proceeding out of his mouth, will inspire his people to fight valiantly under him; and who, in his name and strength, will get the victory over all their enemies, the beast, false prophets, and kings of the earth, and all under them; see Revelation 19:11;

for he it is that shall tread down our enemies; as mire in the street, or as grapes in a winepress; even kings, captains, mighty men, and all the antichristian nations and states; the beast, false prophet, and Satan himself, Revelation 19:15; and so there will be an end of all the enemies of Christ and his people; after which they will spend an endless eternity together, in joy, peace, and pleasure. The victory is wholly ascribed to God the Word; it is not they that shall do valiantly, that shall tread down their enemies; but he by whom they shall do valiantly shall do it; even the mighty הוא, "He", to whom was promised, in Eden's garden, the bruising the head of the serpent, and all enemies, Genesis 3:15; and who has the same name here as there.


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Psalms 60:12". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/psalms-60.html. 1999.

James Nisbet's Church Pulpit Commentary

‘GOD IS OUR REFUGE AND OUR STRENGTH’

‘Through God we shall do valiantly.’

Psalms 60:12

This is a national psalm to be taught to the people (Deuteronomy 31:19). As 44 was sung by the sons of Korah when the Edomites were taking advantage of David’s absence to invade the land, so this psalm was composed after victory had been assured. Shushaneduth means the lily of testimony, and may refer to the name of the tune to which this psalm was set. Aram is Syrians: the Syrians which dwelt between the two floods, Euphrates and Tigris, had become confederate with the Syrians of Zobah (2 Samuel 10:6; 2 Samuel 10:8; 2 Samuel 10:16; 2 Samuel 10:19). For the whole story, see 2 Samuel 8.

I. The first stanza tells of disaster.—Cast-off and broken-down, the land trembling and rent, the people learning hard lessons, and reeling in the weakness of drunken men. The measure to which it was set is said in the margin to mean ‘Lily of Testimony,’ whilst the object is described in the inscription, ‘Michtam of David to teach.’ It is good to hold up the mirror, to ascertain what and where we are. The time spent in diagnosing the disease is far from being lost. Let us learn what we are, that we magnify the grace that has raised us from our low estate, and made us to sit with princes.

II. But through it all God yearns over His beloved, and waits to save with His right hand.

III. No sooner is the prayer uttered than the answer is at hand.—God speaks in his holiness.

God is here described as the Holy One, separated from all created and finite beings, and therefore above all deceit and vacillation. He had promised to give His people the land which He promised to their forefathers, and David rejoices in the assurance that it must be so. Already he claims his inheritance to the full, and though it was not actually in his possession, he exults in the certainty that it is already his.

The recent invasion of the Edomites had opened the eyes of the chosen people, and especially of their king, to the high value of those ancient promises that had guaranteed to them the possession and enjoyment of the whole land: and the psalm proceeds to name several particular places, objects, and tribes, which really describe and cover their inheritance to its full extent. Shechem stands for the Western, and Succoth for the Eastern sides of the Jordan.

Illustration

‘The composition of the psalm has been placed correctly in the time before the battle in the valley of salt rather than afterwards, because it is necessary to suppose that the Edomites had fallen upon the land, laying it waste from the south when David had marched against his powerful enemies in the north and victoriously forced them back, but sent off his general Joab against the Edomites. To this laying waste the land, the lamentation which begins the psalm refers (2 Samuel 8:1-3). There is then a reference to Divine incitement (2 Samuel 8:4) which introduces the prayer for Divine help (2 Samuel 8:5), which passes over into the appropriation of a Divine oracle promising victory (2 Samuel 8:6-8). Upon this is based the renewed petition, intensified by its inconsistency with the present situation (2 Samuel 8:9-10) into pressing supplication for Divine assistance (2 Samuel 8:11-12).’


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Bibliography
Nisbet, James. "Commentary on Psalms 60:12". Church Pulpit Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cpc/psalms-60.html. 1876.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Psalms 60:12 Through God we shall do valiantly: for he [it is that] shall tread down our enemies.

Ver. 12. Through God we shall do valiantly] Faciemus militiam, some render it, and it is true of the spiritual warfare also; we shall be more than conquerors, even triumphers, 2 Corinthians 2:14. Meminisse oportet ista nunc esse ad spirituales Ecclesiae hastes potius quam adversus armatas terra capias referenda, saith Beza, in his argument and use of this psalm.

He it is that shall tread down our enemies] Corporal and spiritual; this is a part of Christ’s kingly office, to the which he will not be wanting. Psalmus hic est de Messia imperante, sicut David, saith Kimchi, out of Derash Rabboth. This psalm is concerning Messiah reigning, as David did.


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Psalms 60:12". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/psalms-60.html. 1865-1868.

Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary

REFLECTIONS

BLESSED Jesus! Wheresoever I turn mine eyes, throughout the whole volume of thy sacred word, how precious is it to my longing soul to behold thee set forth by the Holy Ghost, and glorified to my view. Lord, I pray thee, let this sweet Psalm be among the Michtams of my heart.

I will look to thee, O Lord, in all my afflictions. It is right, it is but just, that my God and Father should take displeasure at my wanderings. The land indeed may well tremble for the breaches sin hath made in our poor fallen nature. But look, Lord, I pray thee, to the Man at thy right hand, even to the Son of Man, whom thou hast made so strong for thine own self: look unto Jesus, who for his redeemed hath drunk the wine of astonishment, even until his precious soul cried out in the bitterness of it, My soul is exceeding sorrowful even unto death. Holy Father! was not thine Holy One thus exercised, and made sin for his people, that they might be made the righteousness of God in him? Oh! for grace to believe this, and everlastingly to live in the enjoyment of it.

Precious Jesus! thou hast gotten thyself the victory, and thine own arm hath brought salvation. Bring me then, Lord, under thy banner; bring me into thy banqueting house. Help me by precious faith to rejoice now, in the blessed prospect of that glory that shall be revealed. Yea, blessed Lord, let me see myself sitting by faith in heavenly places, in and with thyself. And enable me to exult, as thy servant did of his Gilead, and his Manasseh, and his Ephraim, of my Lord Jesus, and his kingdom, and his power, and his glory. Surely if I am Christ's, then am I Abraham's seed, and an heir according to the promise. Oh! let me hear thy voice day by day with this assurance, until thou shalt take me home to the everlasting enjoyment of my God and Christ forever.


Copyright Statement
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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Hawker, Robert, D.D. "Commentary on Psalms 60:12". "Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/pmc/psalms-60.html. 1828.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

12. Do valiantly—Be victorious. Notwithstanding the severe rebuff through the divine displeasure, their trust and help are alone in God, and this is the moral lesson of the psalm.

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Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Psalms 60:12". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/psalms-60.html. 1874-1909.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

PSALM LX. (EXAUDI DEUS.)

A prayer for the coming of the kingdom of Christ, which shall have no end.


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Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Psalms 60:12". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/psalms-60.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

To the chief Musician. See App-64.

upon = relating to.


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Psalms 60:12". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/psalms-60.html. 1909-1922.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Through God we shall do valiantly: for he it is that shall tread down our enemies.
we shall
18:32-42; 144:1; Numbers 24:18,19; Joshua 1:9; 14:12; 2 Samuel 10:12; 1 Chronicles 19:13
tread
44:5; Isaiah 10:6; 63:3; Zechariah 10:5; Malachi 4:3; Revelation 19:15

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Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Psalms 60:12". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/psalms-60.html.

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