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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Psalms 60:5

 

 

That Your beloved may be delivered, Save with Your right hand, and answer us!

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

That thy beloved may be delivered - The word beloved is in the plural number, and might be rendered beloved ones. It refers not merely to David as his servant and friend, but to those associated with him. The reference is to the calamities and dangers then existing, to which allusion has been made above. The prayer is, that the enemy might be driven back, and the land delivered from their invasion.

Save with thy right hand - The right hand is that by which the sword is handled, the spear hurled, the arrow drawn on the bow. The prayer is, that God would put forth his power and deliver his people.

And hear me - literally, Answer me. The answer which he desired was that God would lead his armies successfully into Edom, Psalm 60:8-9.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Psalms 60:5". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/psalms-60.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

That thy beloved may be delivered,.... Some think that these words express the effect or end of the banner being displayed; but because of the word "Selah" at the end of Psalm 60:4, which makes so full a stop; rather they are to be considered in construction with the following clause. By the Lord's "beloved" ones are meant, not so much the people of Israel, who were loved and chosen by the Lord above all people on the face of the earth, as the elect of God, both among Jews and Gentiles, who are the chosen of God, and precious, and are loved of him with a free, sovereign, everlasting, and unchangeable love: these are the beloved of Father, Son, and Spirit; who, falling into a state of condemnation and death in Adam, and being under the power of sin, and involved in the guilt and faith of it; and being fallen into the hands of many enemies, sin, Satan, and the world; stood in need of deliverance out of all this, which they could not work out of themselves, nor any creature for them; wherefore, that they might be delivered, the following request is made;

save with thy right hand; from sin, the cause of damnation; from the law, which threatens with condemnation and death; from Satan, that would devour and destroy; and from all their enemies; from wrath to come, from hell and the second death; or from going down to the pit of corruption. The persons for whom this petition is put up are not only David himself, but all the beloved ones; and these God has appointed unto salvation; Christ is the Saviour of them, and to them salvation is applied in due time by the Spirit, and in a little while they will be in the full possession of it: and this is wrought out by the "right hand" of the Lord; either by his mighty power, the saving strength of his right hand, who is mighty to save; or by his Son, the man of his right hand, made strong for himself, who able to save to the uttermost; and by whom God has determined to save, and does save all his people; or the words may be rendered, "save thy right hand, thy Benjamins"F16הושיעה ימינך. who are as near and dear to thee as thy right hand, being his mystical self, to whom salvation is brought by him, Isaiah 63:1;

and hear me; in so doing, he suggests he would hear and answer him his prayers would be ended and accomplished; this being the sum of them, his own salvation, and the salvation of the Lord's beloved ones. The "Cetib", or writing of this clause, is, "hear us"; the "Keri", or reading of it, "hear me".


Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Psalms 60:5". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/psalms-60.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

hear me — or, “hear us.”


Copyright Statement
These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Psalms 60:5". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/psalms-60.html. 1871-8.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

That thy beloved may be delivered; save with thy right hand, and hear me.

Beloved — Thy beloved people.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Psalms 60:5". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/psalms-60.html. 1765.

Scofield's Reference Notes

Psalms 60:5-12 are identical with Psalms 108:6-13.


Copyright Statement
These files are considered public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available in the Online Bible Software Library.

Bibliography
Scofield, C. I. "Scofield Reference Notes on Psalms 60:5". "Scofield Reference Notes (1917 Edition)". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/srn/psalms-60.html. 1917.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Psalms 60:5 That thy beloved may be delivered; save [with] thy right hand, and hear me.

Ver. 5. That thy beloved may be delivered] Heb. thy darlings, those that fear thee, Psalms 60:4, for, for their sakes it is that God doth good to a people; to all others he seemeth to say, as Elisha once did to Jehoram, that wicked king of Israel, What have I to do with thee? &c. Were it not that I regarded such and such people, I would not look toward thee, nor see thee, 2 Kings 3:13-14.

Save with thy right hand] Heb. Save thy right hand, which seemeth to be afflicted together with us; because the enemies say, he cannot save us; thus Kimchi expoundeth it.


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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Psalms 60:5". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/psalms-60.html. 1865-1868.

Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary

Jesus is the beloved of the Father, full of grace and truth. But it should seem that Christ had an eye in this prayer to the church which is his beloved, and in him also the beloved of the Father. Reader, if you take the verse in this sense, and then connect with it what the Lord Jesus Christ said in the days of his flesh, John 17:23. I do not know a thought which can be awakened in the mind more blessed, more delightful, and full of glory! Cherish it, I pray you, forever, and carry it about with you wherever you go, to help your mind on to the unceasing love and praise of all the persons of the Godhead. Doth God the Father indeed love the church of the Lord Jesus, even as he loveth him?


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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Hawker, Robert, D.D. "Commentary on Psalms 60:5". "Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/pmc/psalms-60.html. 1828.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Thy beloved people, last mentioned.


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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Psalms 60:5". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/psalms-60.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

5. Thy beloved—The same word, radically, as Jedediah, the beloved of Jehovah, a title of endearment given to Benjamin and to Solomon. Deuteronomy 33:12; 2 Samuel 12:25. See Psalms 108:6.

Right hand—As the emblem of most excellent strength, fidelity, and honour.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Psalms 60:5". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/psalms-60.html. 1874-1909.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

David now requested divine deliverance for the chosen people. God"s right hand represents His might. Psalm 60:5-12 are identical to Psalm 108:6-13.


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Bibliography
Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on Psalms 60:5". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/psalms-60.html. 2012.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Tabernacle. The words for ever seem to confine this to heaven, as the Fathers explain them, though they may also allude to a temporal protection (Berthier) in the temple. (Calmet) --- Wings. Chaldean, "of thy deity." Chaldean, I will continue a member of thy Church here, and be happy for ever. (Menochius)


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Psalms 60:5". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/psalms-60.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

hear = answer.

me. Hebrew text reads "us"; but some codices, with four early printed editions, Aramaean, Septuagint, Syriac, and Vulgate, read "me".


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Psalms 60:5". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/psalms-60.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

That thy beloved may be delivered; save with thy right hand, and hear me.

That thy beloved may be delivered, save with thy right hand - prayer for the completion of the deliverance already begun. God's grace, heretofore vouchsafed, ought not to slacken, but to quicken our prayers.

And hear me. So the Keri, or Hebrew margin, to accord with the following singulars "I ... I." But the Hebrew text, 'hear us.' The singulars following really denote plurality - i:e., the whole people. The original passage of "thy beloved" is Deuteronomy 33:12, "The beloved of the Lord," Benjamin, the representative of the whole people. "Save with thy right hand" perhaps refers to the meaning of Benjamin, "son of my right hand." Compare the name given by David to Solomon, "Jedidiah," beloved of Jah (2 Samuel 12:25).


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Psalms 60:5". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/psalms-60.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(5) From this verse onward the psalm appears again, with some variations noticed there, in Psalms 108:6-13.

(6, 7, 8) These three verses, forming the centre of the poem, are, plainly by their style, of different age and authorship from the beginning. Possibly, indeed, they formed an original poem by themselves, an ancient oracular saying descriptive of the relations of Israel to the tribes bordering on her territory, and were then employed by the compilers of this psalm and Psalms 108, to rouse the drooping spirits of the race in some less fortunate time. (See Introduction.) The speaker is God Himself, who, according to a familiar prophetic figure, appears in the character of a warrior, the captain of Israel, proclaiming the triumphs won through His might by their arms. (Comp. Isaiah 63:1-6.) Here, however, the picture is rather playful than terrible—rather ironic than majestic. The conqueror is returning, as in the passage of Isaiah referred to above, from the battle, but he is not painted “glorious in his apparel, travelling in the greatness of his strength.” The fury of the fight, the carnage, the bloodstained garments are all implied, not described. Instead of answering a challenge, as in Isaiah, by a description of the fight, here the champion simply proclaims the result of his victory as he proceeds to disarm and prepare for the bath—figures expressing the utmost contempt for the foe so easily subdued.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Psalms 60:5". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/psalms-60.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

That thy beloved may be delivered; save with thy right hand, and hear me.
That
12; 22:8; 108:6-13; Deuteronomy 7:7,8; 33:3; Matthew 3:17; 17:5
save
17:7; 18:35; 20:6; 74:11; Exodus 15:6; Isaiah 41:10

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Psalms 60:5". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/psalms-60.html.

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