corner graphic

Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Psalms 60:8

 

 

"Moab is My washbowl; Over Edom I shall throw My shoe; Shout loud, O Philistia, because of Me!"

Adam Clarke Commentary

Moab is my washpot - The Moabites shall be reduced to the meanest slavery.

Over Edom will I cast out my shoe - I will make a complete conquest of Idumea, and subject the Edomites to the meanest offices, as well as the Moabites.

Philistia, triumph thou because of me - John Hyrcanus subdued the Idumeans, and caused them to receive circumcision, and profess the Jewish religion. The words here seem to predict their entire subjugation.

In an essay for a new translation of the Bible, there is what appears to me a correct paraphrase of the seventh and eighth verses: "Gilead and Manasseh have submitted unto me; Ephraim furnishes me with valiant men, and Judah with men of prudence and wisdom. I will reduce the Moabites to servitude; I will triumph over the Edomites, and make them my slaves; and the Philistines shall add to my triumph."


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Psalms 60:8". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/psalms-60.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Moab is my washpot - Moab was a region of country on the east of the Dead Sea, extending as far north as the river Arnon. See the notes at Isaiah 15:1-9. The words rendered wash-pot mean properly a pot or basin for washing, a wash-basin; and the expression is used here as one of contempt, as if he would use it as the meanest vessel is used. It implies that Moab was already subdued, and that the author of the psalm could make any use of it he pleased. It also implies that Moab was not regarded as adding much to his strength, or to the value of his dominions; but that, compared with other portions of his kingdom, it was of as little value as a wash-basin compared with the more valuable vessels in a house.

Over Edom will I cast out my shoe - Edom or Idumea was the country which still remained unsubdued. This David was anxious to possess, though the conquest had been delayed and prevented by the adverse circumstances to which allusion has already been made in the notes at the psalm. On the situation of Idumea, see the notes at Isaiah 11:14. In the margin this is, “triumph thou over me, by an irony.” It may be regarded as irony, or as a taunt, meaning that Philistia was no longer now in a situation to triumph over him; or it may be understood as referring to the exultation and shouting which would ensue on the reception of its sovereign. The former seems to be the most probable interpretation, as the language is undoubtedly intended to denote absolute subjection, and not the voluntary reception of a king. The language in the entire passage is that of triumph over foes.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Psalms 60:8". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/psalms-60.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Moab is my washpot,.... To wash hands and feet in: and so the Syriac version, "and Moab the washing of my feet"; a vessel for low and mean service, and so denotes the servile subjection of the Moabites to David; see 2 Samuel 8:2; and as the words may be rendered, "the pot of my washing"F18סיר רחצי "olla lotionis meae", Pagninus, Montanus, Michaelis, Gejerus; so Tigurine version, Musculus, Vatablus. . Great numbers of the Moabites might be at this time servants to the Israelites, and to David and his court particularly; and might be employed, as the Gibeonites were, to be drawers of water, to fill their pots, in which they washed their hands and feet, and their bathing vessels, in which they bathed themselves: Aben Ezra explains it,

"I wilt wash their land as a pot;'

and so may not only signify the very great subjection of the Gentiles, even the chief among them, to Christ and his church, Isaiah 49:23; but as Moab was begotten and born in uncleanness, and his posterity an unclean generation, it may design the washing, cleansing, sanctifying, and justifying of the Gentiles in the name of Christ, and by his Spirit, 1 Corinthians 6:11;

over Edom will I cast out my shoe; as a token of possessing their land, 4:7; so some; or of subduing them; putting the feet on which the shoe is upon the necks of them, Joshua 10:24. So Kimchi interprets it,

"the treading of my foot;'

to which the Targum agrees, paraphrasing it thus;

"upon the joint of the neck of the mighty men of Edom I have cast my shoe.'

It may allude to a customF19Elias in Tishbi, fol. 267. in confirming a bargain, or taking possession, to pluck off the shoe in token of it, נעלי may be rendered "my glove"; as it is by the Targum on 4:7; for, as the shoe encloses and binds the foot, so the glove the hand: and the allusion may be thought to be to a custom used by kings, when they sat down before any strong city to besiege it, to throw in a glove into the city; signifying they would never depart from the city until they had took it. Hence the custom, which still continues, of sending a glove to a person challenged to fight. And indeed the custom of casting a shoe was used by the emperor of the Abyssines, as a sign of dominionF20R. Immanuel apud Castell. Lex. Polygott. col. 2342. . Take the phrase in every light, it signifies victory and power; that he should be in Edom as at home, and there pluck off his shoe, and cast it upon him; either to carry it after him, as some think, which was the work of a servant, to which the Baptist alludes, Matthew 3:11; or rather to clean it for him; for as Moab was his washpot, to wash his hands and feet, in Edom was his shoe cleaner, to wipe off and remove the dirt and dust that was upon themF21Vid. Bynaeum de Calceis Heb. l. 2. c. 8. Gusset. Ebr. Comment p. 520. ; all which denotes great subjection: and this was fulfilled in David, 2 Samuel 8:14; and may refer to the spread of the Gospel in the Gentile world, and the power accompanying that to the subduing of many sinners in it, carried thither by those whose feet were shod with the preparation of the Gospel of peace;

