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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Psalms 60:6

 

 

God has spoken in His holiness: "I will exult, I will portion out Shechem and measure out the valley of Succoth.

Adam Clarke Commentary

God hath spoken - Judah shall not only be re-established in Jerusalem, but shall possess Samaria, where Shechem is, and the country beyond Jordan, in which is situated the valley of Succoth. Dividing and meting out signify possession.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Psalms 60:6". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/psalms-60.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

God hath spoken in his holiness - That is, as a holy God; a God who is true; a God whose promises are always fulfilled. The idea is, that the holiness of God was the public pledge or assurance that what he had promised he would certainly perform. God had made promises in regard to the land of Canaan or Palestine, as a country to be put into the possession of Abraham and his posterity. Genesis 12:7; Genesis 13:15; Genesis 17:8; Psalm 105:8-11. The original promise of the gift of that land, made to Abraham under the general name of Canaan Genesis 12:7, embraced the whole territory from the river (that divided the land from Egypt) to the Euphrates: “Unto thy seed, addressed to Abraham, have I given this land, from the river of Egypt unto the great river, the river Euphrates,” Genesis 15:18. This would embrace the country of Edom, as well as the other countries which are specified in the psalm. The natural and proper boundary of the land on the east, therefore, according to the promise, was the river Euphrates; on the west, Egypt and the Mediterranean sea; on the south, the outer limit of Edom. It was the object of David to carry out what was implied in this promise, and to secure the possession of all that had been thus granted to the Hebrews as the descendants of Abraham. Hence, he had been engaged in carrying his conquests to the east, with a view to make the Euphrates the eastern border or boundary of the land: “David smote also Hadarezer, the son of Rehob, king of Zobah, as he went to recover his border at the river Euphrates,” 2 Samuel 8:3. Compare 1 Chronicles 18:3. In the prosecution of the same purpose he was anxious also to subdue Edom, that the entire territory thus promised to Abraham might be put in possession of the Hebrews, and that he might transmit the kingdom in the fullness of the original grant to his posterity. It is to this promise made to Abraham that he doubtless refers in the passage before us.

I will rejoice - I, David, will exult or rejoice in the prospect of success. I will find my happiness, or my confidence in what I now undertake, in the promise which God has made. The meaning is, that since God had made this promise, he would certainly triumph.

I will divide Shechem - That is, I will divide up the whole land according to the promise. The language here is taken from that which was employed when the country of Canaan was conquered by Joshua, and when it was divided among the tribes: “Be strong and of a good courage: for unto this people shalt thou divide for an inheritance the land which I sware unto their fathers to give them,” Joshua 1:6. Compare Joshua 13:6-7; Joshua 14:5; Joshua 18:10; Joshua 19:51; Joshua 23:4; Psalm 78:55; Acts 13:19. David here applies the same language to Shechem, “and the valley of Succoth,” as portions of the land, meaning that he would accomplish the original purpose in regard to the land by placing it in possession of the people of God. Shechem or Sichem was a city within the limits of the tribe of Ephraim, between Mount Ebal and Mount Gerizim, called by the Romans Neapolis, and now Nablus. It is about two hours, or eight miles, south of Samaria. It seems to be mentioned here as being the spot where the law of Moses was read to the people of Israel, and especially the blessings and curses recorded in Deuteronomy 27:11-13. This was actually done, Joshua 8:33. Shechem, therefore, as lying between these mountains, and as being the place where the great mass of the people were assembled to hear what was read, became a central place, a representative spot of the whole land, and to say that that was conquered or subdued, was to speak of that which implied a victory over the land. David speaks of having secured this, as significant of the fact that the central point of influence and power had been brought under subjection, and as in fact implying that the land was subdued. The importance of that place, and the allusion to it here, will justify a more extended reference to it, which I copy from “The Land and the Book,” by Dr. Thomson, vol. ii. p. 203,204.

“Nablus is a queer old place. The streets are narrow, and vaulted over; and in the winter time it is difficult to pass along many of them on account of brooks which rush over the pavement with deafening roar. In this respect, I know no city with which to compare it except Brusa; and, like that city, it has mulberry, orange, pomegranate, and other trees, mingled in with the houses, whose odoriferous flowers lead the air with delicious perfume during the months of April and May. Here the billbul delights to sit and sing, and thousands of other birds unite to swell the chorus. The inhabitants maintain that theirs is the most musical vale in Palestine, and my experience does not enable me to contradict them.

“Imagine that the lofty range of mountains running north and south was cleft open to its base by some tremendous convulsion of nature, at right angles to its own line of extension, and the broad fissure thus made is the vale of Nablus, as it appears to one coming up the plain of Mukhna from Jerusalem. Mount Ebal is on the north, Gerizim on the south, and the city between. Near the eastern end, the vale is not more than sixty rods wide; and just there, I suppose, the tribes assembled to hear the ‹blessings and the curses‘ read by the Levites. We have them in extenso in Joshua 13:27. It was on the east side of the river Jordan, and is now called Sakut. It is first mentioned in Genesis 33:17, in the account of the journey which Jacob took on returning from the East to the land of Canaan. At this place he paused in his journey, and made booths for his cattle; and hence, the name Succoth, or booths. Why this place is referred to here by David, as representing his conquests, cannot now be ascertained. It seems most probable that it was because it was a place east of the Jordan, as Shechem was west of the Jordan, and that the two might, therefore, represent the conquest of the whole country. Succoth, too, though not more prominent than many other places, and though in itself of no special importance, was well known as among the places mentioned in history. It is possible, also, though no such fact is mentioned, that there may have been some transaction of special importance there in connection with David‘s conquests in the East, which was well understood at the time, and which justified this special reference to it.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Psalms 60:6". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/psalms-60.html. 1870.

Coffman's Commentaries on the Bible

GOD'S PROMISES RECALLED IN PRAYER

"God hath spoken in his holiness: I will exult;

I will divide Shechem, and mete out the valley of Succoth.

Gilead is mine, and Manasseh is mine;

Ephraim also is the defense of my head;

Judah is my sceptre.

Moab is my washpot;

Upon Edom will I cast my shoe:

Philistia, shout thou because of me."

"God hath spoken ... I will exult" (Psalms 60:6). What this says is that, "I will exult in the promises God has made to Israel." The difficulty is that no specific promises recorded in the Old Testament say exactly what is here stated. Perhaps the accurate explanation is that given by Rawlinson: "This is a reference to the general aspect of the assurances given in the Pentateuch in regard to Israel's possession of the land of Canaan and to their victory over hostile neighbors."[9] God's assurances to Jacob and to Israel, especially through Moses, speak of their possession of Canaan and victory over all opposition. The argument here, then, is simply this: `If these assurances from the Holy Scriptures are to be depended upon, Israel cannot now be in actual danger of being subjugated by Edom.'

"Shechem ... and Succoth" (Psalms 60:6). This evidently refers to God's promise of giving Canaan to Israel. "Shechem" is a principal city west of Jordan, and "the Valley of Succoth" is a prominent sector of Canaan east of the Jordan.

"Gilead ... Manasseh ... Ephraim" (Psalms 60:7). "Gilead" was identified with the land east of the Jordan river, and Ephraim was a powerful tribe dominating the land west of the Jordan. "Manasseh" held lands on both sides of Jordan; and it seems from these proper names in these verses that the psalmist was stressing God's promise to give Israel all of Canaan.

Moreover the mention of Judah as "God's sceptre" was for the purpose of recalling the ancient word that "Jacob have I loved; and Esau (Edom) have I hated." (Judah was a son of Jacob). Such thoughts would indeed have been encouraging to Israel following a military set-back in which Edom had won a battle.

"Moab ... Edom ... Philistia" (Psalms 60:8). No such promises of God thus to deal with these nations can be found in the Old Testament.; and, therefore, we conclude that these words are a paraphrase of what the psalmist believed to be God's love of Israel and his opposition to these three nations mentioned.