Philistia, triumph thou because of me: some take this to be an ironic expression, like that in Ecclesiastes 11:9; so R. Moses in Aben Ezra, and also Kimchi. Triumph now as thou usedst to do, or if thou canst: but rather they are seriously spoken, seeing they had reason to rejoice and be glad, because they had changed hands and masters for the better, being subject to David, 2 Samuel 8:1, with this compare Psalm 108:9, and may very well be applied to the Gentiles, subdued and conquered by Christ, who triumph in him; and because delivered out of the hands of sin, Satan, and the world, through his victorious arms.


Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Psalms 60:8". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/psalms-60.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

Moab [is] my k washpot; over Edom will I cast out my shoe: l Philistia, triumph thou because of me.

(k) In most vile subjection.

(l) For you will lie and pretend you were glad.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Psalms 60:8". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/psalms-60.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Moab — is a my washpot - the most ordinary vessel.

over — or, “at”

Edom — (as a slave) he casts his shoe.

Philistia, triumph, etc. — or, rather, “shout.”

for me — acknowledges subjection (compare Psalm 108:9, “over Philistia will I triumph”).


Copyright Statement
These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Psalms 60:8". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/psalms-60.html. 1871-8.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Moab is my washpot; over Edom will I cast out my shoe: Philistia, triumph thou because of me.

Wash-pot — In which I shall wash my feet. I shall bring them into the lowest degree of servitude.

Shoe — I will use them like slaves; a proverbial expression.

Triumph — It is an ironical expression, signifying that her triumphs were come to an end.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Psalms 60:8". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/psalms-60.html. 1765.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

8Moab is my wash-pot In proceeding to speak of foreigners, he observes a wide distinction between them and his own countrymen. The posterity of Abraham he would govern as brethren, and not as slaves; but it was allowable for him to exercise greater severities upon the profane and the uncircumcised, in order to their being brought under forcible subjection. In this he affords no precedent to conquerors who would inflict lawless oppression upon nations taken in war; for they want the divine warrant and commission which David had, invested as he was not only with the authority of a king, but with the character of an avenger of the Church, especially of its more implacable enemies, such as had thrown off every feeling of humanity, and persisted in harassing a people descended from the same stock with themselves. He remarks, in contempt of the Moabites, that they would be a vessel in which he should wash his feet, the washing of the feet being, as is well known, a customary practice in Eastern nations. (394) With the same view he speaks of casting his shoe over Edom. This is expressive of reproach, and intimates, that as it had once insulted over the chosen people of God, so now it should be reduced to servitude. (395) What follows concerning Palestina is ambiguous. By some the words are taken ironically, as if David would deride the vain boastings of the Philistines, who were constantly assaulting him with all the petulance which they could command. (396) And the Hebrew verb רוע, ruang, though it means in general to shout with triumph, signifies also to make a tumult, as soldiers when they rush to battle. Others, without supposing any ironical allusion, take the words as they stand, and interpret them as meaning servile plaudits; that much and obstinately as they hated his dominion, they would be forced to hail and applaud him as conqueror. Thus in Psalms 18:44, it is said, “The sons of the strangers shall feign submission to me.” (397)


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Psalms 60:8". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/psalms-60.html. 1840-57.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Psalms 60:8 Moab [is] my washpot; over Edom will I cast out my shoe: Philistia, triumph thou because of me.

Ver. 8. Moab is my wash pot] A pot wherein to wash my feet, a vessel of dishonour, such as at my pleasure I will break in pieces, Psalms 2:9; and such as I reserve of them alive, shall be my scullions and underlings, glad to do my drudgery. Non vas coquendi carnes, sed lavandi pedes (Kimchi).

Over Edom I will cast out my shoe] i.e. Walk through their country as a conqueror; or, I will tread them under my feet; or, I will throw my shoe at the heads of them, and make them to take it up; or, I will make no more of subduing them, than of casting my shoe over them. Exutos mihi calceos et in ipsorum caput proiectos attollere iubebo (Beza).