Certainly, Moab, Edom, and Philistia were relegated by God Himself to a status below that of Israel, even though none of the prophets used exactly the same terminology that here describes it. What the psalmist says here is that, "God has willed these nations to be in a subordinate role, servile to God's people: Moab for bathing their feet, Edom the lackey to whom the sandals are thrown, and Philistia to provide the theme of a victory song!"[10]

One of the great lessons of this psalm is that the fact of recalling and repeating the sacred promises of God is a legitimate and effective device in prayer.


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James Burton Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.

Bibliography
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Psalms 60:6". "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/psalms-60.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

God hath spoken in his holiness,.... Or "in his holy place"F17בקדשו "in sanctuario suo", Tigurine version, Vatablus; "in sancto suo", V. L. Musculus, Cocceius. ; in heaven, the habitation of his holiness and of his glory; or "in the house of the sanctuary", as the Targum: in the tabernacle, in the holy place by Urim and Thummim; and in the most holy place by his sacred oracle, from between the mercy seat: or "by his Holy Ones", as the Arabic version; by his holy prophets, Samuel and Nathan, by whom he spoke to David concerning the kingdom; and by his Holy Spirit dictating this psalm, and the rest unto him; and by his Son, his Holy One, by whom he has spoken in these last times unto his people, to which this psalm has reference: or it may be understood of the perfection of his holiness in which he has spoken, and by which he has swore; not only to David literally, concerning the extent of his dominion, the perpetuity and stability of it; but to David's son and antitype, the Messiah, concerning his seed, possession, and inheritance, Psalm 89:19;

I will rejoice; at the holiness of the Lord, which is matter of joy to the saints, especially as the is displayed and glorified in salvation by Christ, Psalm 97:12; and at what he said in his holiness to David, concerning his temporal kingdom, and the duration of it; because he knew that what he said he would perform; and at what was spoken to him by the Messiah, in council and covenant, concerning his seeing his seed, and prolonging his days; which was the joy set before him, which carried him through his sorrows and sufferings, Hebrews 12:2; wherefore he believed his kingdom should be enlarged, both among Jews and Gentiles, as follows;

I will divide Shechem; a city in Mount Ephraim, Joshua 20:7; and so was in the hands of Ishbosheth the son of Saul; as the valley of Succoth, Gilead, Ephraim, and Manasseh, after mentioned, and all the tribes of Israel, were, but Judah, 2 Samuel 2:4; but, because of God's promise, David believed that they would be all in his possession; signified by dividing, as a land is divided for an inheritance when conquered, Joshua 13:7; or this is said in allusion to the dividing of spoils in a conquered place; and so the Targum,

"I will divide the prey with the children of Joseph, that dwell in Shechem;'

and as Shechem was the same with Sychar, near to which our Lord met with the Samaritan woman, and converted her, and many others of that place, then might he be said to divide the spoils there, John 4:5;

and mete out the valley of Succoth; with a measuring line, so taking possession of it, 2 Samuel 8:2; Succoth was near to Shechem, Genesis 33:17; and was in the tribe of Gad, and in a valley, Joshua 13:27; there was a Succoth in the plain of Jordan, 1 Kings 7:46; it signifies booths, tents, or tabernacles, and may mystically signify the churches of Christ, wherein he dwells and exercises his dominion.


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Psalms 60:6". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/psalms-60.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

God hath spoken in his g holiness; I will rejoice, I will divide Shechem, and mete out the valley of Succoth.

(g) It is as certain as if it were spoken by an oracle, that I will possess those places which Saul has left to his children.

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Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Psalms 60:6". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/psalms-60.html. 1599-1645.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

God hath spoken in his holiness; I will rejoice, I will divide Shechem, and mete out the valley of Succoth.

Rejoice — Therefore I will turn my prayers into praises, for what God has already done.

Divide — Which supposeth possession and dominion.

Shechem — A place within Jordan, in mount Ephraim.

Succoth — A place without Jordan. He mentions Shechem, and Succoth; for all the land of Canaan, within and without Jordan.


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Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Psalms 60:6". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/psalms-60.html. 1765.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

6.God hath spoken in his holiness; I will rejoice. Hitherto he has adverted to the proofs which had come under their own observation, and from which they might easily see that God had manifested his favor in a manner new, and for many years unprecedented. He had raised the nation from a state of deep distress to prosperity, and had changed the aspect of affairs so far, that one victory was following another in rapid succession. But now he calls their attention to a point of still greater importance, the divine promise — the fact that God had previously declared all this with his own mouth. However numerous and striking may be the practical demonstrations we receive of the favor of God, we can never recognize them, except in connection with his previously revealed promise. What follows, although spoken by David as of himself individually, may be considered as the language adopted by the people generally, of whom he was the political head. Accordingly, he enjoins them, provided they were not satisfied with the sensible proofs of divine favor, to reflect upon the oracle by which he had been made king in terms the most distinct and remarkable. (389) He says that God had spoken in his holiness, not by his Holy Spirit, as some, with an over-refinement of interpretation, have rendered it, nor by his holy place, the sanctuary; (390) for we read of no response having been given from it to the prophet Samuel. It is best to retain the term holiness, as he adverts to the fact of the truth of the oracle having been confirmed, and the constancy and efficacy of the promise having been placed beyond all doubt by numerous proof, of a practical kind. As no room had been left for question upon the point, he employs this epithet to put honor upon the words which had been spoken by Samuel. He immediately adds, that this word of God was the chief ground upon which he placed his trust. It might be true that he had gained many victories, and that these had tended to encourage his heart; but he intimates, that no testimony which he had received of this kind gave him so much satisfaction as the word. This accords with the general experience of the Lord’s people. Cheered, as they unquestionably are, by every expression of the divine goodness, still faith must ever be considered as holding the highest place — as being that which dissipates their worst sorrows, and quickens them even when dead to a happiness which is not of this world. Nor does David mean that he merely rejoiced himself. He includes, in general, all who feared the Lord in that Kingdom. And now he proceeds to give the sum of the oracle, which it is observable that he does in such a way as to show, in the very narration of it, how firmly he believed in its truth: for he speaks of it as something which admitted of no doubt whatsoever, and boasts that he would do what God had promised. I will divide Shechem, he says, and mete out the valley of Succoth (391) The parts which he names are those that were more late of coming into his possession, and which would appear to have been yet in the hands of Saul’s son, when this psalm was written. A severe struggle being necessary for their acquisition, he asserts that, though late of being subdued, they would certainly be brought under his subjection in due time, as God had condescended to engage this by his word. So with Gilead and Manasseh (392) As Ephraim was the most populous of all the tribes, he appropriately terms it the strength of his head, that is, of his dominions. (393) To procure the greater credit to the oracle, by showing that it derived a sanction from antiquity, he adds, that Judeah would be his lawgiver, or chief; which was equivalent to saying, that the posterity of Abraham could never prosper unless, in agreeableness to the prediction of the patriarch Jacob, they were brought under the government of Judah, or of one who was sprung from that tribe. He evidently alludes to what is narrated by Moses, (Genesis 49:10,) “The scepter shall not depart from Judah, nor a lawgiver from between his feet, until Shiloh come.” The same word is there used, מחוקק, Mechokek, or legislator. It followed, that no government could stand which was not resident in the tribe of Judah, this being the decree and the good pleasure of God. The words are more appropriate in the mouth of the people than of David; and, as already remarked, he does not speak in his own name, but in that of the Church at large.


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Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Psalms 60:6". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/psalms-60.html. 1840-57.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Psalms 60:6 God hath spoken in his holiness; I will rejoice, I will divide Shechem, and mete out the valley of Succoth.

Ver. 6. God hath spoken in his holiness] He hath assured me all these following places; therefore I looked upon them long since as already mine, and now I am master of them.