Philistia, triumph thou because of me] i.e. Cry me up for thy king; Si velis, et videas quid in extremum eveniet, saith Kimchi. Or, triumph thou over me (by an irony) as thou lately didst over Saul and his sons in Mount Gilboa; and as since that time thou camest forth to seek me, but wentest home again by weeping cross.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Psalms 60:8". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/psalms-60.html. 1865-1868.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Moab is my wash-pot, in which I shall wash my feet. I shall bring them into the lowest degree of servitude, and make them contemptible and miserable. See 2 Samuel 8:2.

Over Edom, an old, and proud, and insolent, and cruel enemy of Israel,

will I cast out my shoe, i.e. I will use them like slaves; either holding forth my shoes, that they may pluck them off; or throwing my shoes at them, either in anger or contempt, as the manner of many masters was and is in such cases. Or, I will take possession of them; which was done by treading upon their land. Or, I will tread upon their necks; as they did in like case, Joshua 10:24. But these notions suit not with this phrase of casting or throwing the shoe.

Philistia, triumph thou because of me; or, over me, as thou didst in former years use to triumph and insult over the poor Israelites. It is an ironical expression, signifying that her triumphs were come to an end.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Psalms 60:8". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/psalms-60.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

8. Washpot—A vessel for common washing, as distinct from a seething pot, or a sacred vessel. Some suppose it the same as Herodotus mentions as (book ii, c. 172) used for “spitting and washing feet.” The term is expressive of great contempt and degradation.

Cast out my shoe—Rather, cast upon, or cast at, my shoe. The throwing the shoe at one, or striking him with it, was a sign of servile submission and contempt. The language is highly oriental, and must be explained in conformity with the usages and proverbialisms of the country. Wetzstein, however, thinks the most natural interpretation to be, “Moab is the vessel in which I wash my face and hands clean; that is, the country and people in which I acquire to myself (by its conquest) splendour and renown, and Edom I degrade to the place whither I throw my cast-off shoes; that is, I cause Edom to endure the most humiliating treatment, that of a helot” or slave. But the history of 2 Samuel 8:2, suggests a degradation of Moab not less than that of Edom. The figure is not to be compared with Ruth 4:7, which was a civil transaction denoting legal transfer.

Philistia, triumph… because of me— Not an irony. The word for “triumph” means simply to cry aloud, but whether for victory or from alarm and distress the connexion must determine. In Hiphil it is used in both senses. For distress, the wail of the captive, see Judges 7:21; Isaiah 15:4; Micah 4:9. “The Hithpael may also be used of a loud outcry of violence.”Delitzsch. Translate: Philistia, wail [as a captive] because of me. The preposition admits this sense, and the connexion and history require it. See note on Psalms 108:9


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Psalms 60:8". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/psalms-60.html. 1874-1909.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

Moab would serve God as a washbasin; namely, it would be reduced to the status of a servant. God"s people would experience purification there as they fought this neighbor. God would throw His shoe toward Edom as a man threw his shoe toward his servant when he came home. Evidently this was commonly done in the ancient Near East. The Edomites, like the Moabites, were God"s servants, not His sons in the same sense that the Israelites were. The NIV"s translation, "Over Philistia I shout in triumph," pictures God announcing David"s victory over the Arameans to this enemy.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on Psalms 60:8". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/psalms-60.html. 2012.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

Psalms 60:8. Moab is my wash-pot — The wash-pot being a mean article of household stuff, for the use of the feet, (as the Syriac interprets it,) the lowest part of the body, it is a fit title for the Moabites, whom David intended to bring into the lowest degree of servitude, and to render contemptible, 2 Samuel 8:2. Over Edom — An old, proud, insolent, and cruel enemy of Israel; will I cast my shoe — I will use them like slaves. I will, as it were, trample upon them; a proverbial expression. Philistia, triumph thou because of me — Or, over me, as in former years thou didst use to triumph and insult over the poor Israelites. It is an ironical expression, signifying that her triumphs were to come to an end. Bishop Patrick gives a different interpretation to this clause, thus: “The Philistines likewise, whom I have begun to smite, shall add to my triumphs, and be forced to meet me as their conquering Lord.”


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on Psalms 60:8". Joseph Benson's Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/psalms-60.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Search? Who can comprehend what thou hast prepared for this king? He may allude to the promises made to David's family, (Psalm lxxxviii. 30, 38.; Calmet) which should reign for ever, by means of Christ. (Haydock) --- Who can explain the mercy of God in redeeming us; and his fidelity in granting his promised rewards? (Worthington)


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Psalms 60:8". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/psalms-60.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

Moab . . . Edom. Spoken of as the chattels of a conqueror (2 Samuel 8:12-14).

washpot = footbath: i.e. an ignominious vessel.

cast out my shoe. Idiom for taking possession.