I will rejoice] As having peaceable possession of all; though I have come hardly by it. Now I see that whatsoever God by his servant Samuel assured me of, was true, and to be trusted; albeit I sometimes doubted of it, Psalms 116:11, 1 Samuel 27:1.

I will divide Shechem, and mete out the valley of Succoth] Which places, though they longest held out against me under Ishbosheth, yet now that they are come in, they shall have civil usage under me, and be better dealt with than those outland enemies, Moab, Edom, &c., now brought under my subjection.


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Psalms 60:6". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/psalms-60.html. 1865-1868.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

God hath spoken: having prayed that God would save and hear him, he now intimates that God had done it already, and had prevented his prayers, and had spoken to him and of him, about the stablishing of his throne.

In his holiness; or, in the sanctuary or holy place, to which David used to resort to ask counsel, and from whence God usually gave out his oracles. Or rather, by his holiness, as this very word is rendered, Psalms 89:35, which carries the form of an oath, and implies that God did not simply speak, but swore by his holiness as it is there expressed. I will rejoice; therefore I will turn my prayers into praises and rejoicings for what God had already done, and, as I am assured, will further do, on my behalf.

I will divide; or, distribute; which supposeth possession and dominion. Shechem; a place within Jordan, in Mount Ephraim. See Genesis 33:18 Joshua 20:7.

Succoth; a place without Jordan. See Genesis 33:17 Joshua 13:27. He mentions Shechem and Succoth, either synecdochically for all the land of Canaan within and without Jordan, which, having been formerly divided between him and Ishbosheth, was now entirely in his possession; or because these two places had been in Ishbosheth’s hands, and possibly were extraordinarily devoted to Saul’s house, and utterly averse from David; or for some other reason now unknown.


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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Psalms 60:6". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/psalms-60.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

6. God… spoken—Hitherto David has spoken, figuratively, of a “banner displayed on account of the truth;” now, he speaks plainly of the divine oracle as the ground of his faith. “God hath spoken;” an allusion to Jacob’s prophecy, Genesis 49:10; Samuel’s message, 1 Samuel 16:13; and to Nathan’s, 2 Samuel 7:4-17. Delitzsch says, it is possible, also, that at this moment “David received an oracle from the high priest by means of the Urim and Thummim which assured him of the unity of his kingdom and the sovereignty over the bordering nations.”

Shechem… Succoth—The former an open plain west of Jordan, and the latter a valley east of Jordan in the tribe of Gad, which has not been well identified by modern discovery, but was probably about the latitude of Shechem. These are alluded to as patriarchal stations when Jacob, on his return from “Padan Aram,” was searching a central location for the settlement of the Hebrew family, and are here used poetically for the total promised territory east and west of Jordan. Compare Genesis 33:17-18; Joshua 13:27; Judges 8:4-5. The dividing and meting out simply indicate absolute title and sovereignty. Numbers 26:55-56; 2 Samuel 8:2


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Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Psalms 60:6". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/psalms-60.html. 1874-1909.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

David quoted a prophecy that he had received assuring Israel"s military success. God had said He would give Shechem and the valley of Succoth to Israel. Shechem is the site west of the Jordan where God first promised Canaan to Abraham and his descendants ( Genesis 12). It was also where Jacob lived after he returned to Canaan from Paddan-aram and Laban"s oppression ( Genesis 33:18-20). Succoth was the place east of the Jordan where Jacob settled after God delivered him from Esau, when Jacob returned from Paddan-aram ( Genesis 33:17). Both places had associations with past victories over Arameans and the fulfillment of God"s promises concerning the land. Used together, these places represent victory on both sides of the Jordan.


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Bibliography
Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on Psalms 60:6". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/psalms-60.html. 2012.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

Psalms 60:6. God hath spoken, &c. — Having prayed that God would hear and save him, he now intimates that God had done it already, had prevented his prayers, and had spoken to him, and of him, about the establishing of his throne; in his holiness — Or, rather, by his holiness, as this very expression, בקדשׁו, bekodsho, is rendered, Psalms 89:35. Which carries the form of an oath, and implies, that God did not simply speak, but swore by his holiness, as is there expressed. I will rejoice — Therefore I will turn my prayers into praises, for what God has already done; and, as I am assured, will further do on my behalf. I will divide Shechem — Namely, as a portion or inheritance, as אחלקה, achallekah, properly signifies. I will exercise dominion over, and distribute it to be possessed as I see good. Shechem was a place within Jordan in mount Ephraim. And mete out the valley of Succoth — A place without Jordan. He mentions Shechem and Succoth for all the land of Canaan within and without Jordan, which, having been formerly divided between him and Ish-bosheth, was now entirely in his possession. Some, however, think that the expression is proverbial, and only means, I will divide the spoils of my enemies with as much ease as the sons of Jacob portioned out Shechem, and measured out for their tents the valley of Succoth.


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Bibliography
Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on Psalms 60:6". Joseph Benson's Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/psalms-60.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Inheritance. David had both a temporal, and an eternal one in view. (Berthier) --- The captives express their gratitude for their deliverance. (Calmet)


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Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Psalms 60:6". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/psalms-60.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

hath spoken. Verses 6-9 refer to the promise of the possession of the whole of Canaan, confirmed in 2 Samuel 7:10. David here encourages himself by it.

Shechem . . . Succoth. West and east of Jordan.


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Psalms 60:6". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/psalms-60.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

God hath spoken in his holiness; I will rejoice, I will divide Shechem, and mete out the valley of Succoth.

God hath spoken in his holiness - alluding to God's promise that His people should possess Canaan (Genesis 49:1-33; Deuteronomy 33:1), and vanquish their foes (Numbers 24:17-19). So the title, 'the lily of the testimony' (Shushan-eduth), refers to God's lovely promises to Israel in the law. "In His holiness" means 'in His character as the Holy One,' infinitely raised above deceit or change (Psalms 89:35; Numbers 23:19).

I will rejoice - at His sure promises. The people personified speaks: so in Psalms 60:10; Psalms 60:12, the plural follows: us

... our.

I will divide Shechem, and mete out the valley of Succoth - i:e., the whole of Canaan, alike the region east of Jordan, represented by Succoth, as also that west of Jordan, represented by Sechem, is my inalienable possession according to God's assignation. Therefore the Edomite invaders cannot oust me from it. Jacob's successive settlement at Succoth and Shechem, on his return from the same Mesopotamia whence the Israelite host was now returned, typified this occupancy of the whole land by his posterity (Genesis 33:17-18). On the reference to the division of the land in the word "I will divide," cf. Joshua 13:7; Joshua 18:8.


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Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Psalms 60:6". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/psalms-60.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(6) In his holiness . . .—The LXX. and Vulg. have “in his sanctuary” which suits the utterance of an oracle.

I will rejoice . . .—Rather, I will raise a shout of triumph.

I will divide Shechem . . .—Rather, I may divide, &c, implying unquestioned right of ownership. Shechem and Succoth appear to be named as a rude indication of the whole breadth of the country, from west to east. The fact that Dr. Robinson and Vandervelde have identified one Succoth on the right bank of Jordan, does not at all weaken the evidence for the existence of another on the east of that river. See Genesis 33:17; Judges 8:5 seq.; Joshua 13:17 (where çmek is used for valley, as here).


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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Psalms 60:6". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/psalms-60.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

God hath spoken in his holiness; I will rejoice, I will divide Shechem, and mete out the valley of Succoth.
God
89:19,35; 108:7-13; 132:11; 2 Samuel 3:18; 5:2; Jeremiah 23:9; Amos 4:2
rejoice
56:4; 119:162; 2 Samuel 7:18-20; Luke 1:45-47
divide
Joshua 1:6; 2 Samuel 2:8,9; 5:1-3
Shechem
Genesis 12:6
Sichem
Joshua 20:7; 24:1,32
valley
Joshua 13:27

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Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Psalms 60:6". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/psalms-60.html.

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