Philistia. Syriac reads "over Philistia".


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Psalms 60:8". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/psalms-60.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Moab is my washpot; over Edom will I cast out my shoe: Philistia, triumph thou because of me. Moab is my washpot - or washing-tub: expressing the ignominious subjection to which David reduced Moab (2 Samuel 8:2). To wash the feet is the office of a slave (John 13:8).

Over Edom will I cast out my shoe. The person who is about to wash his feet casts his shoe to a slave (Matthew 3:11; Acts 13:25). Translate 'to (not over) Edom' (Hengstenberg). Or else the idea of casting the shoe in contempt upon Edom expresses at once the taking possession victoriously of the Edomite land, and the treading upon the pride of Edom, wherewith he had trodden the Israelite land as an invader. So Psalms 60:12; 2 Samuel 8:14. The casting of the shoe was a symbol of transference of possession (Ruth 4:7; Joshua 10:24). So Muis. I prefer this.

Philistia. Moab Edom, Philistia, are mentioned in geographical order, beginning at the east, thence along the south to the west of the Holy Land.

Triumph thou because of me - raise a shout of joy for me, acknowledging me as your king (Psalms 41:11); in order to avert your destruction by me. In Psalms 108:9, "over Philistia will I triumph." Philistia's rejoicing in the triumph of Israel's king is "with trembling," (Psalms 2:11; Psalms 18:44, margin), Philistia, who had once triumphed over Israel's fall beneath herself, must now reluctantly join in Israel's triumph over herself (2 Samuel 8:1; 2 Samuel 8:14; 1 Chronicles 8:13). At the same time there is the covert implication that Israel's triumph will prove ultimately for Philistia's good; because Israel will at last be a blessing to the Gentile world.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Psalms 60:8". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/psalms-60.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(8) Moab is my washpot—i.e., probably the footbath, a figure expressing great contempt, which receives illustration from the story told of Amasis (Herod. ii. 172) and the golden footpan, which he had broken to pieces and made into an image of one of the gods—from base use made divine—as allegorical of his own transformation from a private person to a king. Others explain, from analogy of Arabic proverbs, that the conqueror would as it were wash his face white, i.e., acquire renown in Moab.

Possibly the comparison of Moab to a bath was suggested by its proximity to the Dead Sea, which might be said to be at the foot of Israel.

Over Edom . . .—The most natural explanation of this figure is that Edom is disgraced to the character of the slave to whom the conqueror tosses his sandals (na’al is collective), that they may be cleaned. (Comp. Matthew 3:11). The symbolic action of Ruth 4:7 had a different meaning, the transfer of a right of ownership, and so cannot be employed in illustration.

Of the “shoe,” as a figure of what is vilest and most common, Dr. J. G. Wetzstein quotes many Arabic proverbs. A covering for the feet would naturally draw to it such associations. (Comp. the use of footstool repeatedly in the Psalms, and Shakespeare’s use of foot,

“What my foot my tutor!”—Tempest.)

But the custom which Israel brought from Egypt (Exodus 3:3), of dropping the sandals outside the door of a temple, and even of an ordinary house, must have served still more to fasten on that article of dress, ideas of vileness and profanation.

Philistia, triumph thou because of me . . .—This cannot be the meaning intended by the clause, since it is quite out of keeping with the context, and in Psalms 108 we have the very opposite, “over Philistia will I triumph.” We must therefore change this reading so as to get, over Philistia is my triumph, or render the text as it stands, from analogy with Isaiah 15:4 : Upon (i.e., because of) me, Philistia, raise a mournful wail.

The LXX. and Vulg. indicate this meaning while translating the proper name, “the foreigners have been subdued to me.”


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Psalms 60:8". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/psalms-60.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Moab is my washpot; over Edom will I cast out my shoe: Philistia, triumph thou because of me.
Moab
2 Samuel 8:2; 1 Chronicles 18:1,2
over
Genesis 25:23; 27:40; Numbers 24:18; 2 Samuel 8:14; 1 Chronicles 18:13
triumph
or, triumph thou over me (by an irony).
108:9,10; 2 Samuel 5:17-25; 8:1; 21:15-22

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Psalms 60:8". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/psalms-60.html.

To report dead links, typos, or html errors or suggestions about making these resources more useful use our convenient contact form
Powered by Lightspeed Technology